Last chance to see Terra Cotta Warriors — EVER! Hurry in before the army moves out Sept. 3

There may have been a Terra Cotta Warriors II, but — mark our words — there will not be a Terra Cotta Warriors III.

HMNS’ second special exhibition of the exquisitely detailed and distinct warriors that guarded the tomb of China’s First Emperor, Qin Shihuang, extends the story of the Qin, Han and Tang dynasties with 200 ancient works of art, including newly-discovered artifacts unearthed from imperial, royal and elite tombs.

golden dragon

The stunning exhibition — which also featured the premiere of a Terra Cotta Warrior with its original green paint still intact, thanks to new conservation techniques — closes Sept. 3.

What better way to celebrate Labor Day than to examine up-close the extreme care that went into each warrior’s individualized features, the fine ornaments and sacred objects, or the extraordinary works of art?

TCW II: Warriors, Tombs and TemplesHMNS is open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. from Sept. 1 through Sept. 3. Click here for tickets.

Terra Cotta Take Two: The warriors are back in Warriors, Tombs and Temples, opening Friday

Following the enormous success of Terra Cotta Warriors: Guardians of China’s first Emperor in 2009, the warriors are back for a new exhibit spanning three dynasties in Warriors, Tombs and Temples: China’s Enduring Legacy – opening Friday.

TCW II: Warriors, Tombs and Temples

Where Terra Cotta Warriors focused on artifacts from the tomb of Emperor Qin Shi Huang, Warriors, Tombs and Temples will encompass a greater span of history throughout three dynasties: The Qin, Han and Tang.

In addition, the warriors to be unveiled Friday have benefited from more advanced conservation techniques, and some figures even have their original paint in tact. Among these is a Terra Cotta Warrior whose face is painted green – known as the kneeling archer – which is being revealed for the first time.

TCW II: Warriors, Tombs and Temples

Also featured in the new exhibition are 200 ancient works of art, many never before seen outside of Chin. Some of our unbiased favorites? A gold-coated iron dragon who expertly balances on his two front feet (pictured above); intricate, miniature reliquaries crafted to house the finger bones of Buddha; and a magnificent life-size figure of a chariot horse, typical of the horses discovered in the tomb compound of Emperor Qin Shihuangdi.

WTT finger coffins

Want to do your own digging through the warrior remains? Warriors, Temples and Tombs is on view until Sept. 3.

August Flickr Photo of the Month: Terra Cotta Warriors!

Houston Cougars

There are some amazing photographers that wander the halls of HMNS – as well as the areas surrounding the Museum in Hermann Park. When we’re lucky, they share what they capture in our HMNS Flickr pool. Each month, we highlight one of these photos here on the blog.

This month, we’re featuring a photo from Arie Moghaddam, known as Houston Cougars on Flickr, who is a regular attendee of the Museum’s Flickr meetups. This photo is from the meetup we held in our Summer 2009 exhibition, Terra Cotta Warriors: Guardians of China’s First Emperor.

Why would we feature an image that’s celebrating it’s 2nd birthday? First: we’re thinking a lot about the Terra Cotta Warriors lately – since we’ve just announced a new exhibit featuring these wonders of the world!

Warriors, Tombs and Temples opens April 1, 2012!

The upcoming exhibit  includes 200 incredibly preserved ancient works of art featuring newly-discovered artifacts unearthed from imperial, royal and elite tombs and from beneath Buddhist monasteries in and around the capital cities of three great dynasties – as well as four of the famous life-size Terra Cotta Warriors!

And, second: it’s a great image with a unique perspective on the original exhibit. Arie shared a few words about what inspired it:

As for what inspired me to take the picture (aside from you being nice enough to invite us), of all the pictures I took I think this one best captures the essence of the exhibit since it combines the statue, cross bow, and armor in a logical order which any emperor would be pleased to have in his necropolis.

Inspired? Most of the Museum’s permanent galleries are open for photography, and we’d love for you to share your shots with us on Flickr, Facebook or Twitter. Check out the HMNS photo policy for guidelines.

Terra Cotta Warriors was a temporary exhibit, and photography was restricted outside of special Flickr meetup opportunities. Follow our posts in the HMNS Flickr pool for announcements about upcoming events.

What can you do with 63 hours?

Aerial view Terra Cotta WarriorsOnly six days remain. Six days, to see one of the eight wonders of the world. The Terra Cotta Warriors, from Xi’an, China, will be available for your viewing pleasure, for six more days.

Have no fear. Here at HMNS, we know you’ve been busy – and this is something that no one should miss. So, we’re making things just a little bit easier for you to meet the warriors before they’re gone. We are extending our normal viewing hours to make sure as many people as possible have the time and chance to see this amazing exhibit before it leaves.

We will open at our normal hour of 9 a.m. on Friday, October 16 for a 63-hour Terra Cotta Warriors marathon and we won’t close until midnight on Sunday, Oct. 18. That’s 63 straight, uninterrupted hours for you to come in and see the exhibit. Want to meet China’s First Emperor at 3 a.m.? No problem.

63 hours. To put this span in perspective, I’ve devised a list of a few activities you might be able to do in 63 hours.

*Fly to the moon. A manned spacecraft takes roughly three days to fly to the moon.

*Learn the names of all 203 recognized U.N. countries.

*Watch “The Burning of the Red Lotus Temple,” a 1928 Chinese film that runs at about 27 hours, 2 1/5 times.

IMG_1143
Creative Commons License photo credit: thomas_sly

*Run the world’s fastest marathon (at two hours and four minutes) almost 30 times.

*Have a cell divide anywhere from two to five times inside of you.

*Listen to the song “Choak and Ace” (at a recorded length of 4 hours, 27 min, and 32 seconds) 13 and 1/3 times

*Go through almost one percent of pregnancy (not really recommended for the men reading this.)

*Experience the Terra Cotta Warriors at HMNS. This probably won’t take the full 60 hours. However, it is less dangerous than flying to the moon, won’t get stuck in your head like listening to the same four hour song 13 times, and is a lot less tedious than learning the names of 203 countries.

If you haven’t seen the warriors yet, we hope you’ll come by this weekend – any time.  See you there!