Energy: What’s Next?

With Election Day in full swing, our Energy blogger, Claire, takes a look at “The Good, The Bad and the Energetic” today, in a guest post over on the excellent Oil Rules blog. Here’s an excerpt from Part 1:

“The…election and rising gas prices have raised the topic of energy to a higher level of importance for most Americans. Whatever it takes to make us examine what is required to produce the energy we crave in this country is good because it causes us to consider our responsibilities to the world today and to future generations.

Theodore Roosevelt, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing left
Theodore Roosevelt:
conservationist.
Creative Commons License photo credit: sakraft1

Theodore Roosevelt, years ahead of his time, was an instrumental force in initiating wise conservation of our resources.

“In utilizing and conserving the natural resources of the Nation, the one characteristic more essential than any other is foresight… The conservation of our natural resources and their proper use constitute the fundamental problem which underlies almost every other problem of our national life.”

Address to the National Editorial Association,
Jamestown, Virginia, June 10, 1907.

The importance of the resources used for the production of energy show that Teddy Roosevelt was especially correct in predicting that conservation of resources would affect every other problem in our lives.”

Check out the full post for more information – including criteria for evaluating our options, so we can make a smart decision about what comes after oil. Check back for Parts 2 and 3 – coming soon.

Science Doesn’t Sleep (9.8.08)

145ps_01087.jpg
Bacteria loves milk.
Creative Commons License photo credit: IRRI Images

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

A NASA administrator insists he backs the upcoming retirement of the space shuttle (leaving the U.S. unable to send astronauts to the International Space Station)  - despite a leaked e-mail to the contrary. Oh – and, the BBC reports that Chinese astronauts (called yuhangyuan) will perform their first-ever spacewalk.

Got bacteria? New research indicates that you shouldn’t be washing your antibiotics down with milk.

Bad news for mathletes: using your brain might be making you fat.

NPR asks: Can physicists be funny? (The answer is YES.) Scientists at CERN are going through improv comedy training to help reassure the public that they’re not about to create a giant black hole that will swallow the Earth.

Arctic permafrost holds twice as much carbon as the atmosphere – making it a potential environmental threat. Good thing it’s not melting at a disturbingly fast pace.

Does the President need to be tech-savvy?