100 Years – 100 Objects: Adamite

The Houston Museum of Natural Science was founded in 1909 - meaning that the curators of the Houston Museum of Natural Science have been collecting and preserving natural and cultural treasures for a hundred years now. For this yearlong series, our current curators have chosen one hundred exceptional objects from the Museum’s immense storehouse of specimens and artifacts—one for each year of our history. Check back here frequently to learn more about this diverse selection of behind-the-scenes curiosities—we will post the image and description of a new object every few days.

This description is from Joel, the Museum’s President and Curator of Gems and Minerals. He’s chosen spectacular objects from the Museum’s mineralogy collection, which includes some of the most rare and fascinating mineral specimens in the world, that we’ll be sharing here – and at 100.hmns.org- throughout the year.

San Judas Chimney, Level 6, Ojuela Mine, Mapimi, Durango, Mexico

adamiteAdamite comes in many colors, but the finest specimens have always come from the Ojuela mine, and by far the most sought-after color is the royal purple found in the San Judas chimney in 1981. The mineral world was galvanized by the extraordinary specimens recovered from that find. Perhaps the best of the lot is this 5.5-cm cluster on limonite matrix—making it the best known example of the species. The complexity, sharpness, perfection, color, arrangement, and luster of the semi-transparent crystals are all superb.

Marvel at the world’s most spectacular collection of natural mineral crystals in the Cullen Hall of Gems and Minerals at the Houston Museum of Natural Science.

You can see more images of this fascinating artifact – as well as the others we’ve posted so far this year – in the 100 Objects section at 100.hmns.org

 

Dead Reckoning

UPDATE: The cache is still hidden – More clues can be found on our new blog post.

For the month of July, I have hidden another geocache near the Museum. To nurture the “inner pirate” of our readers,  it is a treasure – a vial of cut and polished colored gem stones. Additionally if you produce the vial at Museum Services (ask them to contact blogadmin@hmns.org) you will receive Museum passes and admission to The Nature of Diamonds exhibit. 

david-geo-cache-1
The first step is to find the GPS coordinates listed below. Once you have found this spot,  a compass is needed to steer a course of 084 degrees magnetic.  The number of paces is equal to the automobile license plate prefix for my hometown of Tuscaloosa,  Alabama. (That’s  a bit of trivia that will require an Internet search.)

 Good Luck.

david-gps2
N 29 degress 43′ 16.7″
W 95 degrees 23′ 20.5″

The usual rules regarding geocaching apply: no digging, dismantling or destruction is necessary, nor is there any trespassing or climbing involved.

100 Years – 100 Objects: Mesolite with Fluorapophyllite

The Houston Museum of Natural Science was founded in 1909 - meaning that the curators of the Houston Museum of Natural Science have been collecting and preserving natural and cultural treasures for a hundred years now. For this yearlong series, our current curators have chosen one hundred exceptional objects from the Museum’s immense storehouse of specimens and artifacts—one for each year of our history. Check back here frequently to learn more about this diverse selection of behind-the-scenes curiosities—we will post the image and description of a new object every few days.

This description is from Joel, the Museum’s President and curator of Gems and minerals. He’s chosen spectacular objects from the Museum’s mineralogy collection, which includes some of the most rare and fascinating mineral specimens in the world, that we’ll be sharing here – and on hmns.org – throughout the year.

Pashan Hills Near Khadakvasla, Poona, Maharashtra, India.

Mesolite in large crystals and large, spherical sprays like the one pictured here come from only one place in the world: the Pashan Hills quarries.

The 23-cm example shown here, on fluorapophyllite matrix, is probably the world’s finest example of the species.

This specimen is extremely fragile and was brought out of India by mineral dealer Rock Currier, who packed the specimen in powdered soap and bought for it a first-class airplane ticket from Bombay to Los Angeles in order to ensure its safe arrival.

Marvel at the world’s most spectacular collection of natural mineral crystals in the Cullen Hall of Gems and Minerals at the Houston Museum of Natural Science.