Science Doesn’t Sleep (7.31.08)

Countdown clock of Beijing 2008
Creative Commons License photo credit: Gene Zhang

So here’s what went down since you logged off.

2,100 years ago, the ancient Greeks used an astronomical calculator to set the date of the Olympic Games.

Well, they were looking for human remains…Puerto Rican police found bones and possible artifacts from a colonial-era ship.

George Jetson, here we come – NASA is offering $300,000 to the first person who develops a Personal Air Vehicle. And – it’s got to be green.

How can you tell your pants are really fancy? They tell you whether you might fall soon.

The Chronicle has a new evolution blogEvo.Sphere.

It has absolutely nothing to do with science (well, he did teach computer tech) but if you haven’t seen Randy Pauch’s The Last Lecture – you really should.

***UPDATE: Science won’t be sleeping next week, but I will be. Vacation! Have no fear, though – we’ve got lots of other very cool posts planned for all of next week, so please check back – and as always, leave us a comment to let us know what you think. SDS returns Aug. 11.

Science Doesn’t Sleep (7.21.08)

Lime
No, not that kind of lime.
Creative Commons License photo credit: Phillie Casablanca

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

The Olympics have been taken over by…the BLOB!

It’s hurricane season, and you know what that means – we’ve got one headed for us.

Adding lime to seawater could reduce atmospheric levels of CO2. It will not, however, make a very good margarita.

Archaeologists in Egypt will reassemble a boat built to ferry the pharoah into the afterlife.

Researchers at the University of Illinois have developed artificial whiskers that can sense their environment.

Science Doesn’t Sleep (7.17.08)

Clownfish!
Creative Commons License photo credit: watercolors08

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

National Geographic has beautiful photos of the Abrolhos Reef, off the coast of Brazil – which scientists have recently discovered is twice as large as previously thought.

Molecular hula hoops: very tiny fun!

The Maker Faire is coming to Austin. According to the organizers, it’s “a newfangled fair that brings together science, art, craft and engineering plus green, food and music in a fun, energized, and exciting public forum.” Will you enter? Tell us what you’re making!

Ohhh…I see. When you said “lucky” what you really meant was “carcinogenic.”

Stephen Hobley plays a harp made of lasers - that also functions as a controller for Guitar Hero. Best of all – you can build one, too! (Love Guitar Hero – but not DIY enough to make your own laser version? Check out Rockfest in the Grand Hall this Saturday.)

SciGuy‘s got a list of Houston’s most generous science philanthropists - it’s a chronicle not just of their generosity, but also the cutting-edge science facilities we have here in Houston. He’s posting them one at a time, so check back.

AquaJellies!

Science Doesn’t Sleep (4.30.08)

Home Cinema Sunday. Popcorn Sunday.
Creative Commons License photo credit: kozumel

So here’s what went down since you logged off.

I think I’ll go with the Raisinettes next time. A new study shows a higher incidence of lung disease among popcorn-factory workers.  

An Australian geologist has found a rare meteorite impact crater - using Google Earth. What can you find?

Pro athletes already seem superhuman – what happens if they start being genetically engineered? SciGuy has an interesting take on whether genetics are the steroids of the future.

 Did you catch the Messenger this month? If not, the Sydney Observatory has a great photo post about the changing brightness of Mars.

Hurry up, Jr. – your bald eagle stew is getting cold! The best way to save an endangered species might be to get people to eat it.