Spicy Cocktails: Anvil’s Ginger Beer [Big Bite Nite]

What makes a good scientist? Attention to detail.

habanero!
Click here for more behind-
the-scenes photos from our
video shoot at Anvil.

What makes a good cocktail? Attention to detail.

The fine folks at Anvil have attention to detail down. We went behind the scenes with Kevin, one of the co-owners, to capture those details, in the art and the chemistry that goes into making Anvil’s signature Ginger Beer, which they’ll be sharing with visitors at Big Bite Nite on April 29! (Tickets are going fast – get yours here.)

Despite its more familiar, sweet incarnations in ginger bread or gingerbread men – ginger itself is actually quite spicy. And the process of getting juice from a ginger root was both strange (when was the last time you juiced a root?) and fascinating.

Kevin kicked it up a notch by adding habanero peppers (which, you might remember from an earlier video, can just about burn your lips off if you’re not careful) just before final splash (or fizz) of CO2.

Even just a quarter of one habanero pepper was enough to make this quite a spicy spirit. It was a tad too much for me – but that’s just me. You can test your tastebuds on April 29, when Anvil samples it’s Ginger Beer-based cocktail at Big Bite Nite!

Check out the other videos in our Big Bite Nite series!
Spicy Science: The Evolution of Plants

Our resident botanist explores just what makes some plants so spicy!
Fire & Ice: Rev. Butter Turns Up the Heat

Preview Rev. Butter’s hot ice sculpting style – and check it out live before the doors open at Big Bite Nite on April 29!

Chemistry in the Kitchen: The Science Behind Ice Cream

Legend has it that the Roman emperor Nero discovered ice cream. Runners brought snow from the mountains to make the first ice cream.

Making ice cream at home is easy – no mountain marathon required! Just read the instructions below and enjoy your very own homemade ice cream.

ice-cream-bowl
 Creative Commons LicensePhoto Credit: Jessicafm

Materials:
Sugar
Milk
Vanilla
Rock salt
Pint-size baggies – heavy duty
Gallon-size baggies – heavy duty
Measuring cup
Measuring spoons
Spoons

Procedure:
1. Fill the large bag about ½ full of ice.  Add 6 tablespoons of rock salt to the ice.

2. Put ½ cup of milk, ¼ teaspoon of vanilla, and 1 tablespoon of sugar into a smaller baggie and seal.  Put this inside another small baggie and seal.  This will prevent saltwater from seeping into your ice cream.

3. Place the double bagged small baggie into the larger baggie and seal.

4. Shake the baggie until you have ice cream. 

5. Remove the smaller baggie from the larger one.  Wipe off the water, then open it carefully and enjoy your ice cream! 

UPDATE: Check out our Science of Ice Cream video to learn more!

Sharky-Locks and the Three Gummi Bears

Need another excuse to buy candy this October?  Like cheap entertainment? Of course you do! How about some do-it-yourself grow-animals? For a buck or two, you can have a hundred edible expanding critters of your very own.

You need a few gummi bears or other gummi snacks (I grant you they are of questionable nutritional value, but they have their uses) and water. That’s pretty much it — see what we mean about cheap? 

I started with three gummi bears and one much larger gummi shark which had a disturbing layer of opaque white gummi on the bottom. 

If you want to know how much your gummi critters grow, you might want to trace around them or measure them, or just set some of your gummy snacks aside for comparison later. I had an electronic balance handy, so I used it, but that’s definitely not necessary:


The growing:  You need a container that can hold your gummi animals with a little room for expansion, and enough water to keep them covered:

And now we wait.  You may notice some expansion an hour after you begin, but your animals will look significantly bigger after 12-24 hours in water.  A few things to note: If you plan to eat your critters once they expand, please refrigerate them during the soaking process (this may slow their expansion somewhat, but you will also slow the growth of not-so-delicious bacteria). Whether you are refrigerating or not, set your critters somewhere and leave them alone as much as possible; if they jostle around too much, they may just dissolve and leave you with an unimpressive pool of colored sugar-water.

After a 20-hour soak, one of the bears intimidates his dry brother:


The “after” measurements:

This bear grew about three times as large as it was originally, and the shark about twice as large (it might have expanded further if given more time but it fell apart after being handled.)

Here’s a brief explanationof growing gummi snacks.

Extensions to try:  Soak your critters in distilled water, salt water, soda or juice, or try soaking an expanded critter in salt water.  Do some brands of bears hold up better or expand more?

(In case you were curious: Yes, you can spell it either way: gummi or gummy.)