STEM & GEMS: BP financial analyst Lyda Marie T. Paragoso tells girls to stay STEM curious

Editor’s Note: As part of our annual GEMS (Girls Exploring Math and Science) program, we conduct interviews with women who have pursued careers in science, technology, engineering, or math. This week, we’re featuring Lyda Marie T. Paragoso, Financial Analyst for BP’s Gulf of Mexico Operations Budgeting & Forecasting.

HMNS: How old were you when you first become interested in science, technology, engineering, and/or math?
Paragoso: I was five years old when I first became interested in science, technology, engineering and math.

HMNS: Was there a specific person or event that inspired you when you were younger?
Paragoso: My parents and PBS inspired me when I was younger. My brother and I had a Popular Science subscription, and we always watched this PBS show called 3-2-1 Contact, which was an American science education show and taught scientific principles and their applications.

HMNS: What was your favorite project when you were in school?
Paragoso: In 5th grade, I made a 3-D model of the kidney organ which won an award and was displayed at the library of my elementary school. I also really enjoyed my sugar crystals science project, and in 8th grade for my Honors Earth Science project, I made a video acting as a weather forecaster using my homemade weather map.

HMNS: What is your current job? How does this relate to science, technology, engineering, and/or math?
Paragoso: 
My current job deals more with math; I interface a great deal with engineering and technology. Specifically, I’m currently a Financial Analyst at BP Gulf of Mexico Operations on the Budgeting & Forecasting team. I deal with a lot of financial data to create performance reports, analyze operations metrics and key performance indicators, and present them to the Operations Leadership Team and to the VP of Operations in order to formulate better financial forecasts and formulate more robust operations budgets.

HMNS: What’s the best part of your job?
Paragoso: The best part of my job is that I get to interface with many engineers, project managers, and other financial folks to better understand the BP oil and gas business in the Gulf of Mexico.

HMNS: What do you like to do in your spare time?
Paragoso: In my spare time, I enjoy traveling, cooking, playing the guitar and piano, people watching, training in Bujinkan Ninjutsu (I’m a first degree black belt), and going to the theater and movies. When time permits, I also like to volunteer for the Empowering Amputees organization, The Ronald McDonald House, and Notre Dame Catholic Church (my local church).

HMNS: What advice would you give to girls interested in pursuing a STEM career?
Paragoso: Stay curious, focused and determined. Be open to opportunities that will get you challenged and involved.

HMNS: Why do you think it’s important for girls to have access to an event like GEMS?
Paragoso: It is very important for girls to have access to an event like GEMS because it is a source of inspiration and a way to feed that curiosity and hunger for knowledge in science, technology, engineering and math.

HMNS: Tell us an interesting fact about yourself.
Paragoso:
I’m an amputee and a cancer survivor (lost my left leg when I was 10 years old due to bone cancer, also known as osteosarcoma).

Biography of Lyda Marie T. Paragoso:
Lyda Marie T. Paragoso is currently a Financial Analyst for Gulf of Mexico (GoM) Operations Finance Budgeting & Forecasting team in support of the Discipline Capability organization, Logistics organization, VP of Operations and overall performance management across the Operations Budgeting & Forecasting teams within Gulf of Mexico Operations.

Lyda’s prior role was Performance Analyst in GoM Logistics where she was responsible for the monthly quarterly performance reports (QPRs) for each of the Gulf of Mexico production assets. She joined BP in 2004 and has held a variety of Financial Analyst roles in both North America Gas and Gulf of Mexico.

Prior to BP, she was an Assistant to the Controller at the University of St. Thomas and Tax Associate/Consultant at Arthur Andersen, LLP. Lyda has a BBA/MBA in Accounting/Finance from the University of St. Thomas in Houston.

 

STEM & GEMS, Part I: Air Liquide’s Victoria Rockwell makes the most of math in her career

FINAL-Vickie_Rockwell_smallIn anticipation of our upcoming GEMS (Girls Exploring Math and Science) event on Feb. 8, we interviewed several women who have pursued careers in math and science. This week we’re featuring Victoria Rockwell, Director of Investor Development at Air Liquide.

HMNS: How old were you when you first became interested in science, technology, engineering, and/or math (STEM)?
Rockwell: I was in the 4th grade and read a book on the stars. It showed pictures of the constellations. I lived in the country and when I looked up to the sky at night, the constellations were there – just like in the book!

HMNS: Was there a specific person or event that inspired you when you were younger?
Rockwell: My grandparents were immigrants from Europe and valued learning. “Learn all that you can — no one can ever take that away from you.” “Be whatever you want to be. Don’t let people tell you that you cannot.” These were the words of encouragement that I received. My role model was my mother who was a Rosie-the-Riveter-type during World War II. All her life she tried new things and careers and kept looking forward — never looking back.

HMNS: What was your favorite science project when you were in school?
Rockwell: Science projects, not so much … but I love math. I love solving mysteries, and to me, a math problem is solving a mystery. Who is X? Why does Y change things? How are they related? Did Z kill Q?

HMNS: What is your current job? How does this relate to science, technology, engineering, and/or math?
Rockwell: My current job is the Director of Investment Development at Air Liquide. There is still a lot of math involved, but we take an idea and create a new thing — a plant. It starts with an idea, an open field, engineers designing and making drawings, construction crews with hard hats and heavy equipment, digging in the dirt … and then building up, piping and tying all the pieces together. Finally the engineers start it all up — pushing the buttons to make the new products.

HMNS: What’s the best part of your job?
Rockwell: Working with a lot of smart, creative and interesting people.

HMNS: What do you like to do in your spare time?
Rockwell: I am active in engineering professional societies. As part of the work I do there, I meet with students, parents, community members, university faculty, and other engineers to tell them about the importance of engineering and science in our lives. As part of my involvement in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), I was invited to the White House three times to participate in events that promoted women and the economy. I met Mrs. Obama, the president’s science adviser, and even the President on my last visit.

HMNS: What advice would you give to girls interested in pursuing a STEM career?
Rockwell: GO FOR IT! Don’t let anyone tell you it is not for you. If you have the interest, explore it. If you stumble the first time, try again. Sometimes you are not ready to learn the first time around.

HMNS: Why do you think it’s important for girls to have access to an event like GEMS?
Rockwell: To give them the support, options and opportunities. Engineering, math and science are fun. There are mysteries to solve, things to explore that lead to new discoveries, and ways to make the world a better place.

Know a girl who’s interested in math and science? Come to GEMS (Girls Exploring Math & Science) on Sat., Feb. 8 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.  The Museum will be filled with hands-on science and math for everyone to experience. Local professionals will be at the Museum to answer questions about their careers in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math.

The event is free with paid admission to the Museum. Click here for $7 admission to all permanent exhibit halls on Sat., Feb. 8.

Who run the (math and science) world? GIRLS! Join HMNS Feb. 16 for Girls Exploring Math and Science 2013

Remember when Beyoncé asked, “Who run the world?” We totally think she was on to something.

Join HMNS on February 16 for GEMS 2013, an entire day dedicated to the answer to that question — Girls Exploring Math and Science.

Join us Feb. 16 for GEMS: Girls Exploring Math and ScienceIn partnership with the Girl Scouts of San Jacinto Council, HMNS will host an open house with local professionals on-hand to answer questions and discuss their careers in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math. We’ll also have a variety of STEM-related activities and games, as well as informational booths on topics ranging from Mars rovers to human organs to optical illusions to the science behind skin care.

GEMS is open to girls of all ages as well as friends and family, so bring the whole crew!

What: Girls Exploring Math and Science (GEMS)
When: Saturday, Feb. 16; 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: HMNS Main Campus, 5555 Hermann Park Dr.
Cost: FREE with museum admission! (Click here for a coupon for discounted general admission!)

Student booths have just been accepted for GEMS 2013. Contact educationquestions@hmns.org for more info or to learn how you can participate.

GEMS is generously supported by Air Liquide and KBR.

SySTEMatic change: How HMNS is changing education and making math marvelous

S.T.E.M., which stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math, has become a popular acronym used amongst educators, and for good reason: S.T.E.M.-field careers are some of the most lucrative and have the greatest job growth potential in the early 21st century.

The S.T.E.M. philosophy is holistic: It seeks to revolutionize how math and science are taught by integrating technology and engineering into the classroom experience. In addition, it attempts to refocus the classroom away from a teacher-centric model toward a student-driven discovery process, where problem-solving and hands-on exploration are the child’s instructors.

LEGO RoboticsInstead of treating math and science separately, they are blended so that students develop real-world problem solving skills. No more asking the teacher, “When am I ever going to use this?” The hope is that students will understand at a basic level how science and math apply to their world.

HMNS embraces the S.T.E.M. philosophy wholeheartedly in our approach to education. Two of our most popular summer camps, LEGO Robotics and Advanced Robotics, are great examples of this approach.

And now, HMNS offers a similar S.T.E.M. experience during the school year! Children gain the educational edge that S.T.E.M. provides and have a blast in the process — without having to wait for summer camp or worry about early registration.

In our after-school program, children collaborate with a partner to construct models using the LEGO MINDSTORMS NXT™ system, then use brand new laptops to program the models to obey commands. They are given specific challenges and engage in friendly competitions to further hone their programming skills.

Don’t let your child miss out on this multidisciplinary, collaborative, and authentic learning opportunity. To learn more about LEGO Robotics at HMNS (Sept. 11 through Nov. 13) and HMNS Sugar Land (Sept. 13 through Nov. 15) and register for class, click here!