Science Doesn’t Sleep (9.8.08)

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Bacteria loves milk.
Creative Commons License photo credit: IRRI Images

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

A NASA administrator insists he backs the upcoming retirement of the space shuttle (leaving the U.S. unable to send astronauts to the International Space Station)  - despite a leaked e-mail to the contrary. Oh – and, the BBC reports that Chinese astronauts (called yuhangyuan) will perform their first-ever spacewalk.

Got bacteria? New research indicates that you shouldn’t be washing your antibiotics down with milk.

Bad news for mathletes: using your brain might be making you fat.

NPR asks: Can physicists be funny? (The answer is YES.) Scientists at CERN are going through improv comedy training to help reassure the public that they’re not about to create a giant black hole that will swallow the Earth.

Arctic permafrost holds twice as much carbon as the atmosphere – making it a potential environmental threat. Good thing it’s not melting at a disturbingly fast pace.

Does the President need to be tech-savvy?

Science Doesn’t Sleep

Star trails
Creative Commons License photo credit: chadmill

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

Richard Garriott is going to space this October – for $30 million, you can, too. (Garriott was recently at HMNS to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the development of the world’s first Challenger Learning Center here – and announce that he’ll be blogging his mission at www.challenger.com)

The Perseid Meteor shower is coming up this Aug. 11/12 – check out these tips on how to view it right.

Scientists are looking to the “dinosaur eel” – an ancient species which has multiple layers of scales that protect it - for inspiration to develop lighter body armor for soldiers.

In creating an oxygen-filled atmosphere in which life on Earth could thrive, it turns out that bacteria had help.

If you missed the original – now’s your chance: the Woodstock Museum has opened on the site of the original 1969 concert.

How much energy do your microwave, computer, and toaster use when you’re not home? We’re not really sure. Enter: smart metering.

Science Doesn’t Sleep (5.1.08)

Bacteria

Be very afraid, bacteria. Be very afraid.
Creative Commons License photo credit: kaibara87

So here’s what went down since you logged off.

Despite the fact that we got a special preview of the amazing rock-hewn church iFest built for this year’s event, and a behind-the-scenes look into the arts director’s creative process, a series of mishaps kept us from getting a final look at the finished church. Luckily, Photine is there for us, with this amazing photo of the finished product.

You kill a werewolf with a silver stake – everyone knows that. Science Buzz informs us that at the nano-scale, silver becomes much more deadly – killing off all bacteria, good and bad.

Intense heat is not the only reason you wouldn’t want to be hanging out on the Sun – check out this video of “sunquakes.” (via Geology.com)

Irony alert! The human cousin deemed Nutcracker Man actually preferred soft fruits.

Ever wondered if a boomerang works in space? Now we know.