Kids Explore STEAM Careers with HMNS Outreach

Inspiring a child takes effort, time, passion and heart. It’s why we do what we do.

At the Houston Museum of Natural Science, discoveries are made daily. The sounds of learning fill our hallways every day, from the gasp of wonder from a kid stepping onto the Morian Overlook for the first time or the squeal of delight as a butterfly in the Cockrell Butterfly Center rests on a child’s shoulder. Those sounds are all the evidence we need to know we are upholding HMNS’ mission, its commitment to education.

For the kids that may not be able to get to the museum, there is HMNS Outreach. Our variety of programs brings HMNS straight to the community, visiting hundreds of schools and organizations each year and reaching more than 100,000 children in 2015 alone. The ultimate goal is to instill in these kids a love of learning that will carry them to new heights in their careers and throughout their lives.

Here are some of the many STEAM careers that HMNS Outreach can inspire a child to reach for.


The TOTAL Wildlife On Wheels offers an extraordinary look at animals of all kinds. Students get an up close and personal encounter with wildlife ranging from snakes and frogs to birds and mammals.

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Students in Turner High School’s Vet Tech program observe the wing of a Ringneck Dove, which travels as part of the TOTAL Wildlife On Wheels Vertebrates program.

Forensic Scientist

A presentation of Cleanup Crew from the Bugs On Wheels program will cover the process of decomposition and the return of vital elements to the Earth. These principles of decomposition are crucial to forensic scientists, who use arthropods and fungi to study crime scenes and gather more information.


Entomologist Erin Mills shows off a Giant African Millipede during a presentation of the Bugs On Wheels program Cleanup Crew.


Body Works is our newest set of programs in the Science Start family, and these presentations focus on the anatomy and capabilities of the human body. From the brain to the heart to the skeleton, each of these presentations will provide students with a comprehensive overview of what we can do with what we’ve got.



A Chevron Earth Science On Wheels program like Know Your Rocks is immensely useful for future careers in Geology. A students’ knowledge of the rock cycle and the differences between different types of rocks and fuels can be vital in fields such as the energy industry.


A student discusses the properties of two different specimens with his classmates during a presentation of Know Your Rocks.


A visit from the HMNS Discovery Dome includes more than 40 different shows about a range of topics, including a classic planetarium show, The Starry Night. One of today’s kids could discover a new planet, a galaxy, or even a black hole, and the Dome provides a great foundation for an interest in astronomy.

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Students at Reagan High School file into the Discovery Dome for a screening of Cosmic Collisions, a show narrated by Robert Redford about different outer space encounters between celestial objects.


An interest in foreign cultures can take you all over the world or even back in time. Anthropologists study the history of humanity, and Docents To Go programs such as Native Americans or Ancient Egypt provide students with an introduction to different communities and societies.


Volunteer Bob Joyce shows an arrowhead and arrow used for hunting by Native Americans.


Try a ConocoPhillips Science On Stage program like Cool Chemistry, which discusses different chemical reactions as well as the properties of polymers and liquid nitrogen. It’s a great glimpse into what chemistry is all about!


Educator Carolyn Leap discusses the properties of a polymer during a presentation of Cool Chemistry.


Students at Johnston Middle School have had the opportunity to sketch animals from the museum’s TOTAL Wildlife On Wheels and Bugs On Wheels programs over the years, and they’ve produced some spectacular pieces, like the crocodile skull below.


These are just a few of the many STEAM careers that are natural extensions of the concepts discussed in HMNS Outreach. We are proud to play an important role in the lives of students all over the Houston area and beyond, and we are honored to have the opportunity to inspire the next generation.


A student draws Peanut, a Costa Rican Curly Hair Tarantula, as Peanut cooperatively sits still.

To book HMNS Outreach, email, call us at the number listed on our site, or fill out this form online. We look forward to working with you!

Strong STEM Branches from GEMS: Girls Exploring Math and Science

The Houston Museum of Natural Science, along with the Girls Scouts of San Jacinto Council, cordially invite you to attend the Girls Exploring Math and Science event, Feb. 20 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. GEMS is a free event for members and is included with the purchase of a ticket to the museum’s permanent exhibit halls for non-members. It is open to girls and boys of all ages.GEMS4

Currently, women earn more college and graduate degrees than men, but a gender gap still persists in the fields of science and in higher-level math intensive fields such as engineering. The U.S. Census Bureau statistics place the percentage of women working in fields related to STEM at 7 percent in 1970 and at 23 percent in 1990. There has been little growth since, with an estimate of 26 percent, according to 2011 statistics.

There is plenty of evidence that demonstrates that many girls in elementary school show interest in STEM subjects and may even hold desires for future STEM-related careers. However, there is equal evidence that by fifth grade, interest appears to wane and continues to do so through high school in the general female population. While girls are not alone in this trend as it can be seen in other student demographics, it is troubling.


Keeping girls interested in science and math long-term is a broad-spectrum problem with no easy solution. However, there are a number of curative steps that can be implemented to recoup interest in STEM subjects. Increasing the visibility of female role models in math and science is one important step. This helps girls envision themselves in such fields. HMNS and the GEMS program capitalizes on this idea by incorporating young and enthusiastic female role models with whom girls can interact.

In addition, during GEMS, the museum is packed with hands-on science and math opportunities, community booths, and other science professionals. Children and adults can take their time to fully explore the opportunities and careers available in the fields of science and math.


Girls need opportunities and encouragement in a wide range of STEM-related activities not only at school, but also through extracurricular activities such as GEMS. Helping girls to see these fields as exciting, relevant, and viable will take hard work on the part of teachers, parents, community members, and volunteers. I encourage you to take a small step in providing this encouragement to a girl in your life by bringing her to experience GEMS.

Watching the River Flow

Water is important. 

That’s a pretty self explanatory statement.  Not only do we need water (at least 8 cups a day), but we are mostly water (60% of us anyway).  It’s one of the indictors we look for in new planets to see if we can use it as future real estate. It’s cornucopia of resources can provide almost everything people need to survive. Animals and plants that grow and live in water can provide food and clothing.  Caves hollowed out by water can provide shelter. The prehistoric oceans provide an area to lay the foundation of hydrocarbons. Water can be drunk to satiate thirst.  The movement of water can power the machines of mankind.

Creative Commons License photo credit: kevin dooley

Man has always known he needs water. Water has always been present whether it comes freely from the skies or washes down in all its fury in a flood.  Agriculture brought about man’s first attempt to channel what water he had.  The landscape was literally remade to get the water to move where it was needed.  Deserts have been made to flower and flowering areas have been made into deserts.  As time went by, we were able to make the movement of water do more for us.  First it was used to help run simple machines, such as mills, where grain was ground into flour.  It was also used in mining, to bring the ore out of the mine, or used to power hammers at a forge.

Water power helped to start the next stage of technological development, the Industrial Revolution. Larger and larger factories were built on rivers to take advantage of the free energy that the flowing water offered them.  Unfortunately they also let the water carry off their excess and trash, making downstream a place to avoid.  While the Thames helped England become a technologic and mercantile titan, it also made the river undrinkable and became so foul that the House of Commons had to be abandoned for a while in the mid 19th century. Water was also the crucial part of steam power that allowed the transportation industry to remake itself from horse drawn carriages to trains and steamboats.

Blast off
Creative Commons License photo credit: fairlightworks

Water is still vital today.

 Most of electricity comes from burning fuels to create steam to move turbines.  Water is also crucially important for solar panels.  Water may sound like an odd thing for solar power to depend upon, but large scale solar thermal arrays can use twice as much water per mega watt hour as a coal fired plant.  Geothermal power plants use water the exact same way as coal fired plants; they heat it into steam and have it turn turbines (although the water could be replaced with other substances). Biomass needs water to grow. 

And of course water is the essential part of hydropower.  Without water (hydro) hydropower would be impossible.  When most people think of hydropower they think of dams (this is where being fond of puns can get you into a lot of trouble, kids. Just leave those dam puns alone).  A dam works by controlling the flow of the water.  It constricts the area the water is trying to move through and uses that movement to turn the turbines.  Because the pathway is constricted, the water backs up and can form a lake (also called a reservoir).  This changes the local environment from a river to a lake. This can affect the local wildlife and lead to erosion downstream.  People (and history) can be affected by dam building as well.  Due to the building of the Aswan Dam in Egypt, over 150,000 people had to be relocated because they were in the flood plain created by the dam.  The Abu Simbel Temple was moved to higher ground as well.

Hydropower can also be generated by the flow of a river, the movement of the waves, and the tides (movement is electricity) and electricity is movement. It is also easy to transfer excess electrical generation into storage by pumping some of the water back upstream or back into the reservoir. 

Electricity generated by hydropower accounted for nearly 7 % of our total U.S. electrical generation in 2010. Over half of the hydroelectricity comes from the 3 states on the West Cost; California, Oregon, and Washington.  While there has been a lot of development over the years, there is still the potential to add more hydroelectric sites and increase the electrical output by a 3rd.  However, the amount of electricity produced by hydroelectric generation varies from year to year with the water cycle.  If you have a year with less precipitation, the rivers may have less water; if the river slows, the amount of electricity is less. Most areas where a large scale hydroelectric plant would work have already been dammed up for use.  The future might be in small scale generators that would help communities near running water.

Creative Commons License photo credit: Perrimoon

All that to say water is, in fact, important. 

We have to have it to live.  We have to have it for our energy production. It takes 10 gallons of water to make 1,000 kilowatt hours using natural gas as a fuel, up to 9,200 gallons for solar thermal and about 20,000 gallons for nuclear. So what happens when we start to run out of it?  I don’t mean that the water on the Earth will suddenly disappear.  It is in a mostly closed system and the water can’t go anywhere (except if water is used on a space ship outside the atmosphere).  What I mean is that on a planet that’s mostly water, only 3% of it is fresh water.  We can’t drink saltwater.  We can’t grow crops with saltwater.  In the coming decades we will have to manage what water we have well. There are ways to generate more fresh water.  Desalinization removes the salt from sea water, but it is energy intensive.  In some areas the excess removal of groundwater can cause subsidence.  This has been an issue in the Houston area. In the 70’s this led to the creation of a Harris Galveston Subsidence District, the only one of its kind in the USA, to monitor and regulate groundwater usage to prevent subsidence. 

Water management will become increasingly important. 

Good water management will make sure that both people and industries get the water they need. Communities all along waterways will have to work together to mange their resource.  Managed from the local level up we’ll be able to sail through any water crisis.