Are you a Fabergénius? Take this quiz and find out!

Are you an expert in enameling? An authority on artistry? Take this quiz to test your knowledge of all things Fabergé, and then learn more with a visit to our Fabergé: A Brilliant Vision exhibit!

Faberge egg

1. What “surprise” was inside the Imperial Egg created by Fabergé?
a.    Hen
b.    Elephant
c.    Clock pendant
d.    Picture frame

2. Carl Fabergé was:
a.    French
b.    German
c.    Russian
d.    British

3. Fabergé sold his items through:
a.    Retail stores in Russia
b.    Retail store in London
c.    By mail order
d.    All of the above

4. Where did Fabergé prefer to obtain his raw materials for his pieces?
a. China
b. France
c. Russia
d. South America

5. What do we call a Fabergé sold to deceive the buyer?
a. Fake
b. Fauxberge
c. Counterfeit
d. Phony

6. How many items did the Fabergé Company produce?
a. 150,000
b. Less than 1,000
c. 10,000
d. Approximately 1,000,000

7. Which of the following items did Fabergé make?
a. Obsidian Sea Lion
b. Gherkin (pickle) sent jar
c. Gum pot
d. All the above

8. What does the “Bonbonniére” mean?
a. Egg
b. Cigarette Holder
c. Candy Box
d. Scent Bottle

9. Which of the following techniques were used by Fabergé?
a. Cloisonné
b. Enameling
c. Guilloché
d. All of the above

10. Who of the follow did NOT produce items for the Fabergé Company?
a. Workmasters
b. Contracted Artists
c. Women
d. Cartier

11. Fabergé’s Flower Studies were important to Russians because…
a. It reminded them of their childhood
b. Russia was a major exporter of lilies
c. It reminded them of the spring to come
d. It had important herbal qualities

12. Which of the following did Fabergé NOT produce items for?
a. The Imperial (Romanov) Family
b. The Russian Military during World War I
c. The Forbes Family
d. The Nobel Family

13. Which modern toy represents Fabergé’s guilloché technique?
a. Etch-a-Sketch®
b. Lite Brite®
c. Spirograph ®
d. None of the above

14. On which holiday were the Imperial Eggs given to the Tsarina?
a. Christmas
b. Birthday
c. Thanksgiving
d.  Easter

15. Which of the following did Fabergé produce?
a. Circus Hippo
b. Swinging Parrot
c. Sea Lion on a Rock
d. All of the above

16. What does a Vesta Case hold?
a. Cigarettes
b. Matches
c. Headache tablets
d. Bullets

17. What was the purpose of the bell push?
a. To ring for a servant
b. To light the furnace
c. To announce your presence
d. None of the above

18. Which famous movie star is in one of the Fabergé picture frames at HMNS?
a. Lucille Ball
b. Michael Jackson
c. Bill Gates
d. Liz Taylor

19. Which of the follow Fabergé items could be found in an office?
a. Ruler
b. Pencil holder
c. Stamp holder
d. All of the above

20. Which of the following precious gems were used by Fabergé?
a. Diamonds
b. Sapphires
c. Rubies
d. All of the above

Are you a Fabergenius? Find out tomorrow when we post answers to today’s trivia!

Intergalactic planet hoppers land at HMNS Sugar Land with Zula Patrol: Mission Weather

Do the names Bula, Multo, Zeeter, Wizzy or Wigg mean anything to you? They will after a visit to HMNS Sugar Land’s latest exhibit, Zula Patrol: Mission Weather, which teaches kids aged from pre-kindergarten to the third grade and beyond all about Earth’s weather systems with hands-on, interactive activities.

Zula Patrol: Mission Weather opens at HMNS Sugar Land Feb. 8!

Starting this Friday, this band of intergalactic fact-gatherers (as they’re called) will teach visitors about weather phenomena like clouds, precipitation, wind and temperature.

Based on the popular educational television program of the same name, the Zula Patrol museum exhibition aims to promote an understanding of and an interest in science and astronomy with character-driven storytelling.

Zula Patrol: Mission Weather is on exhibit at HMNS Sugar Land until May 27. For tickets, click here.

Fabergé: A Brilliant Vision opens Friday — take a gander at some highlights here and hightail it to HMNS!

We can hear that sharp intake of breath from here. Believe us; we relate. The first time we saw the McFerrin Collection — an extension of the exhibit on display here in 2010 — it was hard to find the words.

When we were finally able to articulate ourselves, our utterances were monosyllabic: “Wow.”

Three-Compartment Vanity Case by Faberge, workmaster Henrik Wigstrom, St. Petersburg c 1910.

Three-Compartment Vanity Case by Fabergé,
workmaster Henrik Wigstrom, St. Petersburg c 1910.

The McFerrin collection has expanded to include more than 350 objects, all on extended loan at HMNS and free for members.

Gold-Mounted Rose Diamond and Moonstone Brooch Faberge, workmaster Feodor Afanasiev, initials of Faberge, assay mark of St. Petersburg Moscow, c 1899 - 1908.
Gold-Mounted Rose Diamond and Moonstone Brooch Fabergé, workmaster Feodor Afanasiev, initials of Fabergé,
assay mark of St. Petersburg Moscow, c 1899 – 1908.

Some highlights include a picture frame that once belonged to Liz Taylor (she replaced the Tsar’s face with her own, dahling), a handwritten note from Fabergé to a customer, and unexpected artifacts from the House of Fabergé’s war effort, including a surgeon’s knife.

For more information, including ticket prices and related special events, click here.

Ice Crystal Pendant by Faberge, workmaster Albert Holmstrom, St. Petersburg c 1913. Ice Crystal Pendant by Fabergé, workmaster Albert Holmstrom, St. Petersburg c 1913.

Educator How-To: Make your own Fabergé — ahem, Faux-bergé — egg, complete with a tiny surprise!

Hearing the name “Fabergé” evokes the splendor and extravagance of Imperial Russia. The famous House of Fabergé designed renowned Imperial Easter Eggs for the Romanov family, as well as an array of other practical items for the wealthy patrons of Europe.

Visitors to HMNS can glimpse this grandeur beginning Feb. 1 in a special exhibition from the McFerrin Collection. The exhibit, available with general admission, expands upon the collection exhibited in 2010 and features more than 350 objects, including a newly acquired Kelch egg and a frame that once belonged to Elizabeth Taylor.

Make your own Faux-bergé eggs with this simple hands-on activity! Decorate your hinged little works of art and design a special surprise to go inside:

Educator How-To: Making Faux-berge Eggs

Materials:
•    Plastic egg – any size
•    Quick-dry craft glue
•    Old paint brush – to apply glue
•    Glitter in the color/s of your choosing
•    Thick cardboard
•    Scissors
•    Something fun to put inside your egg
•    Fake gems or other sparkles to decorate your creation

Educator How-To: Making Faux-berge Eggs

Procedure:
1.    Cut a circle of cardboard to fit in the bottom half of the egg as a resting spot for your object. (In our case, a very beautiful Glittersaurus rex.)
2.    Apply glitter to one side of the circle and set aside.
3.    Use a small piece of cardboard to create a hinge for your egg. Glue one side of the hinge to each half of the egg and allow to dry well.
4.    Paint your egg with glue and apply glitter liberally. Dry well.
5.    Apply gems or other decorations. Allow to dry.
6.    Insert your cardboard circle into the bottom of your egg. It should fit snugly.
7.    Lastly, put your treasure inside of your Faux-bergé egg.

Educator How-To: Making Faux-berge Eggs

Fabergé: A Brilliant Vision is organized by the Houston Museum of Natural Science with the McFerrin Collection.

Support provided by The Wortham Foundation, Inc.