The Great Raise Houston – Feb. 28 at 7 p.m.

Since The Real World debuted in 1992 (currently in it’s 21st season – there’s a fact to make you feel old) people have been saying the “reality show” genre was a flash in the pan. Now, dramas and sitcoms are becoming endangered species, and we’ve moved (over almost 20 years) from The Bachelor to Rock of Love III – I guess we can say it’s a genre that’s here to stay.

And though most reality shows tend to get increasingly ridiculous – there is one that I love.

LOVE.

And it’s The Amazing Race.

Image Credit:
© dabawenya ©
(who’s ready for a hunt?)

Most shows leave you wondering – who would fight to date someone who’s also dating 30 other people? Who would let Simon Cowell pass judgement on them publicly? Who would willingly sign up for a show literally titled Wife Swap?

Not so with The Amazing Race. Who wants to white-water-raft in Chile, navigate with Magellan’s Map, or rappel down the face of a Portuguese cliff? Everyone. Because that’s awesome.

And now, the experience has come to town, in the form of “The Great Raise Houston” – a special that follows ten teams as they run, jump, dive, fly and speed through the city on a three-day, 350-mile trek. From kayaking on the bayou to skydiving to ax throwing, the contestants will rely on creativity and common sense to keep them in the race. Part of the trek is a visit to the Houston Museum of Natural Science!

Best of all, the teams competing in “The Great Raise Houston” will be raising funds for the Houston Food Bank – Kid’s Café and Casa de Esperanza. The second half airs tomorrow night at 7 p.m. – don’t forget to tune in!


“The Great Raise Houston” was created by Uchenna and Joyce Agu, the Houston couple who took home the $1 million prize on the 7th season of the CBS reality hit, “The Amazing Race.”


Looking Back…

In case you were wondering about notable science events that occurred the week of July 18th…

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Creative Commons License photo credit: disoculated

On July 19, 1963, Joe Walker flew a North American X-15 to a record height of 347,800 feet. Under international convention, this constitutes spaceflight. He was also the first man to fly into space twice. Joe Walker’s test flights were beneficial to NASA and the entire space program. It was only six years later that NASA successfully reached the moon.

“That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstong and Buzz Aldrin become the first men to set foot on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission. From start to finish, the entire Lunar mission took just over 8 days. (Coming soon: your chance to be a fly on the shuttle wall of this extraordinary mission.)
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On July 21, 1931, CBS’ New York City station began broadcasting the first regular, seven day a week television schedule in the U.S. By the end of the year, CBS was broadcasting for seven hours a day, seven days a week. Now you can buy a set of knives or a juicer through the Home Shopping Network twenty-four hours a day, every day.

On July 24, 1911, Hiram Bingham III rediscovered Machu Picchu, more commonly known as the “Lost City of the Incas.” The city was built in the 1450′s, but was abandoned only a hundred years later during the Spanish conquest.

Before Machu Picchu
Creative Commons License photo credit: icelight