Saturday is STEM/Nova Day for Scouts at HMNS!

Hey, Scouts! Spend the day at HMNS this weekend and work on earning your Nova Award during STEM/Nova Day! The Houston Museum of Natural Science is the perfect place to complete your badge requirements. Visit our permanent exhibit halls, watch a Burke Baker Planetarium or Wortham Giant Screen Theatre movie, and ask some of our docents your best science questions!


Cubs and Webelos can work on their requirements for the “Science Everywhere” or the “Down and Dirty” Nova Awards. Watch one of our films about geology, oceanography, or weather, and explore permanent exhibit halls like the Weiss Hall of Energy and the Morian Hall of Paleontology. Wolf Scouts can sign up for Digging in the Past, and Webelos can choose from Adventures in Science, or Earth Rocks! classes. Bear Scouts can take one of our fall classes to finish their Nova Award requirements. We’ll also have Investigation Stations in the Alfred C. Glassell, Jr. Hall (under the fish) so you can explore different scientific topics through hands-on activities!


Boy Scouts will also be able to fulfill some of their “Shoot!” Nova Award requirements. Visit the Burke Baker Planetarium or Wortham Giant Screen Theatre to watch a movie about weather, astronomy, or space technology. Stop by some of the Investigation Stations to participate in hands-on activities involving physics and engineering. (Please note that Boy Scouts will be unable to fulfill every requirement for the “Shoot!” Nova Award at this event.)

STEM/Nova Day will be from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 26. If you are taking a class to complete any Nova requirements, classes will run from 1 to 3 p.m. Scouts can also get field trip rates for the Burke Baker Planetarium and Wortham Giant Screen Theatre shows that day. Participation in STEM/Nova Day requires admission to the permanent exhibit halls. Become a member and get free admission to the permanent exhibit halls year-round!

We look forward to seeing scouts at the STEM/Nova Day at HMNS!

Color and Create for the Secret Ocean Art Contest!

The bright colors of life on the coral reef inspire artists all over the globe. How well does your art measure up? Show off your talent through the Secret Ocean Art Contest, and you could win free museum tickets and an artist feature on the big screen! Check out some of our ideas below and learn how to enter the contest before the Sept. 25 deadline.

In the saltwater world captured in Jean-Michel Cousteau’s Secret Ocean 3Dwe see many animals with bright colors and vibrant patterns, and struggle to find some of the animals hiding in plain sight. Coloration plays an important role to survival in most environments. Animals with appropriate coloration can be better at confusing predators, attracting mates, or blending in to catch the next meal. Every animal has its own approach to coloration, and they each use it for more than just beauty.

Dangerous distraction

The lionfish is known for its large elegant fins and the impressive venomous spines along its back, but the red-striped pattern of the lionfish makes it a fierce predator at the top of its food chain. The lionfish does not use its venomous spines to capture prey. The venom is meant to protect the lionfish from other predators, and it is quite successful! The bright pattern on its body warns predators that the lionfish is venomous. Its warning coloration may be the reason there are no known predators for the lionfish that were introduced into the Caribbean.


Flickr Creative Commons.

Bright beauty

The clownfish is also known for its distinct color pattern. Unlike the lionfish, clownfish coloration does not serve as a warning. Rather, it helps them avoid predation. The white stripes break up the body of the clownfish making it harder for another animal to see. Using stripes and spots in this manner is called disruptive coloration. The disruptive coloration on the clownfish can confuse a predator for just enough time and allow the clownfish to retreat safely into its anemone.


Flickr Creative Commons.

Clever camouflage

One of the best color patterns for animals is one that goes unnoticed entirely. It’s hard to catch an animal that you cannot find. The octopus is well known for its ability to change the color and texture of its skin to blend into its surroundings. This camouflage can help the animal escape predators as well as sneak up on unassuming prey. An octopus can also mimic rocks, algae and even coconuts to blend in to all sorts of environments.


Flickr Creative Commons.

Now, combine your artistic talent with your knowledge of coloration for our contest! To compete, print out a copy of the rules and the Secret Ocean art contest template, then create your masterpiece. You can use paint, crayons, sand, glitter, beads and almost anything you can think of to create a fish or octopus. Don’t forget to submit before the deadline, Sept. 25! The top pieces will win great prizes like tickets to the HMNS permanent exhibit halls or to a showing of Jean-Michel Cousteau’s Secret Ocean 3D at the Wortham Giant Screen Theatre. Your artwork could also be projected onto the big screen!

Give us your best shot! We’re looking forward to your colorful creations. Best of luck!

Mark Your Calendars for these events happening at HMNS 1/5/15-1/11-15


Two New Movies Added to Wortham Giant Screen Theatre Lineup 
Starting Monday, January 5

Tiny Giants 3D
Come on an extraordinary adventure into magical worlds beneath our feet that most of us never see – one where life is lived at an extraordinary intensive pace, where everything we know seems turned on its head. Experience the hidden kingdoms of the Enchanted Forest and the unforgiving desert of the Wild West. From BBC Earth, this is the story of a day in the life of two little heroes: a scorpion mouse and a chipmunk. Click here for more info. 

Deepsea Challenge 3D
As a boy, filmmaker James Cameron dreamed of a journey_ to the deepest part of the ocean. This film is the dramatic fulfillment of that dream. It chronicles Cameron’s solo dive to the depths of the Mariana Trench—nearly seven miles beneath the ocean’s surface—piloting a submersible he designed himself. The risks were astounding. The footage is breathtaking. Deepsea Challenge 3D is a celebration of science, courage, and extraordinary human aspiration. Click here for more info. 

Special Exhibit: Battleship Texas Ends Sunday
January 11
This special exhibition pays homage to the last dreadnought in existence in the world, the Battleship Texas, commissioned 100 years ago. The ship is a veteran of Veracruz (1914) and both World Wars, and is credited with the introduction and innovation of advances in gunnery, aviation, and radar. Click here for more info. 


This week @HMNS: Making physics cool and celebrating 25 years at the George

This series is about events happening at the Houston Museum of Natural Science. For more information about HMNS, our exhibits and programming, please visit


FILM SCREENING: Particle Fever 

Imagine being able to watch Franklin received his first jolt of electricity or Edison turn on the first light bulb!

Particle Fever gives you a front row seat to our generation’s most significant and inspiring scientific breakthrough as it happens the launch of the Large Hadron Collider, the biggest and most expensive experiment in the history of the planet. 10,000 scientists from over 100 countries join forces in pursuit of a single goal: to recreate conditions that existed just moments after the Big Bang and find the Higgs boson, potentially explaining the origin of all matter. 

Join Dr. Paul Padley, one of the Rice University professors who worked on the Higgs boson discovery on the Hadron Collider, for this one-night-only event.


MEMBERS EVENT: The George Observatory 25th Anniversary Celebration

Celebrate the George Observatory’s 25th anniversary and peer through the refurbished research telescope to see spectacular views of Saturn along with a variety of deep space objects. Cash bar and light refreshments.