Go Stargazing! August Edition

Saturn is the only planet visible to the naked eye at night this August.  Face southwest at dusk and you’ll see Saturn near a star of similar brightness—Spica in Virgo.  Saturn is a bit to the right of Spica as you face southwest.   The ringed planet remains well placed for evening viewing and remains in the night sky until late September 2011.

Hubble Images Suggest Rogue Asteroid Smacked Jupiter
Creative Commons License photo credit: NASA Goddard Photo and Video

Mars and Jupiter are in the pre-dawn sky.  Jupiter, set against a background of very dim stars, dominates the southeastern pre-dawn sky and is due south at dawn by the end of the month.  Mars is dimmer and much lower in the east northeast.  It has fully emerged from the sun’s glare and will brighten slightly each morning. Venus is now out of sight.  Superior conjunction (alignment on the far side of the sun) is on August 16.

The Big Dipper is to the left of the North Star, with its handle pointing up.  From that handle, you can ‘arc to Arcturus’ and then ‘speed on to Spica’; those stars are in the west and southwest at dusk.  Antares, brightest star of Scorpius, the Scorpion, is in the south, with the ‘teapot’ of Sagittarius to its left.  Meanwhile, the Summer Triangle is approaching the zenith.  The stars of summer now dominate the evening sky.  In late evening, you can watch the Great Square of Pegasus rise in the east.

Moon Phases in August 2011:

1st Quarter                     August 6, 6:08 a.m.

Full Moon                       August 13, 1:57 p.m.

Last Quarter                  August 21, 4:56 a.m.

New Moon                      August 28, 10:03 p.m.

The annual Perseid Meteor Shower peaks this year on Saturday morning, August 13.  Unfortunately, the moon (full on the 13th) hides all but the very brightest meteors and thus spoils the show.  If you want to see just how many Perseids can outshine the moonlight, the best hours are from roughly 2 a.m. to dawn.

Go Stargazing! March Edition

Hubble Images Suggest Rogue Asteroid Smacked Jupiter
Creative Commons License photo credit:
NASA Goddard Photo and Video

Jupiter leaves the evening sky this month.  For now, you can still observe it in the west at dusk, where it sets by 8:25 on March 1.  It outshines all stars in the sky, so it’s easy to find.  Face west at dusk and look for the brightest thing there.  However, Jupiter is getting a little lower in the sky each evening.  You should be able to follow it until about the middle of the month.  By month’s end, Jupiter is lost in the sun’s glare.  On April 6, it is directly behind the sun from our perspective.

Mercury emerges from behind the sun this month and appears beside Jupiter before Jupiter fades from view.  On March 15, Mercury is about two degrees to the right of Jupiter as they both set in twilight.  As Jupiter becomes lost in the sun’s glare, Mercury remains visible low in the west at dusk for the rest of the month.

Venus remains a dazzling morning star.  It is getting lower in the sky as the angle between the solar system plane and the horizon gets shallower.  Face southeast at dawn, and you can’t miss it.

Saturn is in the southwest at dawn, getting lower in the southwest by month’s end.  This is because at the end of the month, Earth is about to pass between the sun and Saturn.  This alignment, called opposition, puts Saturn in the sky all night long; it rises in the east at dusk and sets in the west at dawn (the precise opposition date is April 3).  As a result, Saturn is also an evening object, rising in the east by 9:00 p.m. on March 1 and by dusk on the 31.

Mars, just past conjunction with the sun, remains lost in the sun’s glare all month.

A swath of brilliant winter stars continues to dominate evening skies.  These stars are now due south at dusk, but shift to the southwest later in the evening.  Orion, the Hunter, is almost due south.  His two dogs, represented by Sirius and Procyon, are to his left.  Above Orion is Taurus, the Bull with Aldebaran as its eye. Gemini, the Twins, are to Orion’s upper left.  Leo, the Lion, rises in the east.  The Big Dipper has now fully re-entered the evening sky; it is to the right of the North Star with the handle pointing down.

Below Sirius, just above the southern horizon, is a star second only to Sirius in brightness.  This is Canopus, which marks the keel (bottom) of the legendary ship Argo Navis.  Canopus is so far south, in fact, that most Americans never see it.  From the Gulf Coast, however, Canopus does rise.  March and March are the best months to see it in the evening.

Moon Phases in March 2011:

New Moon                              March 4, 2:46 p.m.

1st Quarter                             March 12, 5:45 p.m.

Full Moon                               March 19, 1:10 p.m.

Last Quarter                          March 26, 7:07 a.m.

At 6:21 p.m. CDT on Sunday, March 20, the sun is overhead at the Earth’s equator, giving everyone in the world the same amount of daylight.  This, then is the vernal equinox, the ‘official’ start of spring.  For us, days have been lengthening since December 21; by now daytime is almost as long as the night.  After March 20, daytime is longer than night for us.  For many people, however, wintry weather continues so long as arctic air masses remain in motion across North America, Europe, and Asia.

Winter time
Creative Commons License photo credit: cvanstane

People in the Southern Hemisphere had their longest days back in December; their days have since shortened to be about equal to the night.  After March 20, night is longer than day down there, so this is their autumnal (fall) equinox.

Sunday, March 13, is the second Sunday in March.  Therefore, Daylight Saving Time begins at 2 that morning (1:59:59 is followed by 3:00:00).  Don’t forget to set your clocks forward one hour on Saturday night, March 12!

Go Stargazing! February Edition

Jupiter!
Creative Commons License photo credit: Joshua Bury

Jupiter leaves the evening sky this month.  You can still see it during the next two weeks if you face southwest at dusk and look for the brightest point of light there. Jupiter sets by 7:30 as February opens, so you must look soon after dusk to see it.   However, Jupiter sets earlier and earlier and appears lower and lower to the horizon each February night, and soon disappears into the sun’s glare.  On Tuesday, Feb. 16, observers with a clear view of the horizon during twilight can try to see a very close conjunction of Jupiter and Venus, which is slowly moving out of the sun’s glare.  By the end of the month, Earth and Jupiter are on opposite sides of the Sun and Jupiter is therefore invisible to us.

Mars has become an evening object.  It is now already up in the east-northeast by dusk.  Mars already outshines all stars in the night sky except the very brightest (Sirius), and will continue to brighten throughout February.  On Jan. 29, Mars came to opposition as Earth passed between Mars and the sun, putting Mars in our sky all night long.  Earth now starts to pull ahead of Mars on its faster orbit.  As a result, Mars is slightly dimmer each night for the rest of 2010.  However, during February, Mars remains about as bright as the brightest stars, and thus remains easy to see.

Saturn is now high in the southwest at dawn.  Although not as bright as Mars this month, Saturn is brightening as it approaches its own opposition in March.

Joseph Nollekens (1737 - 1823) Castor and Pollux front (V&A 2007)
Castor and Pollux
Creative Commons License photo credit: ketrin1407

Dazzling Orion is high in the south, reminding us that winter is here.  His belt points up to Aldebaran, the eye of Taurus, the Bull.  The Dog Stars, Sirius and Procyon, are below Orion in the east.  Sirius is the brightest star we ever see at night.  Gemini, the Twins, are to Orion’s left as he rises (and to his upper left once they appear to the south).  Look for two stars of equal brightness less than 5 degrees (three fingers at arms’ length) apart.  These are Castor and Pollux, marking the twins’ heads.  High in the northeast is Capella, the sixth brightest star ever seen at night.  On February and March evenings, look below Sirius and a bit to its right for Canopus, the second brightest star we ever see at night. This star is in the keel (bottom) of the legendary ship Argo.  Canopus is so far south that most Americans never get to see it.  We, however, are far enough to the south that it barely rises for us, remaining low on the southern horizon.

Moon Phases in February 2010:

Last Quarter                  February 5, 5:50 pm
New Moon                      February 13, 8:52 pm
1st Quarter                     February 21, 6:42 pm 
Full Moon                       February 28, 10:37 am

The new moon of Feb. 13 is the second new moon after the winter solstice.  Accordingly, it marks the Chinese New Year, beginning the Year of the Tiger.  (Correct for the time zone difference, and you’ll see that the date is February 14 in China).

Chinese New Year - Dragon
Creative Commons License photo credit: ajagendorf25

Go Stargazing! March Edition

Venus leaves the evening sky in dramatic fashion this month.  Look west-southwest right as night falls for the brightest thing there except for the Moon.  Keep watching each clear night this month; you’ll see Venus noticeably lower to the horizon each passing day.  By March 20, Venus sets as twilight ends, and by the end of the month, it is gone.  When is the last day the month you can see it?  Venus, on its faster, inner orbit, has come around to our side of the Sun and will pass us on March 27.  Astronomers call this alignment inferior conjunction

(: Smiley Face Over Perth
Creative Commons License photo credit: rich115

In addition, Venus’ orbit is highly inclined to ours.  (The planets orbit almost, but not exactly, in the same plane.)  As a result, we often see Venus pass above or below the Sun at inferior conjunction rather that truly aligning with the Sun.  This time, Venus passes ‘above’ the Sun in our sky, giving us the chance to see it as both evening and morning star!  Do you have a clear horizon, without tall trees or buildings, to the east and west?  If so, then you can try observing Venus very low in the west at sunset and very low in the east the next morning.  It’s best to try this between March 24 and 27. 

Saturn is now up all night.  On March 8, Earth passes between the Sun and Saturn, putting the Sun and Saturn on opposite sides of the Earth.  In this alignment, called opposition, a planet rises at sundown and sets at sunup; it is visible literally all night long.  Saturn is nowhere near as bright as Venus, but it is in a relatively dim star field and therefore is just as easy to see.  Face east at dusk, south at midnight, or west at dawn to see it. 

Mars and Jupiter emerge from the Sun’s glare this month.  Jupiter, in the southeast at dawn, is the brightest thing in that part of the sky unless the Moon is nearby (as it is on March 22, 23, and 24).  Mars moves faster than Jupiter and therefore seems to ‘keep pace’ with the Sun’s apparent motion.  As a result, Mars remains close to the horizon at dawn much of the spring, and takes longer to fully emerge into the morning sky. 

M42 Orion
Creative Commons License photo credit: makelessnoise

Dazzling Orion is due south at dusk.  His belt points up to Aldebaran, the eye of Taurus, the Bull.  The Dog Stars Sirius and Procyon are below Orion in the east.  Sirius is the brightest star we ever see at night.  Look for a fairly bright star just to the right of Sirius and then drop your gaze straight down to the horizon. The bright star just above the horizon, possibly shining through trees, is Canopus, the second brightest star we see at night.  This star is so far south that it never rises for people north of 37 degrees north latitude (Houston is at just under 30 degrees north).  To Orion’s upper left are two stars of similar brightness less than five degrees apart.  These are Castor and Pollux, marking the heads of Gemini, the Twins.  Look in the east at dusk for stars in the shape of a backwards question mark, with a right triangle below that.  These stars are in Leo, the Lion.  Saturn rises in Leo.

Moon Phases in March 2009:

1st Quarter           March 4, 1:45 am
Full                       March 10, 9:37 pm
Last Quarter          March 18, 12:49 pm
New                      March 26, 11:07 pm

Time For... ?
Creative Commons License photo credit: bogenfreund

Sunday, March 8, is the second Sunday of March.  Therefore, we spring forward to Daylight Saving Time at 2 a.m. that morning.  (Clocks officially go from 1:59 a.m. to 3 a.m.)  Don’t forget to set your clocks one hour ahead Saturday night, March 7!

At 6:45 am on Friday, March 20, the Sun is directly overhead at the equator.  This is therefore the vernal (spring) equinox.  On this date, everyone has the same amount of daylight.  For us, day is now longer than night, and days will continue to lengthen until June.  In the Southern Hemisphere, it’s night that is getting longer.  For them, this is the autumnal equinox—the start of fall.