Girls take home STEM prizes at annual GEMS event!

Two weeks ago, we celebrated our annual Girls Exploring Math and Science (GEMS) public event! We had an amazing turnout from local STEM organizations presenting fun activities and demonstrations for kids of all ages. They also helped us find our top three student projects! These projects were presented at booths by students in middle school and high school. We had many amazing projects, and it was unfortunate we could only choose three winners! We’re proud to present the top three student projects.

3rd place winners

In third place, we have a group of high school students from the Jersey Village robotics team, Jersey Voltage. Their project entitled “Up, Up & Robots Away!” focused on the robot the group built in just six weeks. The robot was programmed to pick up and stack boxes more than six feet high. They hope to use their winnings to fund parts for their robot and their entry into robotics competitions.

2nd place winners

Our second place group presented a project called “Fun with Fizix,” which discussed several areas of physics. This group of girls from Awty International School demonstrated Bernoulli’s principle, as well as surface area and conservation of energy. They’d like to use their winnings to go on a field trip to see physics in action!

First Place Winners

Finally, we’d like to introduce our first place winners! The group of girls from Girl Scout Troop 21276 presented a project about genetically modified organisms called “GMOs: The New Revolution of Food.” They experimented growing different varieties of food to determine the effectiveness of GMO produce and food. The group created a model that described how genetically modified rice could last longer during the wet season than non-genetically modified rice. They plan to use the grand prize winning for the T.H. Rogers science program and perhaps a Night at the Museum!

Generic GEMS

Thank you for coming out to GEMS 2016! If you’d like to participate next year, please email for more information. Join us at next year’s GEMS event on February 18, 2017! 


Strong STEM Branches from GEMS: Girls Exploring Math and Science

The Houston Museum of Natural Science, along with the Girls Scouts of San Jacinto Council, cordially invite you to attend the Girls Exploring Math and Science event, Feb. 20 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. GEMS is a free event for members and is included with the purchase of a ticket to the museum’s permanent exhibit halls for non-members. It is open to girls and boys of all ages.GEMS4

Currently, women earn more college and graduate degrees than men, but a gender gap still persists in the fields of science and in higher-level math intensive fields such as engineering. The U.S. Census Bureau statistics place the percentage of women working in fields related to STEM at 7 percent in 1970 and at 23 percent in 1990. There has been little growth since, with an estimate of 26 percent, according to 2011 statistics.

There is plenty of evidence that demonstrates that many girls in elementary school show interest in STEM subjects and may even hold desires for future STEM-related careers. However, there is equal evidence that by fifth grade, interest appears to wane and continues to do so through high school in the general female population. While girls are not alone in this trend as it can be seen in other student demographics, it is troubling.


Keeping girls interested in science and math long-term is a broad-spectrum problem with no easy solution. However, there are a number of curative steps that can be implemented to recoup interest in STEM subjects. Increasing the visibility of female role models in math and science is one important step. This helps girls envision themselves in such fields. HMNS and the GEMS program capitalizes on this idea by incorporating young and enthusiastic female role models with whom girls can interact.

In addition, during GEMS, the museum is packed with hands-on science and math opportunities, community booths, and other science professionals. Children and adults can take their time to fully explore the opportunities and careers available in the fields of science and math.


Girls need opportunities and encouragement in a wide range of STEM-related activities not only at school, but also through extracurricular activities such as GEMS. Helping girls to see these fields as exciting, relevant, and viable will take hard work on the part of teachers, parents, community members, and volunteers. I encourage you to take a small step in providing this encouragement to a girl in your life by bringing her to experience GEMS.

Geology Rocks! How I got involved with Occidental Petroleum

by Tania Campbell


Here I am hiking the world famous Permian Reef Trail at the Guadalupe Mountains National Park to study carbonate rock outcrops.

I’ve worked as a production geologist for 11 years for Occidental Petroleum, and while that is a long run with one company in the energy industry, it has gone by fast. I remember being introduced to rocks in middle school, but by the time I was in high school, I was more interested in marine biology. I then went on to successfully complete a dual bachelor’s degree in marine science and geology, which laid the foundation for understanding carbonate rocks and basic geologic principles, starting me down my path as a production geologist.


The Miami Circle, where American Indians carved a circular structural support out of bedrock limestone.

The first community project I got involved in that I attribute as a catalyst to my geology interest was working with an archaeological site called the Miami Circle. Approximately 2,000 years ago, American Indians used the bedrock limestone to carve out a perfect circle to support a structure. As a volunteer I only found a few animal artifacts, but I was most interested in the exposed limestone.


A sample of core that has been cut and slabbed after it was taken from the subsurface in a well. A geologist will describe the rock types and features observed, and other interpretative data is combined to make geologic models and maps.

There are so many different kinds of specialties in geology that sometimes it can feel overwhelming trying to figure out what you want to do. I kept an open mind and set off to learn more with a master’s degree at a different school. It is highly recommended that geologists have their master’s if they want to work in the petroleum industry. I studied hydrogeology and petroleum geology for my master’s, which has helped me work better with team members from engineering backgrounds and develop further in my core profession of doing reservoir characterization. My role involves describing and modeling the layers of rock in the subsurface to predict the most favorable areas for continued secondary and tertiary hydrocarbon recovery.


Hiking with other geologists through the canyon cuts to map the rock types and observe vertical stacking of the layers of carbonates and siliciclastics.

I am extremely thankful for my education and the career opportunities that have brought me to a place where I enjoy coming to work. Every day there is a different problem to tackle. Sometimes it requires communicating with engineers and understanding other types of non-geo data, or sometimes I need to go on a field trip to an outcrop or a core lab to visualize what the rocks could look like in the subsurface. Or Maybe that day I make maps of the reservoir. It is forever changing in the geology profession.

About the author: Tania Campbell is a production geologist with Oxy Permian Enhanced Oil Recovery, a global corporation partnered with the Houston Museum of Natural Science’s Girls Exploring Math and Science (GEMS) program to help educate girls through hands-on science activities and outreach.

STEMS & GEMS: HMNS’ Erin Mills gives us the buzz on bugs

Editor’s Note: As part of our annual GEMS (Girls Exploring Math and Science) program happening February 21 2015, we conduct interviews with women who have pursued careers in science, technology, engineering, or math. This week, we’re featuring Erin Mills, Entomologist at the Cockrell Butterfly Center.

Erin Mills Cockrell Butterfly Center

HMNS: How old were you when you first become interested in science/technology/engineering and/or math?
Mills: I’ve been interested in Science as long as I can remember, particularly Life Science. I was always fascinated with creatures big and small.

HMNS: Was there a specific person or event that inspired you when you were younger?
My 7th grade Science teacher Mrs. Pierce-Mcbroom was an awesome science teacher! Picture a female Bill Nye! She had lots of exotic pets that she would bring into the classroom and she was very fun! My mother was also a huge inspiration. Whereas most moms squeal and squirm at the sight or even thought of creepy crawly creatures, they didn’t bother my mom one bit! She was fearless and encouraged me to explore the natural world and all of its residents. She was always very proud of me!

HMNS: What was your favorite science project when you were in school?
My mom helped me to make a mini tropical habitat. She helped me pick out plants that live in the tropics and in the end it looked beautiful! It was my first Science fair project and I got an A!

HMNS: What is your current job? How does this relate to science/technology/engineering/math?
As an Entomologist at the Cockrell Butterfly Center I get to work with some of the most amazing bugs from all around the world. Bugs are some of the most important organisms on the planet and my job involves a lot of educating people, young and old, about them and their importance to the ecosystem.

HMNS: What’s the best part of your job?
Mills: Getting to work with the live insects and other arthropods

HMNS: What do you like to do in your spare time?
Anything outdoors: hiking, walking, running, and playing with my little boy and showing him the natural world.

HMNS: What advice would you give to girls interested in pursuing a STEM career?
Keep your mind open to the thousands of possibilities there are with one of these careers. Ask lots of questions and learn as much as you can, and don’t be afraid or too shy to do what it takes to pursue whatever it is that interests you!

HMNS: Why do you think it’s important for girls to have access to an event like GEMS?
I think mentors play a huge part in helping people be successful. This event can help connect girls with mentors and that can have a tremendously positive impact on their futures!


Know a girl who loves science? Click here to learn more about how you can get involved with GEMS!