Book List: Mythical Creatures

The sense of wonder is alive in children, and that may be the reason children love books about mythical creatures– unicorns, dragons, monsters, etc.  The pages of books are the perfect, safe places for these creatures to come to life.

When I began considering books to write about one title jumped out at me:  The Luck of the Loch Ness Monster a Tale of Picky Eating by A. W. Flaherty.  The reason is simple.  My granddaughter Abbie believes cereal, chicken nuggets, Pop Tarts, Cheetos, peanut butter crackers and a few other items make a wonderful diet.  I hoped this book would help me discover a way to get Abbie out of her rut, but it did not.  However, not for the reason you might expect.

Katerina-Elizabeth is a young girl who takes an ocean liner to visit her grandmother in Scotland.  Traveling alone, Katerina-Elizabeth discovers that her parents have ordered oatmeal for her every day.  Hating oatmeal, Katerina-Elizabeth tosses it out the porthole.  A sea worm “no bigger around than a thread and no longer than your thumbnail” thinks the oatmeal is a lovely treat.  You guessed it….Katerina-Elizabeth continues to throw her oatmeal overboard each morning, and the sea worm, growing constantly, follows the boat to get his breakfast. 

When the boat reaches Scotland it continues up the River Ness to Loch Ness and the worm follows.  Luckily for the worm, the children of Scotland do not like oatmeal either, and they also throw their breakfast in the water.

Several months later, a child spots the worm and calls it a monster.  Looking at his reflection in the water, the worm sees how much he had changed.  Tourists begin flocking to Loch Ness to see “Nessie,” and when Katerina-Elizabeth is sailing home to America, the most famous “Nessie” sighting of all occurs. 

The author, a neurologist at Massachusetts General Hospital and a teacher at Harvard Medical School is a picky eater, as is one of her twin daughters.  The other twin is, like Dr. Flaherty’s husband, a normal eater.  In a section called “The Science of It All,” Dr. Flaherty explains the difference between Supertasters, Nontasters and average tasters.  She says that picky eating is often genetic, and most picky eaters are Supertasters.  She even provides a simple test to see which kind of taster your child or you are. 

Although I loved this book, I did not learn ways to help Abbie become an adventurous eater. More importantly, I realized Abbie must be a Supertaster, so she is not likely to change.  I’ll just relax and enjoy her.

One of the most beautiful books about mythical creatures is Pegasus by Marianna Mayer and illustrated by K. Y. Craft. 

Rainy Day
Creative Commons License photo credit: caroline.apollo

Pegasusis the story of the young hero Bellerophon and his quest. The king of Lycia has been instructed by King Proetusto kill Bellerophon, but the king of Lycia is fond of Bellerophon.  Rather than kill the young man outright, the king of Lycia devises a task which would inevitably lead to Bellerophon’s death.  Bellerophon is to slay the Chimera, a fire-breathing monster with the head of a lion, the body of a goat and the tail of a serpent.

Before beginning his journey Bellerophon consults a well-known soothsayer and is told that in order to be successful he would need the help of the winged, wild horse Pegasus.  As he is looking for Pegasus, Bellerophon falls asleep by the fountain Pirene.  In his sleep, a beautiful goddess appears to him and tells him of the importance of creating a bond of trust between the young hero and the winged horse.  Only with this bond will the slaying of the Chimera be possible.  Following the battle between the hero and the monster, Bellerophon marries the king of Lycia’s daughter.  However, the hero and the winged horse had forged a bond that neither would forget.

The illustrations in this book are exquisite.  Seeing the picture of Pegasus spreading his wings, you can almost feel the feathers and experience the horse rising into the sky.  The illustrations enhance the text to the extent that it is difficult to imagine one without the other.  The last page features the only round picture in the book, and it creates the feeling of gazing through a telescope at the constellation Pegasus in the night sky.  The illustration is both beautiful and thought-provoking.

Surely, unicorns are every young girl’s favorite mythical, magical creatures, and unicorns that fly are even better! Unicorn Races by Stephen J. Brooks features Abigail and her nightly journey to a forest to watch six unicorns race. 

Unicorn Dreams
Creative Commons License photo credit: seeks2dream

After being tucked in for the night Abigail gets up and puts on her princess dress, her princess shoes and waves her princess wand.  In a few minutes, the unicorn Lord William appears at Abigail’s window, and after she puts on her princess crown he flies her to the magical place where colored unicorns race and fairies and elves provide a feast sure to please any child—sundaes, cakes and cookies.  Following the feast, Lord William flies Abigail back to her room where she falls asleep dreaming of the next unicorn race.

The author Stephen Brooks is a former Federal Agent and “writes to comfort children.”  His books “provide enchanting worlds where children are safe to wander and explore.”  Linda Crockett’s illustrations bring this fantasy to life with beautiful colors and magic on each page.  Don’t just read the book—look closely at the illustrations for a special treat.

Let the wild rumpus start!
Creative Commons License photo credit: rgarwood

Perhaps the best-known book about mythical characters is Maurice Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are.  Max has been naughty and his mother sends him to his room with no dinner.  Alone in his room, a magical forest, the Land of the Wild Things, grows in his imagination.  Although Max becomes “King of All Wild Things” he is homesick and returns to his room where he finds his dinner waiting for him—still warm.

So whether you choose a book in the hopes of solving a dilemma like I did or just want your imagination to soar, these books are a great place to begin.  Enjoy!

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