The heart of the world: The star of Jerusalem 3D talks about her hometown and seeing herself on the Giant Screen for the first time

Farah Ammouri and her brother Mohammed after viewing Jerusalem 3D in our Giant Screen Theatre for the first time.

If you haven’t yet heard the mountains of praise for the wildly stunning Jerusalem 3D movie, climb out from under your rock right now. This epic film from National Geographic Entertainment whisks and winds you through one of the world’s most important cities with arguably one of the most storied pasts of all time.

But in a city as multifaceted and layered as Jerusalem, how do you do justice to its many tales without focusing on its politics?

Well, you hear it from the perspectives of those who live it every day.

The production team of Taran Davies, George Duffield, and Daniel Ferguson said in a press release, “Our goal is to look at the roots of the universal attachment to Jerusalem: Jewish, Christian and Muslim. We hope the juxtaposition of these different religions and cultures — all with profound spiritual and historical connections to the city — will reveal how much Jews, Christians and Muslims have in common and inspire all of us to better understand each other.”

So the team asked three girls — a Christian, a Jew, and a Muslim — to lead them around their city for a day. Each girl revealed surprisingly different perspectives — perspectives that form the backbone of Jerusalem 3D‘s magic.

Farah Ammouri, an 18-year-old Muslim, was one of these young women. She spent her entire life in Jerusalem, and she currently attends college in Dallas. We sat down to talk with Ammouri after she traveled to Houston for her very first viewing — ever! — of Jerusalem 3D.

So this was the first time you’d seen the full movie. What did you think?

It was awesome. I loved it. Most of my own footage I’d seen — they’d shown me the clips of what was happening and how they were filming — so I was up-to-date on how it was going to be. But I didn’t see [any of the other girls'] footage; [Director Daniel Ferguson] only showed me mine.

How did you end up in the movie anyway?

First of all, I’m not an actress, obviously. [laughs] I went to a Catholic school, and our nun asked for girls whose families originate from Jerusalem to be interviewed for a movie. A lot of my good friends were auditioning for the movie. It was awkward for awhile, being selected out of a lot of girls that you know. I auditioned in October and I found out in January of the next year. It was a shock; I didn’t know what to expect. [Ferguson] told me about the movie; that it was going to be about religion but nothing political, and I was fascinated by the idea.

You didn’t want to be a part of it because you have acting aspirations?

Nooooo. [giggles] The girls who casted for the movie … we’re all going into something scientific. I have no aspirations to become an actress.

Did you know either of the other girls [Nadia Tadros, from a Greek Orthodox and Catholic family, and Revital Zacharie, a Jew] before the movie?

I knew the Christian girl [Nadia Tadros]. She’s really good friends with me; she used to go to my school and graduated two years before me. I didn’t know she was a Christian girl, and once I knew, we started talking to each other even more. She helped me a lot [throughout the filming of the movie]; we would give each other mental support and encourage each other.

Has your life changed at all as a result of the film?

It has given me experience. I’ve met a lot of new people, and I’ve learned a lot. My personality has gotten stronger from the movie. Imagine seeing yourself walking down the stairs [referring to a scene in Jerusalem 3D], and everyone looking at you and they are trying to tell them not to look at you. When they don’t look at the camera, they’ll be looking at me, and they tell them, “Don’t look at the girl; act normal.” It’s funny.

How do you view your relationship with Jerusalem now that you’re in the United States?

I’m a bit homesick. I do want to go back to live. I came here to study Genetic Engineering and it’s really hard to study that in Jerusalem. After that, I really want to go back home to my family.

Explore the cherished land of Jerusalem in our Giant Screen Theatre. Get your tickets to Jerusalem 3D.

On the first day of HMNS…a new exhibit debuts

Ring-oil lamp, 1st century B.C.E
On display in The Birth of Christianity:
A Jewish
Story
starting today.

The Birth of Christianity: A Jewish Story, a new special exhibition, makes its world premiere today, on the first day of HMNS. And that’s just the beginning – we’ve got 11 more days coming up, with great ideas for family fun this holiday season. You can check them all out now, at our spiffy new 12 Days of HMNS web site – or watch them roll out here until Christmas Eve.

For the first day of HMNS, we’re featuring our brand new exhibition, The Birth of Christianity: A Jewish Story - opening today. In the exhibit, you’ll embark on an adventure that spans the three centuries leading up to the birth of Jesus Christ, and the first decades after that – as the new religion of Christianity began to take shape.

Through a diverse array of artifacts, experience Jewish life during the reigns of Alexander the Great and the infamous King Herod. Return to the days of the Jewish War against the Romans and the stirring story of Masada, and learn the significance of Jewish burial customs. Finally, observe the dawn of the Christian Era. Along the way, marvel at ancient scrolls, objects and artifacts – such as one of the original Dead Sea Scrolls; original New Testament manuscripts, including an excerpt from the Gospel of Luke that contains the Christmas story; a large-scale, stone model of Jerusalem during the Second Temple period; and much more.

We’ve also developed an optional audio guide to go along with the exhibit, that allows you to explore what you see in greater depth. The voice of Flavius Josephus, a 1st century Jewish historian who survived the destruction of the temple of Jerusalem and lived during the development of early Christianity, is your guide through the exhibit. You can hear a preview of the audio guide here.

And, in case you missed it in our earlier post – in the video below, you can see guest curator Matthias Henze discuss how the artifacts gathered in this premiere exhibition are “the closest we can get to the historical Jesus,” how important it is to understand the “Jewish roots of early Christianity;” and the many commonalities these two religious traditions share to this day.

Learn more about The Birth of Christianity: A Jewish Story:
Ancient artifacts are delicate – but they’re sometimes very heavy. See how the exhibit came together.
Take a preview Walk Through the Exhibition online.
Get a sneak-listen of the new audio guide, developed specially for this exhibition, and based on the latest archaeological evidence.

Coming Dec. 12 – The Birth of Christianity: A Jewish Story

When did Christianity begin and what do we know about its origins? Did it begin with Jesus? And, what do we know about him? During the 20th century, a number of spectacular archeological discoveries in the land of Israel have greatly increased our knowledge of ancient Israel, culture and lifestyles.

When The Birth of Christianity: A Jewish Story, a new special exhibition, opens at the Houston Museum of Natural Science on Dec. 12, you’ll have a chance to explore these new discoveries for yourself, through the display of ancient scrolls, objects and artifacts. In the following video, Guest Curator Matthias Henze, Ph.D., discusses how the artifacts gathered in this premiere exhibition are “the closest we can get to the historical Jesus:”

Guest Curator Matthias Henze, Ph.D., Chair in Biblical Studies at Rice University, is a foremost scholar in The Dead Sea Scrolls, as well as the diverse eschatological branches of Early Judaism, including the Qumran community; Enochic Judaism; and nascent Christianity. In the video above, he also discusses how important it is to understand the “Jewish roots of early Christianity;” and the many commonalities these two religious traditions share to this day.

Artifacts on display will include one of the original Dead Sea Scrolls; original New Testament manuscripts, including an excerpt from the Gospel of Luke that contains the Christmas story; a large-scale, stone model of Jerusalem during the Second Temple period; and an ossuary bearing the inscription “Alexander, son of Simon of Cyrene.” According to the New Testament Gospels, Simon of Cyrene was forced to bear Jesus’ cross on his way to be crucified. However:

“What makes this exhibition so compelling…are not the objects alone. It is the story we are telling that brings the objects to life,” said Henze. “For example, an oil lamp remains just that – unless the visitor makes the connection that this object was used during the time the King Herod, who expanded the Second Temple complex in Jerusalem and is known from the New Testament for the notorious massacre of innocent babies.”

Judaism and Christianity are two of history’s most influential religions – discover their stories, and the connections between them, in The Birth of Christianity: A Jewish Story, on display Dec. 12 – April 12, 2009.

Happy New Year!

The New Moon of Monday, September 29, is an important one to many people of the world. In the Hebrew Calendar, it marks Rosh Hashanah (literally, ‘head of the year’) which is the beginning of year 5769. On Tuesday night, September 30, Muslims across the world will see the first slender crescent of this lunar cycle. That will mark the end of Ramadan and the beginning of the next month, Shawwal. 1 Shawwal is ‘Eid ul Fitr, one of the greatest holidays in the Islamic calendar. This week, then, is a good time to think about the Moon, why it’s here, how it orbits, and how we have used it to measure time.

Moon and stars
Creative Commons License photo credit: joiseyshowaa

Unlike our months, Hebrew and Islamic months begin with the New Moon. Because twelve lunar months add to only 354 days, less than the 365.25 day solar year, an extra month is occasionally needed to keep the months roughly aligned with the seasons. In a 19 year cycle, years 3, 6, 8, 11, 14, 17, and 19 have the extra month. The year that is ending, 5678, is number 11 in its cycle and was a leap year.

Interestingly, the Jewish year has two ‘beginnings’. Tishrei (the month which begins now) is the first month of the civil calendar, and the month where 5678 becomes 5679. However, it is actually the seventh month of the religious calendar, which begins at Nisan (the month of Passover).

The Islamic calendar functions slightly differently. Its months begin with the first visible crescent low in the west at dusk, which is not with the actual New Moon. Keep in mind that at New Moon, the Moon is in line with the Earth and Sun, and the entire near side of the Moon has nighttime (and is therefore dark). The New Moon is visible, therefore, only if it blocks the Sun during an eclipse.

Since this New Moon occurs early Monday morning, the 29th, we expect it to be visible by Tuesday evening, the 30th. Observant Muslims, then, will continue to fast in daylight hours Monday and Tuesday. Upon seeing the Moon Tuesday night, they will know that Ramadan has become Shawwal, and they may break their fast on Wednesday.

Due to early controversy as to which years would have it, Muhammad outlawed the 13th month that kept Islamic months tied to the seasons. As a result, Ramadan (and each other month in that calendar) begins 11 days earlier each year according to our Gregorian calendar.

The Moon is Earth’s only natural satellite, orbiting our planet once every 27.3 days. However, a cycle of moon phases (say, from New Moon to the next New Moon), takes 29.54 days. This is because the Earth itself is moving during each 27.3 day Moon orbit. Since it is much easier to observe the Moon’s changing phase cycle than to observe the Sun directly, the 29.54 day phase cycle was the basis of many ancient calendars. Words for ‘moon’ and ‘month’ are related in English and are identical in many other languages. There is some evidence that our word ‘moon’ is ultimately related to an Indo-European word for ‘measure.’ Given how long we’ve measured time by the Moon, it is easy to take its presence for granted.

Released to Public: Jupiter Montage (NASA)
Creative Commons License photo credit: pingnews.com

However, our Moon is quite remarkable in several ways. Moons in our solar system are generally much smaller than the planet they orbit. Jupiter and Saturn, for example, are about 25 times bigger across than their biggest moons. Earth, though, is only 3.67 times the diameter of our Moon. Also, moons usually orbit in the same plane as their planet’s equator. Our Moon, though, orbits within about 5 degrees of Earth’s orbital plane, called the ecliptic, which is not the plane of the equator since Earth is tilted 23.5 degrees on its axis.

This leads most astronomers to believe that the Moon did not form with the Earth, but is the result of a collision with with an object roughly the size of Mars. According to this theory, the impactor (sometimes called ‘Theia’) struck a glancing blow on the Earth and was completely destroyed, and the Moon formed from the debris of Theia’s and Earth’s mantles.

This impact is what left Earth with a Moon much larger than what a planet Earth’s size would normally have, and left that Moon near Earth’s orbital plane (where the impact occured). Our relatively big moon has crucial effects not only on our tides, but also on the stability of Earth’s tilt.

Earth’s orbital tilt of about 23 and a half degrees as it goes around the Sun causes the seasons. The axis precesses, describing an aparent circle roughly every 26,000 years, but the amount of tilt (obliquity) stays nearly the same. Because the Moon acts a counterweight, the obliquity varies only between 22.1 degrees and 24.5 degrees over about 41,00 years (we are now at 23.44 degrees and decreasing). Even this orderly variation, called the Milankovitch cycle, is enough to influence our Ice Ages. Imagine the impact on Earth’s climate if there were no Moon, and the obliquity varied chaotically. This is exactly what happens at Mars, where the tiny moons Phobos and Deimos are not massive enough to influence Mars’ tilt.

Public Domain: Apollo 8 Looks at the Moon (NARA/NASA)
Creative Commons License photo credit: pingnews.com

One thing our Moon does have in common with most others is that it orbits the Earth and rotates on its own axis at the same rate. This is called ‘synchronous rotation’ and it occurs because the Moon is not exactly uniform in composition. From the time the Moon formed, the slightly heavier side was attracted to the Earth. Over time, this effect de-spun the Moon until it attained synchronous rotation. The Moon’s gravitational attraction also de-spins the Earth, although much more slowly as the Moon is less massive. As it does so, the Moon moves slightly farther from the Earth (just over 3 cm per year). The Moon is now 1.5 meters farther away that it was when Apollo astronauts went there. Don’t worry, though, by the time the Moon is far enough away to escape, the Sun will have become a red giant and swallowed both Earth and Moon anyway.

What is the shape of the Moon’s trajectory around the Sun? Perhaps not what you’d expect.

So, I encourage every one to watch for the reappearance of the Moon in the evening sky this week, even if you aren’t celebrating a New Year or an ‘Eid. The Earth’s companion gives all of us something to appreciate.