“Come and Take It!” [Texas Exhibit]

If you are planning to see Texas! The Exhibition at the Houston Museum of Natural Science you are in for a real treat. One of my favorite pieces of Texas memorabilia is stationed right in the middle of this all inclusive Texas! exhibit.

Come And Take It Cannon
The Come And Take It Cannon,
on display in Texas! The Exhibition.
See a full set of images from the exhibit on Flickr.

It’s the “Come and Take It!” cannon from the Battle of Gonzales.

The Battle of Gonzales has been called the “Lexington” of the Texas Revolution. The battle took place on October 2, 1835. Tension had been high between the Mexican government under the leadership of Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna and the U.S. citizens living in Mexican Texas. It was because of this tension that the Mexican forces showed up near Gonzales with a request.

You see, the Mexican government had loaned a small cannon to the people of Gonzales to help ward off Indian attacks in 1831. Now that relations with the Texian colonists and the Mexican government were souring quickly, Mexico felt they should retrieve all of their “loaned” artillery. This task fell into the hands of Col. Domingo de Ugartechea.

Ugartechea dispatched Francisco de Castañeda to Gonzales to retrieve the cannon. According to The Handbook of Texas Online, when Castañeda and his troops arrived they asked the colonists to return the cannon. The colonists pointed the cannon towards the Mexican forces and said “there it is – come and take it.” The ladies of the settlement quickly made a flag to hoist over the cannon simply saying “Come and Take It!”

The cannon was not taken that day by the Mexican forces, and its place in history was now cemented forever. The cannon has been thought of as a symbol of Texas Freedom.

The slogan has proved that you don’t mess with Texas!

When you view this small cannon, you can’t help but think that this little guy made a large impact in the history of Texas and its people.

One feels a sense of pride, not necessarily for the cannon sitting on display but for the actions of those who dared rebel against the Santa Anna government which was restricting their rights as colonists.

Come And Take It
The Come And Take It Cannon,
on display in Texas! The Exhibition.
See a full set of images from the exhibit on Flickr.

The Gonzales Memorial Museum located on 414 Smith Street in the city of Gonzales has been home to this remarkable object since the Museum was built (1936 – 1937). When the Houston Museum of Natural Science decided to put this exhibit together the “Come and Take It!” cannon was a natural fit. The city of Gonzales said, “come and take it,” so we went and took it. Now everyone should come and see it!