Shark Week turns 25: Our six ways to celebrate

It’s the most wonderful time of the year, guys and gals: Shark Week is back.

After falling deep down the wormhole of the Summer Olympics (or as we like to call it, the Swimmer Olympics), it’s nice to have something else sleek and muscular to watch in the water.

So in honor of this horrific holiday season of sorts, here are six ways to celebrate Shark Week, starting Sunday, August 12:

1. Make a ridiculous watermelon sculpture, and try not to scare the bejeezus out of your kids.

Shark Week 2012

2. Imagine if sharks could fly and never sleep again.

Shark Week 2012

3. Imagine sharks had movie star teeth and feel better.

Shark Week 2012

4. Have mixed emotions about this photo:

Shark Week 2012

5. Be glad this guy’s extinct:

Megalodon Jaws

6. Learn more about the fiercest shark that ever lived and rent Mega Shark Versus CrocosaurusJust kidding — visit our new Hall of Paleontology to see a cast jaw, spectacular paleo art by Julius Csotonyi, and a compelling display of the jaw with the prey it’s poised to consume.

Happy Shark Week!

What a Croc!

Today’s guest blogger is Neal Immega. He has a Ph.D. in Paleontology and is a Master Docent here at HMNS. In his post below – originally printed in the Museum’s volunteer newsletter– Neal discusses the Geosaurus, a fossil featured in our exhibition Archaeopteryx: Icon of Evolution.

The Houston Museum of Natural Science has a new exhibit, “Archaeopteryx: Icon of Evolution” that features the best Archy ever.  Do not let that blind you, though, to the other critters on display. One of these is the best marine crocodile anywhere, a Geosaurus with an exciting evolutionary story all its own. These animals have a worldwide distribution from Brazil to Germany, but this specimen is the most complete, and shows the soft parts. Ah, the preservation of fossils in the Solnhofen limestone is amazing.

Let’s see what observations we can make from the skeleton and what conclusions we can draw. Look at this picture and get an overall impression of the fossil. The label says it is a croc, but is it? It does not look like any croc I have ever seen.

Complete Geosaurus skeleton, with skin impressions, from the Solnhofen limestone.
Geosaurus skull showing croc dentition

Head: The front end certainly looks like a modern crocodile head. The teeth are conical and striated, with the typical croc dentition:  teeth are located inside and outside the jaw line, and there are large teeth half way down the jaw.  Modern crocs use them for breaking turtle shells (see the YouTube video referenced below).

Tail: Ok, so it is a croc but it does have a very strange tail. Let’s look more closely at the tail to see if there is any support for the decision the preparator made to indicate a tail like a shark’s.

The faint skin impressions support
interpretation as a shark-like tail.

The discolored rock strongly suggests that the tail does have a shark outline, unlike that of all known modern crocodilians. Even better, compare the caudal processes (bumps on the top of the vertebra) in the area of the fin to those farther up the spine.  The processes in the tail fin area are longer and reverse orientation: they point toward the head, possibly as support for the fin. The fin is real!

Armor: This croc does not have any! There are no osteoderms (bony plates inside the skin) anywhere. The osteoderms in modern crocs do not provide complete coverage and thus are not much use as armor; however, a modern croc has muscles between its osteoderms that can stiffen up the skin during rapid land movements.  Apparently Geosaurus got along without them.

Legs: The arms are very short in proportion to the legs, quite unlike modern crocs.

Salt Gland: Many animals have glands to secrete sodium chloride because they live in or on life from the ocean and eat way to much salt. This animal is said to have chambers in the skull for a salt gland, but I cannot see it. I guess I will take their word* for it. A modern croc has a salt gland in its tongue while many birds have theirs in the skull.

Analysis: Modern crocs are slow swimmers and, thus, ambush predators. A shark-like tail suggests this was a higher speed predator. A modern croc has about 5% of its weight in osteoderms and their absence would improve the water speed at the expense of land speed. I think we have caught this croc species in the transition stage of becoming a true marine predator. It still had clawed limbs to crawl out on the land (to mate and lay eggs) but their smaller size would certainly help reduce drag. If this evolutionary path had continued, the croc’s descendants might have ended up looking like Ichthyosaurs, air-breathing reptiles that gave live birth and looked remarkably like modern dolphins. Remember, a saltwater croc in Australia is called a marine crocodile, but it does not have many adaptations to live in the marine environment besides a salt gland in its tongue.

An Ichthyosaur is a reptile completely adapted to a marine environment.
What happens when a Steneosaurus trys to
ambush an Allosaurus at the water hole

There are other crocs found in the Solnhofen limestone, including long-legged land crocs, dwarf ones, and a substantially armored one, Steneosaurus, featured by Dr. Bakker in this wonderful drawing.

To read more about the Geosaurus, check out Dr. Bakker’s blog.

References:

Wikipedia:  Criosaurus , Dakosaurus, Geosaurus
A nice discussion of aquatic crocs is at  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cricosaurus

Modern croc using those teeth on a turtle: “ahmedsadat” posting on YouTube, 2008, “Crocodile eats turtle”,  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cSKAXOFvi6c

*Salt glands – it is claimed that the skulls have a chamber for salt glands see Fernández and Gasparini, 2008, Naturwissenschaften. 2008, 95(1):79-84. Epub 2007 Aug 22. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17712540

Dwarf crocs from the Solnhofen limestone, page 36 in Wellnhofer, 2009, Archaeopteryx, Icon of Evolution, Verlag Dr. Friedrick Pfeil.

All pictures by Neal Immega except the Dino/Croc fight which is by Dr. Bakker.

The Animals of Solnhofen – Geosaurus

Our Archaeopteryx show has bedazzling fossils – the only Archaeopteryx skeleton in the New World, complete with clear impressions of feathers. Plus frog-mouthed pterodactyls, fast-swimming Sea Crocs, and slinky land lizards. Today we learn about the Geosaurus.

Geosaurus – Shark-Tailed Sea Croc
Speediest of the ocean-going crocodilians

Some creatures of the Late Jurassic lagoon were up & coming evolutionary clans – the teleosts, for example, were just beginning their takeover of the marine ecosystem. Other groups were Darwinian ultra-conservatives, living fossils in the Jurassic, changing slowly or not at all. The Chimaeras are a fine example.

And then there were a few very special cases – Late Jurassic critters that had reached the apogee of Natural Selection, the highest development of their race. Best representative of this phenomenon:

The Super-Swimmer Croc, Geosaurus.

The earliest crocs of the Triassic were land animals, roughly fox-sized with long legs. In the Early Jurassic, crocs went into rivers and lagoons.  That’s not a surprise. All living crocodilians swim well in freshwater, and a few – the Florida Croc and the Australian Salt Water Croc – will go out beyond the surf and navigate between oceanic islands.

But…..no modern-day croc is super-specialized for life in the high seas. None have the double-lobed tail of the sort we see in big, fast sharks, like the White Shark. Open-water sharks have a characteristic double-lobe tail. The vertebral column takes a sharp bend upwards to support the upper lobe of the tail. The lower lobe is made of tough skin and connective tissue. You can see the double-lobed tail configuration in our Archaeopteryx show in the hybodont sharks, a family common in the Jurassic.

To compete with such speedy sharks, a croc would have to evolve a double lobed tail. No crocs did – except one extraordinarily graceful clan, the geosaurs.

Our exhibit is graced with one of the finest geosaur specimens ever dug. This awesome Solnhofen skeleton demonstrates how evolution had transformed a “normal” river & lagoon crocodile into a reptilian torpedo, an open water predator that matches a shark in efficiency.

Geosaur evolution made a sacrifice unusual among the crocodilians – it traded in armor for velocity. All early crocs from the Triassic  and earliest Jurassic had thick bone plates over the back and neck and all over the throat and belly. All modern day crocs too carry extensive armor plate. This armor is useful when crocs are attacked by land predators or by other crocs. Most of the sea-going crocs of the Jurassic and Cretaceous kept some armor. Case in point: armor was carried by the teleosaurs, big  sea-crocs who were the apex predators at Solnhofen and most other sites in the Mid and Late Jurassic.  There is excellent evidence that large Jurassic dinosaur meat-eaters did indeed attack teleosaurs.

The geosaurs went a different way. They went skinny-dipping.

Geosaur skin was totally devoid of bone armor plates. They were naked. This development made the geosaur body lighter and more flexible.

Fast-swimming demands a specialized flipper for steering. The “normal” croc has long front legs and very long hind legs. The hind legs have wide webbed feet and assist the tail in propulsion underwater. All modern crocodilians and most fossil species keep this arrangement.

The geosaur limb equipment evolved in a unique way. Those long, strong hind legs were retained. But the fore-limbs were transformed into short flippers that worked like the diving planes of a submarine. No other croc clan did this with their front limb.

Impressive….but the outstanding geosaur specialization was the tail. “Normal crocs” have a deep, strong tail that bends down just a little bit at the end. The geosaurs went far beyond “normal” – they evolved a tail almost identical in profile to that of a modern tiger shark or a Jurassic hybodont. The geosaur tail possessed  two lobes, one bigger than the other in shark-fashion. 

Take a good look at our geosaur…..notice something strange?

The tail is upside down!  The vertebral column bends down, not up the way it does in sharks. Mummified geosaurs show that the upper lobe was made from tough skin and connective tissue, just like the lower lobe of sharks. The hydrodynamics of the upside-down tail worked just as well as the right-side-up shark tail.

Here’s a wonderful example of how evolution works: Natural Selection is opportunistic. It operates on what is already there. “Normal crocs” already had a slight down bend of the vertebral column.  For “normal crocs” to evolve a right-side-up version of a shark tail was almost impossible. But evolution took the simpler path by emphasizing the downward bend and then adding the upper lobe.

No croc of any age matched the swimming efficiency of geosaurs (although the Cretaceous Hyposaurus, from my home state of New Jersey came close). Most other croc groups are distant seconds. Therefore, the Late Jurassic was the high point of croc-natatory prowess (look it up;  “natatory”, a good adjective).

Why? Why didn’t some later croc group evolve upside-down shark tails as specialized as those of geosaurs?  We don’t know. My guess is that sharks evolved so fast in the Cretaceous that crocs were pushed out of the open-water/fast-swimming niches.

One more thought – geosaurs probably had to crawl onto sandy beaches to build nests and lay eggs. Their tiny flipper-like fore limbs would have been a big disadvantage – mom geosaurs must have been far more vulnerable to land predators than “normal crocs.”

Sharks are our friends!

Great White Shark Cage Diving
Creative Commons License photo credit: hermanusbackpackers

When I was in fifth grade, I was all about sharks. My favorite book was about sharks; my father even woke me up on school nights to see the shark specials on TV. I didn’t realize then that my 10 year old peers did not share my love or fascination with these creatures of the deep. Now, however, I do see that people are unnecessarily afraid of sharks. I think it’s about time a few more people disregard the scary myths, and start learning how awesomely-cool they are!

*Sharks have been around since before the dinosaurs, more that 300 million years. They have changed little over time and are sometimes called living fossils.

*Sharks’ skin was used to polish wood before the invention of sandpaper. It is covered in teeth-like projections called denticles. Most sharks’ dermal denticles point uniformly towards their tail. The exception to this is the Basking shark, whose denticles point every which-way! Some Norwegians line the bottoms of their boots with Basking shark skin to help with traction on slippery, wet surfaces.

Giant Great White Shark
Megalodon Jaw
Creative Commons License photo credit: Ryan Somma

*The extinct Megalodonwas the largest shark to ever exist. It had teeth the size of a human hand. As a sidebar here, I was out at a conference touting the wonders of the Museum and showing off some impressive fossils, one of which being a shark’s tooth – not a megalodon, but still impressive. I was holding it for a teacher to see its serrated edge and it actually cut open my finger. Who else can say they were bitten by a million’s-of-years-old shark?!

*Great white sharks live about 25 years. They do not start reproducing until they are around 20, and only have around 2 litters of 6-7 pups in their lifetime. Some scientists believe there are only around 10,000 in the world. As an apex predator, they are at the tops of the food chain and are needed to maintain balance in their respective ecosystems.

*Some sharks only grow to be 8 inches long!

baby whale shark
Creative Commons License photo credit: Drew And Merissa

*The largest shark today is the Whale Shark, which can grow up to 50 or 60 feet long. Don’t worry, though, they’re filter feeders that eat plankton!

*More than 375 species of shark have been discovered so far; less than a dozen of these are dangerous to humans. Also, 90% of all shark attacks, of which there are around 100 per year, end in the victim’s survival. This is because humans are not sharks intended prey. They take a taste – the sharks’ equivalent of sampling the menu - and spit out what turned out not to be a fish or a seal.

As you can see, sharks are not the vicious predators driven by blood lust that popular culture has made them out to be. Just respect them, and try not to dress up like a seal when you go swimming off the coast of South Africa. (Just kidding.) Have no fear of our finned friends!