Labor Day! Fun For The Long Weekend At HMNS

Monday is Labor Day – and you know what that means, right?

LONG WEEKEND.

In case you’re wondering how to fill the long hours between Friday afternoon and Tuesday morning, here’s a list of the top ten weekend experiences you can have with the family at HMNS all weekend long.

That’s right – we’re open MONDAY! Because we’re here for you. 

10. Come And Take It!

A look at the stunning variety of fascinating artifacts from Texas’ rich history, that is.

Come And Take It
The Come And Take It Cannon!
See a full set of photos from the exhibit on Flickr

Texas! The Exhibition closes at 5 pm on Monday, Sept 5 – so don’t miss your last chance to see Santa Anna’s spurs, Davy Crockett’s violin, the Davis Guards Medal and many other objects from a huge swath of Texas history – from prehistoric cultures to the Spindletop oil gusher.

Preview the exhibit with our blog series on Texas History! (And see how you can win free tickets to see the exhibit closing weekend!)

9. Ramble through Borneo with Orangutans

And while you’re at it, explore Tsavo with young elephants.

Born To Be Wild
The cuteness! See it this weekend in Born To Be Wild 3D at HMNS!

Born To Be Wild 3D is a fascinating, entertaining and heart-warming film chronicling the efforts of two pioneering women to save orphaned animals.

Time Out New York says “The kids will squeal with delight.” We think you probably will, too.

8. Discover The True Meaning of Mayan Prophecies 

2012: Mayan Prophecies
2012: Mayan Prophecies in the HMNS Planetarium

Worried about 2012? Explore the Mayan culture in this new planetarium film. Learn why Dec. 21, 2012 will be just another day, but the Mayan culture’s true contributions to civilization are unique and fascinating.

7. Solve A Crime!

If watching CSI makes you think you think “I could do that!” – this exhibit is for you! Study fingerprints, chromatographs, DNA, insect lifecycles, tire marks, hair analysis, thread comparison, and handwriting analysis to catch the culprit!

Crime Lab Detective opens at the Houston Museum of Natural Science at Sugar Land on Saturday, Sept. 3!

6. Watch A Butterfly Enter The World!

Cockrell Butterfly Center

Our butterflies flit through a three-story, glass enclosed rain forest habitat – and it’s a showstopper of the large-scale variety. But you shouldn’t miss the Hall of Entomology on the upper level – where you can watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalides daily. It’s a quiet moment of tranformation, rebirth and wonder that everyone should experience.

5. Discover a Modern-Day Dragon

Think all dragons breathe fire? Some just flash it – including The Dragon, one of the world’s most famous mineral specimens.

The Dragon | HMNS Mineral Hall

It just so happens to be part of our collection – on permanent display in the Hall of Gems and Minerals, along with literally hundreds of the world’s finest gems and minerals. Hundreds. 

4. Develop An Intense Desire To Wear This.

Ancient Ukraine Exhibit at HMNS
Preview the entire exhibition in this set of photos on Flickr.

If you’ve followed our advice on #4, you’ve likely whetted your appetite for gold. And our Ancient Ukraine exhibition (closing Sept. 5!) could be called: Gold! Oh, And Some More Gold. (Except that it also features fascinating artifacts made from many other materials, from the entire 6,000 year history of Ukraine.)

Get an idea of what you’re in for in our curator’s blog series on Ancient Ukraine.

3. Spend Saturday With The Stars!

George Observatory

Long weekends are the perfect time to make the long drive out to our George Observatory. It’s an hour outside Houston, but that means light pollution is at a minimum – and stars are at a maximum.

If you’ve never been, you will marvel  at the number of stars you can see with the naked eye – and the astronomical detail you can view through our Gueymard telescope, one of the largest in the country that’s available for public viewing.

The Observatory is open every Saturday night from 3 – 10 pm. Get Directions and information on Admission.

2. Explore Two Continents

Hall of the Americas

Our Hall of the Americas features cultures from the Inuit in Alaska to the Inca of Peru – go on an expedition through hundred of years of American history and over 2 continents this weekend!

1. Take The Science Fun Home!

The HMNS Museum Store has a metric ton of science ideas and activities to take home – and your purchases always support our science educational programs! Grab the Pocket Starfinder for your Big Bend camping excursion, take the Encyclopedia of Texas Shells on a seashore expedition, or identify what’s fluttering around your own backyard with the Butterflies of Houston and Southeast Texas Guide.

From a Galileo Thermometer to track the summer heat to a Dinosaur Hunter Field Canteen, we’ve got everything you need to close out the summer right!

Here’s to a great long weekend – hope to see you here at HMNS!

Go Stargazing! July edition

Jupiter becomes a late evening object by the end of the month.  It rises in the southeast just after 11 p.m. on July 1, although you may need to wait awhile for it to clear trees or buildings in that direction.  By month’s end, Jupiter rises at 9 p.m. — in late twilight.  Early risers can still see Jupiter in the southwest before dawn.  Next month, Jupiter is in the sky literally all night long.  Remember, Jupiter outshines everything in the sky except the Sun, the Moon, and Venus, so if you’re looking in the right direction, you can’t miss it.

Venus is a dazzling morning star this month.  Look east right as day begins to break for the brightest thing unless the Moon is nearby.  Venus remains the ‘morning star’ for the rest of 2009.  Mars is a little higher in the east at dawn than it has been.  Still, it remains fairly dim.  Look for Mars above Venus and to its right.  This is quite a mismatched pair; Venus is about 100 times brighter than Mars.

Saturn portrait
Creative Commons License photo credit: Elsie esq.

Saturn remains well placed in the evening sky this month.  Look for it in the west at dusk.  If you have seen Saturn through a telescope this year, you may have noticed how much thinner the rings appear now than in years past.  This is because Earth is beginning to align with Saturn’s ring plane, making the rings appear edge-on from our perspective.  On September 4, the Earth is exactly in Saturn’s ring plane, and the rings actually vanish from view!  It turns out, though, that Saturn is too close to the Sun in our sky on that date; the Earth will be about to pass on the far side of the Sun from Saturn.  No one can get a good look at Saturn this September.  However, we can still watch through our telescopes as Saturn’s rings appear thinner and thinner throughout July and August.

Saturn’s moons orbit in the same plane as its rings.  Since we ordinarily have a perspective looking over one of Saturn’s poles, moons such as Titan and Rhea can usually appear above or below Saturn as well as to its right or left in a telescopic image.  These moons are not normally blocked by Saturn.  That changes, however, when Earth aligns with Saturn’s ring plane.  Now that we’re seeing the entire system edgewise, we’re beginning to see Saturn’s moons pass in front of and behind Saturn’s disk.  The passage of a moon in front of a planet’s disk is a transit, while an occultation occurs when a planet’s disk blocks a moon.  When a moon transits, we can often see its shadow on the planet’s disk.  Here are some upcoming events for Saturn and Titan as seen from Houston:

7/9        Titan is partly occulted (blocked) by Saturn until 9:30 pm.

7/17      Titan is already in transit as night falls; it leaves the Sun’s disk between 9:45 and 10:20. (Titan appears as a disk and not a point, so it takes some time to move all of the way off Saturn’s disk.  Saturn sets by 11:15.

7/25      Titan is occulted by Saturn.

8/2        Titan is in transit from dusk until Saturn sets.  Titan’s shadow appears on Saturn’s disk at 9:30.

8/10      Titan occulted by Saturn

8/18      Titan transits Saturn.

By August 18, however, Saturn is so close to the Sun in our sky that it is only about five degrees high during late twilight and sets before night completely falls.

M42 Orion
Creative Commons License photo credit: makelessnoise

Look high in the west at dusk for stars in the shape of a backwards question mark, with a right triangle to the left of that.  These stars are in Leo, the Lion.  Saturn is under the ‘right angle’ in that right triangle.  The Big Dipper is high in the northwest on summer evenings.  From the Big Dipper’s handle, you can ‘arc to Arcturus.’  Arcturus, in the west at dusk, is the fourth brightest star we ever see at night and will be the brightest star in our night skies during all of July. Continuing the curve of the Big Dipper’s handle past Arcturus, you can ‘speed on to Spica,’ a star lower in the southwest at dusk.  Spica is a stalk of wheat held by Virgo, the Virgin, who represents the harvest goddess.

In the south as night falls is Antares in Scorpius, the Scorpion.  This is a red super giant star about 700 times as wide across as our Sun.  To the Scorpion’s left, look for eight stars in the shape of a teapot.  These stars are the bow and arrow of Sagittarius, the Archer.  In the east, the Summer Triangle dominates the evening sky.  The Triangle is up all night long until mid-August.  Vega is the brightest of the triangle’s three stars, followed by Altair in Aquila and Deneb in Cygnus.

Moon Phases in July 2009:

Full                                   July 7, 4:21 am
Last Quarter                     July 15, 4:53 am
New                                  July 21, 9:34 pm
1st Quarter                       July 28, 4:59 pm

Eclipsed? Not totally.
Creative Commons License photo credit: James Jordan

The New Moon of July 21 lines up well enough with the Earth and Sun to cast its shadow on the Earth.  This causes a total solar eclipse.  The Moon’s shadow first encounters the Earth just north of Mumbai in India, so that’s where the path of totality begins.  From there, the shadow moves across Bhutan and then southern China, including Shanghai.  The shadow then ends up over the Pacific Ocean and leaves Earth before ever again reaching land.  The only part of the US anywhere close to this path is Hawaii, which experiences a partial eclipse.  This is mostly an event for Asia, where the date will be July 22.

The next total solar eclipse visible in the USA will occur August 21, 2017.

The Full Moon of July 7 almost enters the Earth’s shadow.  It does skirt the edge of the penumbra, in which the Earth partially blocks the Sun.  The resulting penumbral eclipse is scarcely noticeable at all, however.

At 3 a.m. on Friday, July 3, Earth is as far as possible from the Sun (i.e., at aphelion).  Planetary orbits are not perfect circles but ellipses.  Thus, Earth does not remain at the same distance from the Sun throughout its orbit, but gets slightly closer in January and slightly farther in July.  The difference is only about 3.4%, however—not enough to affect our seasons.  The change in seasons is due to the Earth’s tilt on its axis, not the distance from the sun.

On the Tenth Day of HMNS…Explore the Cosmos at The George Observatory

The first time I went to the George Observatory, I saw Saturn. With my own eyes. Not a picture, not an artist’s rendering – the actual planet. It was…well, let’s just say I left full of a sense of wonder at the universe we live in – and the centuries of scientific achievements that have made that experience possible.

The Gueymard Telescope at the George Observatory is one of the largest in the country that is available for public use – and once you start looking through it, you won’t want to tear your eyes away. Saturday nights throughout the year, local astronomers and museum staff gather at the Observatory, and you can view through the Museum’s telescopes or the dozens that people bring with them. Some people get pretty high tech with it (check out this digiscoped picture) and it’s always a lot of fun.

In the video below, Barbara Wilson, the George Observatory astronomer, discusses what you can see at the Observatory – and talks about the most commonly asked questions, like “Have you ever seen a UFO?” Check out Barbara’s answer in the video below and visit the Observatory this holiday season to get all your cosmic questions answered.

The George Observatory is just one of the fun and fascinating options for families at the Houston Museum of Natural Science. In a take-off of everyone’s favorite holiday classic, The 12 Days of Christmas, we’ve got 12 ideas for fabulous family fun this holiday and we’ll be sharing the possibilities here every day until Christmas Eve. Best of all, most are activities that last past the holiday season – some, year round. You can also check them all out now at the spiffy new 12 Days of HMNS web site.

Check out the first nine days of HMNS:
On the first day of HMNS, explore The Birth of Christianity.
On the second day of HMNS, shop for Sci-tastic gifts.
On the third day of HMNS, meet Prancer the reindeer.
On the fourth day of HMNS, discover the making of The Star of Bethlehem.
On the fifth day, move it, move it with Madagascar 2 in the Wortham IMAX Theatre.
On the sixth day, hunt dinosaurs with Dr. Bob Bakker.
On the seventh day, look inside the human body in BODY WORLDS 2.
On the eighth day, meet the HMNS Entomologists.
On the ninth day, peer into the Gem Vault.