‘Tis the season: Fall is finally (sorta) here — and so is our Semi-Annual Plant Sale

Fall is coming! Leaves are changing color, temperatures start creeping down, and gardeners will be able to get back outside without the threat of heatstroke.

Well, in theory. This is Houston, after all.

But despite the fact that it’ll be warm until Thanksgiving, there is something we can look forward to: cooler temps! And you know what else likes cooler temps? Plants! Plants can get a little stressed out in the hot, dry summer months, and some will even go into a dormant state (which means they cease to grow to conserve as much energy as they can). This type of dormancy is usually caused by drought stress.

If you’re like me, you don’t like to spend a lot of money irrigating your landscape, so my solution is to choose plants that do not need regular watering. There are many great butterfly nectar and host plants that are drought-tolerant and we will have several of these at the Cockrell Butterfly Center’s Fall Plant Sale. We choose the hardiest perennials and annuals to help you stock up your landscape before the fall butterfly rush.

Here is my top 10 plant list for this fall:

1.Cassia splendida, Flowery Senna or Yellow Senna

Cassia splendida

1. Flowery Senna or Yellow Senna (Cassia splendida): This perennial shrub is covered in bright yellow clusters of flowers from fall through winter. It is also the host plant for several sulfur butterfly larvae. Cassia can reach heights of 6 to 12 feet tall, likes full sun, and has average water needs.

2. Fringed Twinevine (Funastrum cynanchoidies): This perennial vine is a great butterfly attractor for the fall. The pale pink flowers look similar to milkweed flowers, since they are in the same family, Apocynaceae. In fact, twinevine (unfortunately) attracts the yellow oleander aphid, just like milkweed! Monarchs will not lay eggs on the plant, but the caterpillars will eat the leaves in desperate times when milkweed is not available. Queen caterpillars will also eat this plant. This unusual plant is native to the southwestern United States, including south Texas. It is a twining vine and will need some sort of trellising.

3. Fall Mistflower or Common Floss Flower (Eupatorium odoratum, or Chromolaena odoratum): When the pale blue flowers of this plant appear, they are swarmed by many species of butterflies. The bushy plant grows 3 to 5 feet high and has low water needs. Plant in full sun for maximum blooms. Note that it only blooms for about 3 weeks, starting mid-to-late October, but the butterfly show is worth the wait.

Liatris sp., Blazing Star

Liatris sp.

4. Blazing Star (Liatris sp.): This Texas native perennial is a great nectar plant for summer and early fall. It likes full sun and is drought tolerant. The bloom spikes reach 3 to 4 feet tall. It also attracts hummingbirds!

Spicebush Swallowtail caterpillar

Spicebush Swallowtail caterpillar

5. Sassafras (Sassafras albidum): This tree is also a native to Texas. It usually occurs as an understory tree at the edge of wooded areas, so they like a little bit of shade. They can reach up to 30 feet tall and, once their root system is established, they are drought tolerant. This tree has wonderful fall color and is also deciduous, which means that they drop all of their leaves in winter. So, if your Sassafras looks like sticks, don’t worry, it will come back in the spring. Another great thing about this tree (and the reason why we sell it) is that it is a host plant for the Spicebush Swallowtail. The utter cuteness of the Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar, in my opinion, makes it a great ambassador for butterfly gardening. It is a favorite of many butterfly enthusiasts.

6. Corell’s Obedient Plant (Physostegia corellii):  A Texas native, this perennial likes full to partial shade and needs regular watering. Plant height reaches about 3 feet tall and the pink flower spikes bloom mid to late summer. It is a great nectar plant for butterflies and hummingbirds.

7. Brazilian Pipevine (Aristolochia fimbriata): This trailing groundcover with attractive, slightly variegated, roundish leaves, likes part shade and average watering, but will become drought tolerant when established. The plant is named after its flowers, which resemble small tobacco pipes. These unusual maroon-colored flowers attract flies to pollinate them with their “fragrance” of rotting meat. The flies think this is a good place to lay their eggs, but in reality they are just doing the plant’s bidding! This plant is also the host for the native Pipevine Swallowtail and the more tropical Polydamas Swallowtail. The funky looking caterpillars can devour the foliage all the way to the ground, but luckily the plant is ready for this and will flush out new growth from its fleshy underground storage root. If you want this plant for raising caterpillars you should plant several to have enough food for your babies.

Pipevine Swallowtail caterpillar

Pipevine Swallowtail caterpillar

8. Frog Fruit (Lippia nodiflora): This native groundcover likes full sun to partial shade and blooms spring through early winter. It is a good nectar plant for small butterflies like hairstreaks and skippers. The leaves are also a host for buckeye larvae. If you have a large open space that needs some groundcover, this is the plant for you! Otherwise, you may want to contain its vigorous growth.

9. Mexican Caesalpinnia (Caesalpinnia mexicana): This woody perennial reaches 7 to 8 feet high, and produces large clusters of yellow flowers from early summer through early winter. A great nectar plant for butterflies, it likes full sun and is drought tolerant.

Red Rocket Russelia


Red Rocket Russelia

10. Red Rocket Russelia (Russelia sarmentosa):  This tender perennial is a great nectar plant for butterflies and hummingbirds. It likes full sun to part shade and is drought tolerant, and bears “fiery” red spikes of flowers that bloom from summer to fall.. For some reason it is not found in garden centers lately, but we have it!

The Semi-Annual Plant Sale will be held Saturday, October 12 from 9:00 a.m. to noon, or until we sell out of plants. Come early, because the plants go fast!

Visit our butterfly beauties at Primavera through April 7 at the Houston Galleria!

Every year, the Houston Galleria hosts Primavera: a springtime celebration of all things blooming. As in the past, the Museum got in on Primavera this year with a butterfly garden installation:

The Cockrell Butterfly Center staff hits The Galleria for Primavera 2013

Visit our flappers in their fabulous temporary digs through April 7 on the ground floor of Galleria 4, in between Ann Taylor and Gigi’s Asian Bistro.

The Cockrell Butterfly Center staff hits The Galleria for Primavera 2013

Cockrell Butterfly Center Director Nancy Greig (ever-accessorized, below) says we’ve got 20 species hanging out.

The Cockrell Butterfly Center staff hits The Galleria for Primavera 2013Most are rice paper butterflies and longwings, but there are a few lacewings and other beauts in there, as well.

The Cockrell Butterfly Center staff hits The Galleria for Primavera 2013The butterflies are being fed, for the time being, via plastic loofahs soaked in sugar water — the same preferred diet doled out by your average hummingbird feeder.

The Cockrell Butterfly Center staff hits The Galleria for Primavera 2013Want to learn more about butterflies and butterfly gardening? Hit up our semi-annual Plant Sale this April 6 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and learn how to make your own butterfly habitat (greenhouse not included).

The Cockrell Butterfly Center staff hits The Galleria for Primavera 2013

From left, Cockrell staff Lauren Williamson, (THE) Zac Stayton, and Nancy Greig

This semi-annual sale’s not about skivvies, it’s all about Skippers (and Painted Ladies, Nymphalids + more): The Semi-Annual Plant Sale!

I think we can all agree that butterflies are awesome. They are familiar and beautiful, but there are also some little guys out there that hardly ever get a second glance. I’m talking about hairstreaks, smaller nymphalids, skippers and the like. From far away, these butterflies may not seem like much, but up close they are just as pretty as a giant swallowtail.

Hairstreaks

Let’s start off with one of my all time favorites: the hairstreaks. These members of the Lycaenid, or “gossamer winged,” family get their name from the thin, hair-like lines that cross the under surfaces of their wings. Many of the hairstreaks have slender “tails” on their hindwings, which resemble antennae on the wrong part of the body! While resting they will rub their hindwings together, causing their “tails” to wiggle. Coupled with colored eyespots, this makes their back-end look just like a false head. This illusion comes in handy with predators, attracting them to the wrong end of the body, allowing the butterfly a quick escape in the opposite direction.

Semi-Annual Plant Sale | Oct. 6, 2012Hair Streak

The hairstreaks are fast butterflies with erratic flight patterns. They can also be hard to view because of their size — from ½ inch to only about 1 ¾ inch in wingspan — so it can be hard to identify different ones in the field. If you do come across a hairstreak, however, try to get a good look — they’re worth it! Some species of hairstreaks have only one brood per year in the spring, while others have several from spring through fall.

You generally can’t attract hairstreaks to your garden with host plants. They eat a wide variety of larval foods, depending on the species — some are dried up leaves, mistletoe (try planting that one!), hackberry, oaks, cedar, pine and a variety of legumes. The best way to attract hairstreaks to your garden is by planting the nectar plants that they like. Some good ones are almond verbena, lantana, asters, frog fruit — anything with really small, tubular shaped flowers arranged in clusters.

Nymphalids

Nymphalids, or “brush-footed” butterflies, are also some of my favorites. This family of butterflies takes its name from their highly reduced front legs, which are covered in tiny hairs and resemble brushes. At first glance, it appears these butterflies have only four legs. This family is very diverse in size and shape, without many recognizable characteristics in common. As adults, however, many do not visit flowers for nectar, but rather feed on tree sap, rotting fruit, dung and carrion. These guys know how to survive a drought!

Semi-Annual Plant Sale | Oct. 6, 2012Texas Crescent

You may see some of these butterflies flying about on warm winter days. Some species overwinter as larvae and/or adults; however, they won’t breed until host plants become available in the spring.

Some of my favorite “brushfoot” butterflies in Houston are the Texan Crescent, the Question Mark and the American Painted Lady.

The Texan Crescent (Anthanassa texana) is tiny — up to 1 ¾ inches in wingspan. They are around for much of the year, spring through fall. Their host plants include members of the Acanthus family: flame acanthus, ruellia, dicliptera, shrimp plant. When you get caterpillars, you will have lots, so expect your “fruit cocktail” shrimp plant to be stripped!

Question marks (Polygonia interrogationis) are gorgeous! If Stevie Nicks were a butterfly, she would be this one, with its dark purple, velvety, gypsy-like wings. I have seen question marks in the country covering the sides of dirt roads, absorbing minerals. Their larvae feed on the leaves of elm and hackberry trees, and sometimes nettles. These butterflies are out during most of the year, hibernating during the winter and estivating (becoming dormant) during the summer. One sat for days on my outdoor ceiling fan this summer. They are on the larger side, size-wise — up to 3 inches across.

Semi-Annual Plant Sale | Oct. 6, 2012Question Mark

American Painted Lady (Vanessa virginiensis) butterflies are about 2 inches wide and are abundant in spring and fall. Their favorite host plants are in the Aster family. I learned that the larvae of this butterfly feed on the curry plant — which we will have at the fall sale!

Skippers

Skippers are cute little creatures that have been classified as an “intermediate” between butterflies and moths. However, most lepidopterists agree that they are more closely related to butterflies. Skippers have stout, hairy bodies with large heads. Their antennae are spaced far apart, more on the sides of their head, with a curled hook at the end instead of the usual clubbed antennae seen in “typical” butterflies. Their wingspan usually measures less than one inch, except for the long-tailed skippers, which may be over 2 inches across.

Semi-Annual Plant Sale | Oct. 6, 2012Fiery Skipper

Depending on the species, in the larval stage, skippers eat mostly oaks, mallows, legumes and grasses. You may have some of these in your lawn or garden right now!

Skippers often drink nectar from low growing flowers. I have seen them many times on trailing lantana by the Museum greenhouses. They also like to imbibe nutrients and salts from shallow mud puddles.

Their flight is fast, whirling and erratic, so the best way to observe them is while they are perched on a flower sipping nectar.

The HMNS Semi-Annual Plant Sale

When: Saturday, October 6th from 9 a.m. to noon
Where: On the 7th level of the museum parking garage
How Much: FREE

We’ll have all the necessities: milkweed, pipe-vine, passion-vine, porterweeds, lantana, pentas, and more. We will also have a lot of the favorite plants of those “lesser known” butterflies that I’m sure you will now be looking for this fall!

If you plan on coming to the sale, please come early to get the best selection. To make life easier on yourself, please bring your own wagon.

See you Saturday!