Spread your wings: Adopt a Butterfly at HMNS on May 10

The beauty of butterflies is undeniable. Whether you’re gazing at the brilliant hues of a Blue Morpho, taking in the incredible delicacy of Rice Paper butterflies as they flit about, or staring at an Owl Butterfly as its wings stare right back at you, these incredible creatures captivate the viewer.

6094403314_648e6790d4_b (1)And who looking upon them hasn’t wanted to have their very own butterfly garden? Luckily for you, what’s ours is yours. Everything at HMNS is here for you to make your own, and now, we don’t just want you to own the Cockrell Butterfly Center, but you can actually own a butterfly when you adopt one on May 10!

Just in time for Mother’s Day, you can adopt and release a butterfly right here in the Cockrell Butterfly Center! From 9-11 a.m. on May 10 for only $15 ($10 for members), you’ll be given a butterfly to release in the Butterfly Center and a personalized adoption certificate to take home. The perfect way to celebrate Mother’s Day, you can become a proud “parent” in your own right to one of nature’s most delicate and beautiful creatures.

STEM & GEMS: Insects and plants fascinate “bug nerd” Lauren Williamson

lauren photo in CBCEditor’s Note: As part of our annual GEMS (Girls Exploring Math and Science) program we conduct interviews with women who have pursued careers in science, technology, engineering, or math. This week, we’re featuring Lauren Williamson, Entomologist in the Cockrell Butterfly Center

HMNS: How old were you when you first became interested in science?
Williamson: Ever since I can remember! I was always catching bugs, playing with animals, and looking at flowers, plants, etc.

HMNS: Was there a specific person or event that inspired you when you were younger?
Williamson: I had a biology teacher in junior high that told me about entomology and told me that I should look into that field for a career since I had such an interest in insects.

HMNS: What was your favorite science project when you were in school?
Williamson: An insect collection, of course!

HMNS: What is your current job? How does this relate to science, technology, engineering, or math?
Williamson: My title is “entomologist”, aka “bug nerd.” My job revolves around importing exotic butterflies to display in our Butterfly Center. Not only do I need to know a lot about insects, but I also need to know about government regulations, computer applications, and accounting. We also do a lot of outreach programs, so it’s a necessity to be comfortable presenting to large groups.

To get a degree in entomology you have to take extensive coursework in biology, chemistry, physiology, and math.

HMNS: What’s the best part of your job?
Williamson: I play with butterflies all day — need I say more? Not to say that my job doesn’t involve a lot of hard work, because it does, but the fun parts of my job make it all worth it!

HMNS: What do you like to do in your spare time?
Williamson: I love to play with my animals (three dogs: Merle, Hank, and Molly; and a bird: Carlos), go on insect collecting trips, camping, crafts, going to museums and seeing movies with my husband.

HMNS: What advice would you give to girls interested in pursuing a STEM career?
Williamson:
Make sure you study, study, study! Ask a lot of questions and learn all of the material as much as possible. Every year adds more information to the knowledge base you already have, so it only gets harder.

HMNS: Why do you think it’s important for girls to have access to an event like GEMS?
Williamson: This is a great way to experience some of the wonderful career paths you can take with a firm knowledge of science, engineering, technology, and math. These subjects are the foundation of our everyday lives, whether you realize it or not! There will always be a demand for employees in these ever-growing and changing fields so it is important to get in an interest in them as soon as possible.

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