Science Doesn’t Sleep (8.26.08)


August 26, 2008
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Erin B
Authored By Erin B Blatzer

Erin is the Director of Business Development at HMNS. In a past life, she was a public relations and online marketing dynamo at HMNS.

No 296!.....I am NOT a Number..lol..:O)
Creative Commons License photo credit: law_keven

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

According to new analysis of satellite imagery, cows tend to face “moo North” – indicating that they somehow sense Earth’s magnetism.

The goblin shark is so strange-looking – and you can check it out in this video from Japan.

Victory for the caveman! According to new research, Neanderthal technology was no less advanced than early human technology. (So, they didn’t go extinct because they were dumb) Also smarter than you think: goldfish.

Now you can decide for yourself whether CERN is about to destroy the Earth: they’ve published all the techincal details online, at the Journal of Instrumentation, and it’s free to read without a subscription.

What happens when our technology becomes smarter than we are?

3 responses to “Science Doesn’t Sleep (8.26.08)”

  1. Sarah says:

    “Goblin sharks aren’t only found in Japan – they’ve been seem in New Zealand, the North Pacific, the Gulf of Mexico…”

    Thanks Erin. Thanks. I’m never ever going in the ocean ever again.

  2. Jamie Glover says:

    The goblin shark is amazing. I’ve watched shark week on the Discovery Channel every year without fail for as long as I can remember and I’ve never seen anything like it! What incredible footage!! The movement and shape of the mouth are so unique – practically unhinging from the jaw, and the teeth curved backwards toward the back of the throat like a venemous snake.

    It almost looks like the shark can’t see the diver until he is right upon him. Does anyone know what this sharks’ eyesite is like or does the light affect it?

  3. Chris Flis says:

    Goblin sharks are kind of cool. They can be found in deep waters where sunlight cannot penetrate; thus in order to feed he uses his rostrum; the long snout. The sensitivity can detect potential prey.

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