Dead Reckoning: Part 2 of our Geocache Adventure

UPDATE: We have recieved comments from several of our treasure hunters asking whether the treasure had already been claimed. When we went to check on it – still there! – we realized a some additional information might be necessary – as well as a new (clearer) starting point. If you’re planning to try again (or for the first time) start here:

N 29 degrees, 43″ 18.5′
W 95 degrees, 23″ 25.5′

Everything else is still the same. Once you reach this starting location plot a course of 084 degrees magnetic, and take a number of paces equal to the license plate prefix of Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Keep in mind that people have different length strides, but this should put you within a few feet of the hidden treasure. Also, should there be any bushes or trees in your path as you walk the paces, simply sidestep them for a few steps, you can still get to the end location without trampling anything.

Your big hint is PLW.

Good hunting!

Mourning the Dearly Departed

August 24 is the last day to see our Geopalooza exhibit. This exhibit features a great many geological treasures: meterorites, trilobites, agates and of course geodes.

To commemorate the departure of this exhibit, and to see if our readers are as adventurous as I hope you are, I am posting these two related images. One is a small handfull of cut and cabochoned gemstones (left), and the other (below) is the GPS coordinate of where this cache can be found. That’s right – I have hidden a small amount of gemstones – and if you can find them, you can have them.

The gems are not buried. They are currently residing on public property. Finding them will not require dismantling fixtures or machinery. By my reckoning, they are a very short walk from the GPS coordinates listed. All that is needed to make these gems yours is a GPS unit.

I will even give you a hint and say that after you have found your gems, you will be close enough to the Museum that you can come compare your stones to the crystals in Geopalooza or the Mineral Hall. The number of paces needed to complete the “short walk” is indicated in the title of the blog, both in number and very close to heading (direction) you should walk. If you find the gems, leave us a comment below to let us know – and perhaps we can hide another set for someone else to find. 

There be pirates at the museum

Watch out because there be pirates at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, no, really there are.  As summer comes to a close and the beginning of school approaches, there is a band of brainy pirates lurking and learning in the basement of the Museum. 

Instead of menacing the high seas, these pirates are learning all about the science of the seas,  from building periscopes to making a working compass to constructing a working astrolabe and collecting treasure.  Our pirates also construct a working telescope and periscope and discover how boats float and all about the different parts of a ship, just to name a few things.

On Friday our brainy band of pirates board a land-ship (air-conditioned bus) to head for Galveston Island for a day of fun and adventure.  They tour the Tall Ship Elissa, explore the Texas Sea Port Museum, and even see a film about Galveston’s own pirate Jean Lafitte.

Check out these fun pics from camp.  Also, check in and let us know who’s your favorite pirate:  Mine is the famous female pirate Anne Bonny.