Flickr Photo of the Month: Fiddle! [June 2011]

Texas! The Exhibition by photine on Flickr

There are some amazing photographers that wander the halls of HMNS – as well as the areas surrounding the Museum in Hermann Park. When we’re lucky, they share what they capture in our HMNS Flickr pool. Each month, we highlight one of these photos here on the blog.

This month, we’re featuring a photo from Laurie Ballesteros, known as photine on Flickr, who is a regular attendee of the Museum’s Flickr meetups. This photo is from the meetup we held in our current Texas! The Exhibition which features hundreds of fascinating artifacts from Texas’ long and rich history – from the first people who set foot in the state through the Spindletop era.

I loved this photo because it features an artifact that highlights an aspect of a very famous Texan’s character that we tend to forget. But I’ll let Laurie tell it:

My favorite part of Texas history is the Texas Revolution. The characters, stories and battles are bigger than life and I have traveled to several of the battle sites around the states to walk in their footsteps.

I was especially interested in this part of the Texas! exhibit and took my time looking at all the artifacts. As a musician I could not pass up Davy Crockett’s fiddle. It is obviously well used and I love to imagine the tunes floating up from this instrument in the hands of a Texas legend.

You can see more of Laurie’s lovely photos of the Texas exhibition on her blog. Many thanks to Laurie for allowing us to share her image here!

Inspired? Most of the Museum’s permanent galleries are open for photography, and we’d love for you to share your shots with us on Flickr, Facebook or Twitter. Check out the HMNS photo policy for guidelines.

Texas! The Exhibition is a temporary exhibit, and photography is restricted outside of special Flickr meetup opportunities. Follow our posts in the HMNS Flickr pool for announcements about upcoming events.

Flickr Photo of the Month: Summertime! [May 2011]

Flowers - HMNS Demonstration Butterfly Garden
Flowers – HMNS Demonstration Butterfly Garden
by Michael A Sanderson.
View Large.
Posted here with permission.

There are some amazing photographers that wander the halls of HMNS – as well as the areas surrounding the Museum in Hermann Park. When we’re lucky, they share what they capture in our HMNS Flickr pool. Each month, we share one of these photos here on the blog.

Even those who visit the Cockrell Butterfly Center frequently may be unaware that our staff and volunteers maintain a living butterfly garden just outside the Center’s doors. While the indoor rainforest is home to unusual species from exotic locales from Malaysia to Costa Rica, the outdoors butterfly garden is a great spot to check out local Houston species – and learn a little bit about attracting them to your own garden.

I loved this photo of flowers in the Museum’s demonstration butterfly garden by Michael Sanderson, who generously shared it in our Flickr pool and also agreed to let us share it with you. Here are his thoughts on the image:

I love the demonstration butterfly garden at HMNS. It’s kind of out of the way of the main people traffic and at the time of year this photo was taken, many of the other flowers in the area were suffering from the heat and drought. This little area was an oasis in the shade.

Inspired? Most of the Museum’s permanent galleries are open for photography, and we’d love for you to share your shots with us on Flickr, Facebook or Twitter. Check out the HMNS photo policy for guidelines.

Flickr Photo of the Month: Texas Skies! [April 2011]

George Observatory at Brazos Bend State Park
George Observatory at Brazos Bend State Park by Andrew Fritz.
View Large.
Posted here with permission.

There are some amazing photographers that wander the halls of HMNS – and our satellites southwest of Houston. When we’re lucky, they share what they capture in our HMNS Flickr pool. Each month, we share one of these photos here on the blog.

As the weather gets warmer, you may be starting to think about how to get outdoors to enjoy this brief period before our infamous Houston summer gets well and truly unbearable. Our George Observatory is a little-known but not-to-be-missed experience – nestled in Brazos Bend State Park, far enough from the city lights that you can still see the wonders of the cosmos with your own two eyes. And beyond that – you can get a closer view of planets like Saturn (remarkably radiant right now) through the Observatory’s Gueymard Telescope – one of the largest in the country that is available for public viewing.

I loved this photo of the George Observatory by Andrew Fritz, who generously shared it in our Flickr pool and also agreed to let us share it with you. Here are his thoughts on the image:

I live in Richmond (far SW Houston Area) and so Brazos Bend State Park (including the George Observatory) is in my back yard and is my local photographic stomping ground. It is one of the hidden gems of the Houston area and I frequently visit it around sunset when the bird life and light are amazing.

On the night I captured this image I had recently received some new camera gear and this was my first chance to try star photography with it. I hung around in the COLD waiting for the sun to finish setting. Once it had, I spent several hours (yes, hours) taking a few shots around the observatory. An observatory in front of stars is a classic shot. When you are new at something, try what you know works first.

Technical Details:
*Camera: Nikon D700
*Lens: Nikon 28-70mm f2.8 @ 28mm and f2.8
*ISO Speed: 1600
*Shutter: 10s
*The shot was captured on a tripod.
*The dome of the observatory was lit with a small LED light.
*The glow in the sky is Houston.
*The image was shot in RAW and processed using UFRaw.

Visit our George Observatory any Saturday night! When the weather is clear, there’s no better view of the universe.

You can see more of Andrew’s photography on his blog.

Inspired? Most of the Museum’s permanent galleries are open for photography, and we’d love for you to share your shots with us on Flickr, Facebook or Twitter. Check out the HMNS photo policy for guidelines.

Feb. Flickr Photo of the Month: Lensbaby!

This month’s featured photographer is Etee.

When most people think of a Natural Science Museum, the first image that pops into their head is the Paleontology Hall. Giant dinosaurs towering over your head, reminding us of a time long past. How many of us have photos of ourselves standing next to the terrible Tyrannosaurus-Rex, one of the most vicious predators to every walk the face of the Earth? In his photo , Etee gives us a unique perspective of this tremendous beast.

Heres what Etee had to say about his photo:

The day I took this photo, I was visiting the Museum to get some shots of the “Dinosaur Mummy: CSI” exhibit with my new Lensbaby.  Afterwards, I walked through the permanent exhibits taking more photos, finally coming to the T-Rex skeleton.  One of the things I like about this lens is that it produces an image similar to what is shown on TV as being “through the eyes of the beast”, and I wondered how this perspective would change the image from that of “static museum exhibit” to a more imaginative “how would this critter have looked back in the day…”  While it did not take the T-rex out of the museum, it did really focus attention on that mouth and all those sharp teeth – something I am certain its prey also saw.

So, what’s this Photo of the Month feature all about? Our science museum is lucky enough to have talented and enthusiastic people who visit us every day – wandering our halls, grounds and satellite facilities, capturing images of the wonders on display here that rival the beauty of the subjects themselves. Thankfully, many share their photos with us and everyone else in our HMNS Flickr group – and we’re posting our favorites here, on the Museum’s blog, once a month. (You can check out all our previous picks here or here.)

 

20090111_8467 by Etee

Many thanks to Etee for allowing us to share his stunning beautiful photograph. We hope this and all the other amazing photography in our group on Flickr will inspire you to bring a camera along next time you’re here – and show us what you see.