There’s a Partial Solar Eclipse Happening October 23: Here’s what you need to know to see it!

 

There’s a partial solar eclipse happening Thursday, October 23 and you can see it all from Houston*!

 The New Moon of Thursday, October 23, 2014, aligns with the Sun and the Earth well enough to cast its shadow towards Earth. However, no one will see a total eclipse for two reasons. First of all, the Moon was at apogee (greatest distance from Earth) on October 18, and is therefore smaller than usual in our sky. As a result, it is not quite big enough to cover the Sun, and the only eclipse possible would be an annular eclipse. Also, the Moon shadow is aligned to a point in space just over the Earth’s upper limb, so nobody will even get to see an annular eclipse. The near miss, however, allows the penumbra, where the Moon partially blocks the Sun, to land on the Earth. With North America near the upper limb of the Earth at the time, Houston will be within the penumbra. Therefore we will see a partial solar eclipse, in which the Moon will cover almost a quarter of the Sun’s disk at most.

partialeclipse

At 4:59pm CDT, look for the Moon to take a ‘bite’ out of the Sun’s disk. The Moon covers the northern limb of the Sun, which is the right side of the Sun as it sets in the west. Maximum eclipse, with the Moon covering almost 1/4 of the Sun’s disk, is at 5:58.  At 6:43, the Sun sets while still in partial eclipse. After this, the next partial solar eclipse visible from Houston occurs August 21, 2017. 

ECLIPSE TIMES

Eclipse begins: 4:59 PM, CDT
Mid-eclipse: 5:58 PM
Sunset: 6:43 PM

The Museum’s own George Observatory in Brazos Bend State Park will be open to the public from 1:00 -6:00 p.m. on October 23 for observing the Sun and, starting at 5:00, the eclipse.  

*CAUTION: Never look directly at the Sun with the naked eye or through an unfiltered telescope. Permanent eye-damage will result. 

Girls just wanna have sun: Confessions of a compulsive solar eclipse chaser

As a veteran eclipse chaser, I’ve seen eight solar eclipses in trips that have taken me around the world.

Why travel to the ends of the Earth for an event lasting only a few minutes, you ask? Astronomical objects lie far away and change very little from night to night or even from year to year. It’s true it’s always the same moon, same planets, same star clusters, nebulas and galaxies — all looking a bit fuzzy and tiny, even through a telescope. But a total solar eclipse is totally different; suddenly, astronomy becomes incredibly exciting and everything happens fast.

groupeclipse
Dr. Carolyn Sumners (bottom) photographing the HMNS group at the 2009 Total Solar Eclipse in China with fish-eye lens camera.

In a total solar eclipse the moon creeps in front of the sun, and then all at once covers the sun’s photosphere, plunging a tiny part of the Earth into darkness. Those lucky enough to be in this shadow see coronal streamers surrounding the black moon disk — like a glowing crown with red arcs of ionized gas dancing from behind the moon. Suddenly, there’s too much to see and it’s all happening way too fast.

Just as quickly as the darkness comes, daylight returns. As the moon moves past, light from the sun’s photosphere peeks through mountain ranges along the moon’s edge. Called Bailey’s Beads, these tiny flickering lights appear for just an instant before the famous “diamond ring,” when the first bit of the sun’s photosphere is visible once again. Then the protective glasses go on and the sun (with a piece still hidden by the moon) returns the world to daylight.

The Maya worried that the sun would not return after an eclipse, signaling the end of the world — an appropriate thought for an eclipse in the year 2012.

Total solar eclipses are special because they are so rare. The total solar eclipse occurring this Nov. 14 is the only one in 2012, and the only one in an accessible location until 2017. To see a total eclipse, you must usually become a world traveler, and this year is no exception. This eclipse occurs mostly over water at a time when equatorial oceans are largely cloud-covered.

The best viewing is along a strip of the Great Barrier Reef coast around the city of Cairns, Australia on Nov. 14, 2012, an hour after sunrise. And once again, that’s where I’ll be.

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HMNS Trip to View the 2012 Solar Eclipse in Australia: November 10-24, 2012

HMNS has included the 2012 total solar eclipse experience viewed from the coast of Australia near the Great Barrier Reef as part of a two-week tour of the South Pacific that includes Cairns and Sydney, Australia; and Christchurch and Queenstown, New Zealand, with an optional extension to Fiji.

There is an early registration discount of $250 per person for those registered for the trip by May 15! Pricing is $5,699 per person double occupancy with international air and 20 meals, or $3,449 per person double occupancy land-only package, with single and triple room packages available.

Click here for itinerary and registration information.

Travel Night – Australia: Monday, May 14, 6 p.m.

For interested travelers and those already registered, this evening allows you to meet trip leader Dr. Carolyn Sumners, who will provide an eclipse viewing overview, and see a slideshow of the trip itinerary. Our travel agents will be there to answer all questions about the trip.

Go Stargazing! January Edition

Jupiter, now in the west at dusk, dominates this month’s evening skies.  It outshines all stars in the sky, so it’s easy to find.  Face west southwest at dusk and look for the brightest thing there.

Venus remains a dazzling morning star.  Face southeast at dawn and you can’t miss it.

Saturn is in the south southwest at dawn, above the much brighter Venus.

Mars is still lost in the sun’s glare; it will remain invisible to us all winter as Earth passes around the far side of the sun from it.

The Great Square of Pegasus sets in the west, while brilliant winter stars shine in the south.  Orion, the Hunter, is almost due south.  His two dogs, represented by Sirius and Procyon, are to his left.  Above Orion is Taurus, the Bull with Aldebaran as its eye. Gemini, the Twins, are to Orion’s upper left.

Moon Phases in January 2011:

New Moon                              January 4, 3:03 a.m

1st Quarter                             January 12, 5:32 a.m

Full Moon                               January 19, 3:22 a.m.

Last Quarter                          January 26, 6:58 p.m.

The new moon of Tuesday, January 4, partially blocks the sun, causing a partial solar eclipse.  This event occurs during our nighttime, however; the eclipse is visible only in Europe, western Asia, and northern Africa.

Eclipsed? Not totally.
Creative Commons License photo credit: James Jordan

At about 1 p.m. on Monday, January 3, the Earth is as close to the sun as it will get all year. In other words, Earth is at perihelion. Earth’s orbit is not a perfect circle but an ellipse, so its distance from the sun varies between about 147 million kilometers in January and 152 million kilometers in July. This variation is too small to affect our seasons; the effect of Earth’s 23.5 degree title on its axis dominates it. That’s why it’s colder now than in July. The actual moment of perihelion varies each year between late on January 1 and early on January 5.

At Houston’s latitude, the latest sunrise of the year occurs Friday, January 10.  Of course, days have been lengthening since the solstice, which makes sunset later and sunrise earlier.  However, Earth is still going a little faster than average on its orbit, since it is just past perihelion (its closest approach to the sun).  This causes sunrise, local noon, and sunset to occur slightly later each day.  Until mid-January, we are still close enough to perihelion that the second effect actually predominates.  As a result, sunset gets a little later during early January even while the days are getting longer.

Go Stargazing! July Edition

During July, you can watch a great planet race, as Venus closes in on Mars while they both close in on Saturn!

Saturn is now in the south southwest at dusk.  Look just to the west of due south, about 2/3 of the way up from the horizon to the zenith.

Venus remains high in the evening sky during July.  Face west at dusk and look for a point of light that outshines everything in the sky but the Sun and the Moon.

Mars is also in the western sky.  Look in the west at dusk for a reddish point of light between Venus and Saturn.

Observe all three carefully throughout July and watch as they get closer together.  By July 31, Mars will have caught up to Saturn, with Venus only about 7.5 degrees away.  Keep watching next month as Mars moves ahead of Saturn and Venus passes them both.

Jupiter is in the south at dawn this month.  It outshines all stars in the sky, so it’s easy to find.  By July 31, Jupiter rises at about 11 p.m.; it will be a late evening object next month.

In the west, a distinct backwards question mark shape outlines the mane and forepaws of Leo, the Lion.  Three stars forming a right triangle are to its upper left; they mark Leo’s hindquarters.  This month, the Lion serves as the backdrop for the great planet race described above.  The Big Dipper is high in the northwest at dusk. You can extend the curve of its handle to ‘arc to Arcturus’ and then ‘speed on to Spica.’  These stars high in the west and southwest, respectively, by dusk tonight.  Arcturus, by the way, is the fourth brightest star we ever see at night, but the brightest one Americans ever see in all of July.

In the east, look for the enormous Summer Triangle, consisting of the stars Deneb, Vega, and Altair.   This triangle is up all night long in July, hence its name.  Scorpius, the Scorpion, is in the southeast at dusk.  Sagittarius, the Archer, known for its ‘teapot’ asterism, is to its left.  Between these two star patterns is the center of our Milky Way—the brightest part of that band as wee see it.  On a cloudless night far from the big city, see if you notice the Milky Way glow near the ‘teapot’ of Sagittarius.

Summer Triangle

Moon Phases in July 2010:

Last Quarter                       July 4, 9:36 am

New Moon                            July 11, 2:40 pm

1st Quarter                         July 18, 5:11 am

Full Moon                            July 25, 8:36 pm

Flag of Turkey
Creative Commons License photo credit: steelight

The new moon of Sunday, July 11, will align precisely with the sun and Earth, casting its shadow on the Earth.  This will cause a total solar eclipse.

Unfortunately, the shadow’s path is entirely over the South Pacific Ocean.  Easter Island and certain islands of French Polynesia are the only land where totality can be seen.  Even partial phases are visible only from South America.

On Tuesday, July 6, Earth is as far from the sun as it will get this year, a position called aphelion.  Remember, the Earth’s orbit is not quite a circle but an ellipse.  We are therefore slightly closer to the Sun in January than in July.  Also, remember that the difference between our January and July distances from the Sun is small.  When it comes to making us hotter or colder, the effect of our axial tilt dominates.