Distinguished Lecture: Merge art and science in an exclusive Giant Screen showing of Chasing Ice

The Extreme Ice Survey merges art and science to give a “visual voice” to Earth’s changing ecosystems. Extreme Ice Survey imagery preserves a visual legacy, providing a unique baseline — useful in years, decades and even centuries to come — for revealing how climate change and other human activity impacts our air, water, forests and wildlife.

Chasing IceEIS field assistant Adam LeWinter on NE rim of Birthday Canyon, atop feature called “Moab.” Greenland Ice Sheet, July 2009. Black deposit in bottom of channel is cryoconite. Birthday Canyon is approximately 150 feet deep.

One aspect of Extreme Ice Survey’s work is a portfolio of single-frame photographs celebrating the beauty, art and architecture of ice. The other aspect of the survey is time-lapse photography. Currently, 27 cameras are deployed at 18 glaciers in Greenland, Iceland, the Nepalese Himalaya at Mount Everest, Alaska and the U.S. Rocky Mountains. These cameras record changes in the glaciers every half hour of daylight year round, yielding approximately 8,500 frames per camera per year. The time-lapse images are then edited into stunning videos that reveal how fast climate change is transforming large regions of the planet.

You can witness the hauntingly beautiful videos that compress years into seconds and capture ancient mountains of ice in motion as they disappear at a breathtaking rate in the film Chasing Ice. The vivid images of the majestic ice caps slowly melting away are set to an Academy-Award nominated soundtrack featuring Scarlett Johansson.

Chasing IceLeWinter ice climbing in Survey Canyon, Greenland

Chasing Ice features geologist, mountaineer and award-winning photographer James Balog, who is director of the Extreme Ice Survey and founder of Earth Vision Trust.

Join oceanography and climate change researcher Dr. John B. Anderson of Rice University for a one-night-only screening of Chasing Ice at the Houston Museum of Natural Science on June 18 at 6:30 p.m. This is the only digital, giant-screen showing of Chasing Ice in Houston.

WHAT: HMNS Film Screening of Chasing Ice
WHEN: Tuesday, June 18, 6:30 p.m.
HOW MUCH: Tickets $18, HMNS Members $12

Click here for advance tickets.

Ice Planet: Earth

There has been much discussion and confusion about global climate change. With an upcoming lecture and planetarium show on the topic, you have an opportunity to discover the facts and whether or not you should be concerned about the climate. This month we invite you to learn more about ice and glaciers, and the effect these have on our planet.

Ice Planet: Earth

On Wednesday, May 26 at 6:30 p.m. Dr. Mark Fahnstock will discuss the changes of our planet’s ice cover, specifically how it has changed over the past year, decade, and century. Dr. Fahnstock, who studies the glaciers of Greenland and the Antarctic, explains his research to the public. Don’t miss his lecture and the chance to learn more about global warming and our planet’s weather.

Ice Worlds

If you are interested in global climate change, the Poles are the place to watch because changes there can have a dramatic effect on the whole planet. When ice turns to water, it changes from a reflector to an absorber of solar radiation. When water turns to water vapor, it becomes a powerful greenhouse gas. When water vapor forms clouds, it becomes a reflector once again.

In 2007-2009, countries around the world celebrated the International Polar Year with expanded funding for research on Earth’s changing poles. On Memorial Day weekend, the Burke Baker Planetarium opens a new Ice Worlds show featuring what has been learned about the Arctic and Antarctic in the past two years.

Understanding the role of ice on our world is the first step in understanding how water amplifies any climate change. Ice Worlds is a beautiful show, including ice imagery from Earth’s poles and from the different ice-covered worlds in our solar system.

Science Doesn’t Sleep (9.8.08)

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Bacteria loves milk.
Creative Commons License photo credit: IRRI Images

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

A NASA administrator insists he backs the upcoming retirement of the space shuttle (leaving the U.S. unable to send astronauts to the International Space Station)  - despite a leaked e-mail to the contrary. Oh – and, the BBC reports that Chinese astronauts (called yuhangyuan) will perform their first-ever spacewalk.

Got bacteria? New research indicates that you shouldn’t be washing your antibiotics down with milk.

Bad news for mathletes: using your brain might be making you fat.

NPR asks: Can physicists be funny? (The answer is YES.) Scientists at CERN are going through improv comedy training to help reassure the public that they’re not about to create a giant black hole that will swallow the Earth.

Arctic permafrost holds twice as much carbon as the atmosphere – making it a potential environmental threat. Good thing it’s not melting at a disturbingly fast pace.

Does the President need to be tech-savvy?

Science Doesn’t Sleep (8.20.08)

Highway One
Creative Commons License photo credit: billaday

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

With dead zones expanding and a growing continent of plastic – is it too late to save the ocean?

It’s coming! Here’s an update on CERN’s progress as we countdown to the big day (they throw the switch Sept. 10.)

Shipwrecks: not just bad for the boat. New evidence suggests that coral reefs are victims, too.

Shocker: the current mass extinction may not be the only one humans are responsible for.

Japan has mandated that products are printed with information about their carbon footprint. Will people pay attention?

A Chicago man recently passed a tapeworm. A tapeworm that’s taller than he is.

All hail the underdog: the Olympics are full of elite athletes who science says shouldn’t be the best.