A year in the life: Personal photos of the mayhem and magic that is working at HMNS

The end of one calendar year and the beginning of the next is always a good time to do a little tidying of your personal life. Calendars get replaced, inboxes get emptied and, for me, extra bits on my phone get dumped. So, under the auspices of cleaning out my phone, I came across some totally work-related photos I would like to share with you. They are weird, but so is working for a science-based non-profit.

For those that know us, Dave (Temple — HMNS’ Associate Curator of Anthropology and my husband) and I make sense. I am a little bit like the Martha Stewart of dead things and Dave is more like the Indiana Jones of Dimetrodons (although he would argue that he is the Alabama Dave of Dimetrodons). Perhaps with these photos you will get to know us — and the Museum — a bit better.

Enjoy!

Zombie Nicole. We run an overnight program here, and we like Halloween. ‘Nuff said.

Zombie Nicole

Chewbacca getting his fortune told.

chewbacca

Dave versus the tufted-ear Marmoset.

Marmoset Dave

True fact: Green-cheeked conures like watching Dr. Bakker.

bakker birdies

This is the kind of thing that can be found in our freezer. Crickets don’t cook themselves, people.

bug cooking

Eww.

HUMAN TEETH!

Me and Bobby McGee hanging out and waiting for our ride. We had an appointment with Dr. Dan that day.

Taxidermy Nicole

Making new friends during the Paleo Hall installation.

paleo install

Granted this photo is a little blurry, but check out that tiny frog!  There is a dime just visible in my hand for scale.

Teeny Tiny Froggie!

Dave at an ecological research station in Brazil. The park ranger there is referred to as the “Chuck Norris of Brazil.”

Brazil Dave

Pitcher plants = Awesome.

Pitcher plants

New officemate. Likes to give hugs with his mouth.

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Extra! Extra! Our dinosaur bath makes front page news and Dr. Bakker’s back in town

Check, check it out:

The Morian Hall of Paleontology gets some front-page love

That’s right, the long-deceased residents of our Morian Hall of Paleontology got some front page attention Tuesday after a weekend cleaning courtesy of Associate Curator of Paleontology David Temple and artist-cum-dino-installer John Barber. You think cleaning your living room is hard? Try cleaning dinosaur bones. It takes delicacy, focus and a steady hand. Just listen to Houston Chronicle reporter Allan Turner’s account of the meticulous process:

In their arsenal are a compressor capable of blasting air at 60 pounds per square inch and its 6-foot wand, a tool designed for the purpose by Barber.

For the most delicate work, the men use makeup brushes, as well as brushes designed for the application of wallpaper paste and gold leaf.

Our hall has seen 350,000 people since June and accumulated plenty of dirt and residue from dander, dust mites and clothing fibers. In order to keep our specimens looking spotless, Temple undertakes several three to four after-hours cleaning sessions per year.

Want to learn more about the inhabitants of our Morian Hall of Paleontology — and how they came to perish? Our distinguished Curator of Paleontology, Dr. Bob Bakker, hosts a lecture on Tuesday, Oct. 30 called “Life After the Dinosaurs: Darwinian Saga of the Mammalia.

Bakker will explain how climate change helped mammals overtake dinosaurs approximately 65 million years ago. To purchase tickets, click here.

Oh, just another day in the life of exhibits: Installation in pictures (with inanimate commentary)

Done any home improvement projects lately? Us, too! This Monday we installed two new nautical creatures in the new Hall of Paleontology, and we documented one of the installs for you fine people.

THIS GUY:

DSC_0002Know what he is? He’s a ginormous Eurypterid, otherwise known as a sea scorpion. We don’t know about y’all, but we’re pretty glad these thingers are extinct. I mean, he’s a whopper (and he looks angry):

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Associate Curator of Paleontology David Temple was on-hand for the install. Here he is giving Eury a pep-talk. We imagine he’s saying something like “No, your chelicerae don’t look big in this sling.”

DSC_0017You’ve got to have velvet hands to be a handy-man at HMNS. Eury, meanwhile, is #overit.

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Up, up and away!

DSC_0029Buckle up, Eury. You’re about to go for a ride.

DSC_0041“Do you even know what you’re doing?”

DSC_0071And finally, we’re finished!

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Come meet Eury for yourself at the new Hall of Paleontology. We’re open late today (Tuesday) — ’til 8 p.m.!

Explore: Snow Science [12 Days of HMNS]

Hello, holidays! Today is the First Day of HMNS – for the next 12 days, we’ll be featuring another fun video of a holiday museum activity here on the blog (or, you can get a sneak peek at all the videos on 12days.hmns.org – we won’t tell).

For our first video, we wondered about snow – something we were shocked to see falling here in Houston on Dec. 4 – the earliest recorded snowfall in local history. So, we asked Gene Norman, Chief Meteorologist at KHOU, to explain a few things. Like: why is snow white? Are all snowflakes really unique? And – will we see snow falling in Houston again this year?

Click play to see for yourself!

Visit the Gene Norman Weather Center at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, a one-of-a-kind interactive exhibit, where kids and parents can conduct a live weather forecast in precisely the same manner as Norman does on the local news each evening.

Get into the holiday spirit! Visit our 12 Days of HMNS web site to see the videos and get more information about each event, exhibit and film!

Happy Holidays!