Intergalactic planet hoppers land at HMNS Sugar Land with Zula Patrol: Mission Weather

Do the names Bula, Multo, Zeeter, Wizzy or Wigg mean anything to you? They will after a visit to HMNS Sugar Land’s latest exhibit, Zula Patrol: Mission Weather, which teaches kids aged from pre-kindergarten to the third grade and beyond all about Earth’s weather systems with hands-on, interactive activities.

Zula Patrol: Mission Weather opens at HMNS Sugar Land Feb. 8!

Starting this Friday, this band of intergalactic fact-gatherers (as they’re called) will teach visitors about weather phenomena like clouds, precipitation, wind and temperature.

Based on the popular educational television program of the same name, the Zula Patrol museum exhibition aims to promote an understanding of and an interest in science and astronomy with character-driven storytelling.

Zula Patrol: Mission Weather is on exhibit at HMNS Sugar Land until May 27. For tickets, click here.

Explore: Snow Science [12 Days of HMNS]

Hello, holidays! Today is the First Day of HMNS – for the next 12 days, we’ll be featuring another fun video of a holiday museum activity here on the blog (or, you can get a sneak peek at all the videos on 12days.hmns.org – we won’t tell).

For our first video, we wondered about snow – something we were shocked to see falling here in Houston on Dec. 4 – the earliest recorded snowfall in local history. So, we asked Gene Norman, Chief Meteorologist at KHOU, to explain a few things. Like: why is snow white? Are all snowflakes really unique? And – will we see snow falling in Houston again this year?

Click play to see for yourself!

Visit the Gene Norman Weather Center at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, a one-of-a-kind interactive exhibit, where kids and parents can conduct a live weather forecast in precisely the same manner as Norman does on the local news each evening.

Get into the holiday spirit! Visit our 12 Days of HMNS web site to see the videos and get more information about each event, exhibit and film!

Happy Holidays!

Science Doesn’t Sleep (8.28.08)

Box Turtle Closeup
Creative Commons License photo credit: audreyjm529

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

Paleontologists have found the fossil of a 75-million year old pregnant turtle – something that has never before been found.

We’re lucky to have the Gueymard telescope – one of the largest in the country for public viewing – right in our backyard. But looking into the heavens wasn’t always so easy. Check out this list of 20 things you didn’t know about telescopes.

Are we giving robots too much power? The Onion weighs in.

Now we play the guessing game: what will happen with Hurricane Gustav?

Photos: a new statue of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius has just been uncovered in Turkey.