Attention, shoppers: The HMNS Museum Store has a new address at museumstore.hmns.org

Ermagherd, it’s here!

The HMNS Museum Store has a new address online

 

The HMNS Museum Store is now online. That’s right, all the gleaming goodies at our stunning store are now available for purchase at our brand new online address: museumstore.hmns.org.

Apparel and accessories that make you think. Home goods that make you giggle. Jewelry that makes people jealous. It’s all online just in time for the holidays, with a little extra cheer: 100 percent of the Museum Store proceeds benefit HMNS and its programming. AND you can get it all with your member discounts that you won’t get anywhere else.

 

The HMNS Museum Store has a new address online

 

So what are you waiting for? Get shopping!

The More Things Change, The More They Stay The Same

The more things change, the more they stay the same… Recently I read an interesting book, entitled “Are We Rome?” The author remarks how in some regards the Roman Empire and the current United States resemble each other very much. Take, for example, the issue of border crossings.

Claudius Glyptotek Copenhagen
Creative Commons License photo credit: Joe Geranio

For those who remember reading about Julius Caesar and his conquest of Gaul, the Roman Empire went through long periods of expansion, followed by consolidation, and eventual collapse as a political entity. As the Empire was expanding, there was a famous foray across the Rhine into what is now Germany. It did not work out well for the Romans, as they lost several legions, allegedly causing the first Emperor, Augustus, to cry out loud that he “wanted his legions back,” while also decreeing that the river Rhine would become the frontier. In 1987, the exact location of that battle was established. For about a century this notion held: the Rhine and the Danube formed the frontier between the so-called civilized world and the barbarians. Then Dacia (current day Romania) was conquered and the Romans found themselves on the other side of the river again. In 272 AD, they abandoned this province in return for a brief period of peace and tranquility.

For a long time, it was thought that the incursion in 9 AD represented the first and last military operation into Germany. Not so any more, apparently. Recent reports out of Germany indicate that some time between A.D. 180-260, there was a major battle fought between Roman troops and Germanic tribes. The newly uncovered battlefield near Kalefeld-Oldenrode, is located south of Hanover. Coins, weapons and other military gear were retrieved from an area one mile long and a third of a mile wide. Interestingly, among the artifacts encountered was a Roman horse sandal, or hipposandal in technical lingo. You read this right: a horse sandal, not a horse shoe.

Boundary - Boulder
Creative Commons License photo credit: joiseyshowaa

In all of this I see parallels to our current situation related to the border between the US and Mexico. What now constitutes the border area, was first inhabited by American Indian peoples, later incorporated into Mexico and ultimately made part of the US, either by force of arms, or by purchase. Along large stretches of this border, a fence is going up. One of the goals is to control who crosses the border and to safeguard life and property on this side of the fence.

All of this echoes sentiments expressed almost two millennia ago.With regards to the Roman situation we have the benefit of hindsight; we know how that story ended. With regards to the current situation, who knows? Future historians will have the privilege of assessing that scenario. Of one thing I am certain: future archaeologists will not be finding any horse sandals along the Rio Grande.

BEYONDbones – Now on Alltop

Featured in Alltop

When you’re looking for great web sites and blogs online, you can idly search over time, tripping through the blogrolls of your favorite bloggers, making random discoveries from e-mail forwards or news items on up and coming sites…or you can go to Alltop.

Alltop bills itself as “an online magazine rack of popular topics.” Whatever you’re interested in – they’ve got a page devoted to it, that aggregates all the best blogs and headlines for you, all in one place.

Dads, Nintendo, Interior Design, Baking, Extreme Sports, Twitterati, Wine, Heavy Metal, Animation, Sailing…it goes on and on.

If you’re interested in a topic and you can’t find it on Alltop – I’d like to hear what it is. In fact, they’d probably like to hear what it is, so they can start developing a new page for it.

In short, it’s a pretty awesome spot to find information online, and one that I’ve been using for some time – for research, exploring, catching up on news, and procrastinating in general.

So I was pretty thrilled this morning, when I discovered that this blog, BEYONDbones, was just added to the science category. You can find us at science.alltop.com. We’re in there with some pretty amazing sites – the fascinating SciGuy, LiveScience, Science Friday, NatGeo News and more. Because:

Alltop. We're kind of a big deal.

And by “we,” I mean the amazing bloggers from all corners of HMNS, who provide fascinating news, projects, perspectives and ideas here daily – and especially all of you. Whenever a comment or question comes through, it totally makes our day – it’s a hugely big deal that you choose to spend a little bit of your time with us each day, whether for for research, exploring, catching up on news – or procrastinating in general. Thanks for reading! And, as always, please leave us a comment to let us know what you think, what you wonder about – and what else you’d like to see here at BEYONDbones.

Science Doesn’t Sleep (9.4.08)

Released to Public: Astronaut Robert L. Curbeam, Jr., STS-116 Spacewalk (NASA)
“Houston…we’ve got a
SPAM problem.”
Creative Commons License photo credit:
pingnews.com

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

There’s a new Manhattan floating around the Arctic – and it’s made of ice. Canada’s polar ice shelves are “crumbling at an alarming pace.” In other good news: sea levels will rise much faster than we thought.

It’s possibly the lamest thing ever done in space: yesterday, astronauts spent some time updating their antivirus software.

It was the fake mustaches that tipped them off. Up to 10 percent of Near Earth Objects are comets impersonating asteroids – and new research aims to unmask them.

It’s really, really big: a black hole as big as 50 billion suns.

The ocean has its own lakes – called meddies – and scientists are using oil industry tech to study them.