New Addition to the Cockrell Butterfly Center!

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Phyllium giganteum
Creative Commons License
photo credit: emills1

Today was an exciting day here at the Butterfly Center, as we welcomed a new species, Phyllium giganteum. This is a type of walking stick or phasmid that is native to Southeast Asia. We have a relative here already, Phyllium celebicum. We have enjoyed them immensely as they are very attractive on display and calm enough to go out with our Bugs on Wheels program and visit children. People are absolutely taken aback by how much they resemble a leaf, and most visitors are drawn to this particular insect since it resembles such a harmless object.

Well, if you were blown away by our original leaf mimics, hold on to your hats and meet Phyllium gigateum! While celebicum can reach a modest 2-3 inches, giganteum is an impressive 4-5 inches long! The flaps on skin surrounding their legs and abdomen are very broad with brown edges that match a dying leaf.  You really need to meet these guys in person!

Well, I should say girls. This species is parthenogenic in captivity, meaning they don’t need to mate to have babies. Males are rarely seen, even in the wild. Each female can lay a couple hundred eggs which take about 5 -6 months to develop.  The eggs are dropped to the ground by the female who dares not leave the safety of the canopy. When the nymphs hatch, they scurry up the tree, hopefully fast enough to avoid being on someone’s menu.

You may be wondering why these phasmids have such a camo-advantage while other harmless insects are much easier to spot. If an insect is lacking in the camo department, you can bet it has one of many other safety features including: being able to run or fly very quickly (cockroach), having  a very hard exoskeleton or one covered in spines (beetle), being poisonous or distasteful to predators (lubber grasshopper), having the ability to emit or even project a noxious chemical (swallowtail caterpillar), or the ability to mimic something dangerous or show a scary display(giant prickly stick). An insect’s life is pretty much all about escaping predators among other dangers of the natural world! Phyllium can do nothing else mentioned above, so it’s all about the camouflage for them!

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a giganteum nymph
Creative Commons License photo credit: emills1

Caring for these insects is easy. I only have to meet their basic needs of food, warm temperature, and high humidity. Luckily, they will eat a variety of plants that can easily be found right here in Houston. Since these insects are parthenogenic, raising them should be a snap! We hope to have them as a permanent fixture at the Butterfly Center for years to come.

I hope you will come see them on display or be excited to have one visit your child’s classroom in the very near future. Fall is upon us now and winter will be here before you know it, so bugs everywhere will be chilling out for the season, not to be seen again until spring. So if you want to see some great bugs, native and exotic, pay us a visit! Until next time, happy bug watching!