About Vincent

Vincent is the Copywriter at HMNS.

Top 10 Tokens of Affection from the Museum Store for Valentine’s Day!

Can’t think of the perfect gift for your Valentine? We got you covered with 10 gift ideas for your sweetheart.Untitled-1

# 10 — Kris Nations X And O Stud Earrings


# 9 — Kris Nations Heart And Arrow Stud Earrings


# 8 — Eddie Borgo C Z Pave Bicone Hinged Rose Gold Cuff


# 7 — Swallow Heart Lock Ruby Necklace


# 6 — Ananda Khalsa Pink Tourmaline Ring


# 5 — Rebecca Lankford Hugs And Kisses Diamond Necklace

# 4 — Brassthread Kiss My Heart Necklace

# 3 — Mawi London Crystal Heart Spike Earrings


# 2 — Mirta Tummino Pink Sapphire Clover Necklace


# 1 — Delphine Leymarie Amour Heartbeat Tiny Double Necklace


Amazing Animals, Breathtaking Photography on Display Now at HMNS in Wildlife Photographer of the Year Exhibit

The Houston Museum of Natural Science is honored to again host the breathtaking beauty captured in Wildlife Photographer of the Year.

Founded in 1964 and organized by the Natural History Museum and BBC Worldwide, Wildlife Photographer of the Year is one of the longest and most prestigious photography competitions in the world. Now in its fiftieth year, the competition received over 40,000 submissions from amateur and professional photographers from nearly 100 countries, all of whom were competing for the prestigious title of Wildlife Photographer of the Year.


Every year, the best images submitted are selected to form theWildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition, and are exhibited at art galleries, museums, and science centers around the globe allowing millions of visitors to view the stunning images, helping to ensure that biodiversity and sustainability remain at the forefront of public awareness.

Since its inception, audiences across the world have responded to the splendor, drama, variety and importance of life on Earth captured in the images. Over the years, the exhibit has inspired a new generation of photographic artists to produce a visionary and expressive interpretation of nature. The subjects generate greater public interest in the natural world and conservation, raising understanding of wildlife photography as a mainstream art.

Featuring 100 awe-inspiring images, from fascinating animal behavior to breathtaking wild landscapes, Wildlife Photographer of the Year harnesses the power of photography to promote the discovery, understanding and responsible enjoyment of the natural world.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year is free for Museum members and with general admission.

Get ready for cuteness overload: Tiny Giants 3D showing now in the GST!

Learn about the amazing trials and tribulations of a mighty chipmunk and a daring mouse from their own tiny perspective in Tiny Giants 3D now showing in the Wortham Giant Screen Theatre!

Come on an extraordinary adventure into magical worlds beneath our feet that most of us never see – one where life is lived at an extraordinary intensive pace, where everything we know seems turned on its head. Experience the hidden kingdoms of the Enchanted Forest and the unforgiving desert of the Wild West. From BBC Earth, this is the story of a day in the life of two little heroes: a scorpion mouse and a chipmunk. For each of them this will be a day they never forget. It’s a story of drama, danger and courage, of insight and revelation, a journey to discover and understand a new and fascinating natural history. 


Wonder Women of STEM: Ada Lovelace, 19th century programmer

Editor’s Note: This post is the second in a series featuring influential women from STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) fields in the lead up to HMNS’ annual GEMS (Girls Exploring Math and Science) event, February 21, 2015. Click here to get involved! 

The modern tech industry is currently dominated by men — a problem with its origins in the 1980s. While many companies have begun to reconfigure their goals and diversify their staffs in order to be more inclusive, it wasn’t always this way.

In fact, many, if not most, of the functions modern computing has taken on, were originally thought of by a woman in the 1800s — a woman who wrote the first computer algorithm. 

This woman was Ada Lovelace, or Augusta Ada, Countess of Lovelace born in 1815 as the daughter of famed poet Lord Byron. It might seem strange that a poet’s daughter would turn “techie” as such, but Lovelace’s computational genius was undeniable and encouraged from a very young age. 

You see, her mother (who was apparently not very fond of Lord Byron) wanted her daughter to be as unlike her father as possible, and thereby stressed mathematics and science, and left out poetry, in her tutoring.

However, Lovelace’s inner poet could not be extinguished, manifesting itself in her beautifully artistic approach to her field, calling it “poetic sciences.” 

When she was 17, Lovelace was introduced her to Charles Babbage, who was working on a prototype for the Analytical Engine, one of the predecessors to electronic computers. 

Devised as a way to solve complex mathematical formulas, Ada created the first algorithm for the engine. However, she saw past this function, envisioning a future where the machine could perform a variety of tasks and questioned how technology and society interact and affect one another. On this, she said: 

“[The Engine] might act upon other things besides number, were objects found whose mutual fundamental relations could be expressed by those of the abstract science of operations, and which should be also susceptible of adaptations to the action of the operating notation and mechanism of the engine…

Supposing, for instance, that the fundamental relations of pitched sounds in the science of harmony and of musical composition were susceptible of such expression and adaptations, the engine might compose elaborate and scientific pieces of music of any degree of complexity or extent.”

While the plans for the Analytical Engine were never fully realized, Lovelace wrote scholarly papers on the theoretical machine, along with her algorithm, which proved vital for those building the first computer a century later.

HMNS is highlighting females that made contributions to STEM fields leading up to our annual GEMS (Girls Exploring Math and Science) event, February 21, 2015!

Girls Exploring Math and Science (GEMS) is an event that showcases some of the great things girls do with science, technology, engineering and math! Students can present a project on a STEM related subject for the chance to earn prize money for their school.

If you, or a student you know is interested, apply for a student booth today!

Want to know more about the wonder women of STEM?
Click here for the first post in the series, Wonder Women of STEM: Mary Anning, Fossil Hunter