Extra! Extra! Our dinosaur bath makes front page news and Dr. Bakker’s back in town

Check, check it out:

The Morian Hall of Paleontology gets some front-page love

That’s right, the long-deceased residents of our Morian Hall of Paleontology got some front page attention Tuesday after a weekend cleaning courtesy of Associate Curator of Paleontology David Temple and artist-cum-dino-installer John Barber. You think cleaning your living room is hard? Try cleaning dinosaur bones. It takes delicacy, focus and a steady hand. Just listen to Houston Chronicle reporter Allan Turner’s account of the meticulous process:

In their arsenal are a compressor capable of blasting air at 60 pounds per square inch and its 6-foot wand, a tool designed for the purpose by Barber.

For the most delicate work, the men use makeup brushes, as well as brushes designed for the application of wallpaper paste and gold leaf.

Our hall has seen 350,000 people since June and accumulated plenty of dirt and residue from dander, dust mites and clothing fibers. In order to keep our specimens looking spotless, Temple undertakes several three to four after-hours cleaning sessions per year.

Want to learn more about the inhabitants of our Morian Hall of Paleontology — and how they came to perish? Our distinguished Curator of Paleontology, Dr. Bob Bakker, hosts a lecture on Tuesday, Oct. 30 called “Life After the Dinosaurs: Darwinian Saga of the Mammalia.

Bakker will explain how climate change helped mammals overtake dinosaurs approximately 65 million years ago. To purchase tickets, click here.

Science Doesn’t Sleep (9.2.08)

Touchdown! The Tigers Win the Game!
He’s excited because he’s getting smarter.
Creative Commons License
photo credit: foundphotoslj

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

Crew aboard the International Space Station had a bit of excitement over the long weekend (on top of the presumably high levels created by living in space) – as they had to fire the station’s thrusters in a “debris avoidance maneuver.” This is a fancy way of saying they were about to be hit with space trash.

Not really a “team player?” No worries – even watching sports improves brain function.

The Rodney Dangerfield of the solar system: Astronomer Heidi Hammel wants you to know why the Icy Giants deserve more respect.

Even geniuses make mistakes: Einstein made at least 23 of them.

He was only 18 when he died, but King Tut may already have been a father – of twins.

Rap + Physics = awesome. A rap video about the science behind CERN’s Large Hadron Collider has been viewed over 600,000 times. It’s no dramatic hamster – but for a video about science, that’s pretty solid.

Meltdown: The Houston Chronicle weighed in on climate change today – what are your thoughts?

Science Doesn’t Sleep (7.31.08)

Countdown clock of Beijing 2008
Creative Commons License photo credit: Gene Zhang

So here’s what went down since you logged off.

2,100 years ago, the ancient Greeks used an astronomical calculator to set the date of the Olympic Games.

Well, they were looking for human remains…Puerto Rican police found bones and possible artifacts from a colonial-era ship.

George Jetson, here we come – NASA is offering $300,000 to the first person who develops a Personal Air Vehicle. And – it’s got to be green.

How can you tell your pants are really fancy? They tell you whether you might fall soon.

The Chronicle has a new evolution blogEvo.Sphere.

It has absolutely nothing to do with science (well, he did teach computer tech) but if you haven’t seen Randy Pauch’s The Last Lecture – you really should.

***UPDATE: Science won’t be sleeping next week, but I will be. Vacation! Have no fear, though – we’ve got lots of other very cool posts planned for all of next week, so please check back – and as always, leave us a comment to let us know what you think. SDS returns Aug. 11.

Science Doesn’t Sleep (7.8.08)

from-airplane-greenland-12
Creative Commons License photo credit: william.ward

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

Are melting glaciers causing sea levels to rise? A team from Utrecht University says no. A team from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute is exploring that issue this month – check back here for updates from Chris Linder.

And you thought the Sun was harsh – “O” stars in the Rosetta Nebula “can be a hundred times the size and over a thousand times brighter” – and they destroy planets.  

Despite the fact that scientists have traditionally been wary of Wikipedia – which relies on the “wisdom of crowds” – a new Gene Wiki is being developed to “describe the relationship and functions of all human genes.”

Ancient river camps show humans in Paris almost 10,000 years ago.

Researchers have developed a way to trick kidney cancer cells into killing themselves.  

The Chronicle has a new space blogCosmo.Sphere - written by a UT astronomer, a NASA vehicle systems engineer and a long-time amateur astronomer.