Science Doesn’t Sleep (9.3.08)

red red wine
Creative Commons License photo credit: elusive.

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

Coming soon: Chardonnay-dioactive. Nuclear scientists put on their sleuth hats to help stop a crime that’s keeping us all up at night: wine fraud.

Attention, Alabama and Georgia – time to start securing your knives, forks and any other sharp metal objects that might be lying around: scientists in Florida are building the world’s most powerful magnet.

You know him from Mythbusters, but he’s also obsessed with the dodo – here, a paean to extreme geekitude.

No matter where you are, Google can see you – better than anyone else. At least they will when their new, exclusive satellite launches.

NASA is going to spiff up the Hubble Telescope – one last time.

Oil goo: a Houston startup has developed a new technology that squeezes hard-to-reach oil out of wells.

Space is stealing our oxygen.

Science Doesn’t Sleep (8.26.08)

No 296!.....I am NOT a Number..lol..:O)
Creative Commons License photo credit: law_keven

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

According to new analysis of satellite imagery, cows tend to face “moo North” – indicating that they somehow sense Earth’s magnetism.

The goblin shark is so strange-looking – and you can check it out in this video from Japan.

Victory for the caveman! According to new research, Neanderthal technology was no less advanced than early human technology. (So, they didn’t go extinct because they were dumb) Also smarter than you think: goldfish.

Now you can decide for yourself whether CERN is about to destroy the Earth: they’ve published all the techincal details online, at the Journal of Instrumentation, and it’s free to read without a subscription.

What happens when our technology becomes smarter than we are?

Science Doesn’t Sleep (8.21.08)

LED
What does this sound like?
Creative Commons License photo credit: yuri_koval

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

A new population of a species of rare leopards has been discovered in the forest in Borneo – providing new hope for this endangered species.

By analyzing Oetzi the Iceman’s clothing, scientists have discovered that the famous Neolithic man favored fashions made from sheep and cattle – indicating he was a herdsman. Their technique could have an impact on today’s fashion industry.

Can you hear light? New research thinks you can do anything you put your mind to.

Couldn’t afford a satellite for Christmas last year? Not to worry – they’re getting smaller - and cheaper.

Proof that you never know what you’ll find on eBay: a scientists bought a fossilized bug online and it turned out to be a previously unknown species of aphid.

Science Doesn’t Sleep – Earth Day!

Creative Commons License photo credit: Xirzon

So here’s what went down since you logged off.

It’s Earth Day! And what’t the most annoying thing about saving the planet? Everything is way more expensive when its made out of organic, renewable bamboo. The Chronicle’s guide to going green without breaking the bank has you covered. You can take all that money you save and go shopping…or check out the Nature Conservancy’s ideas for green living.

Earth Day is no laughing matter,” say 46 comic strip artists. Irony of using a product printed on millions of reams of newspaper in order to make this point apparently lost.

Scientists find the earliest known example of oil painting, in Buddhist caves dating to the 5th to 9th century – 6 to 10 centuries before the technique was thought to have been developed in Europe.

Lizards from Italy are evolutionary whiz kinds - 5 mating pairs were transplanted to Croatia 3 decades ago, and their descendants have evolved a completely new gut structure, larger heads and a stronger bite – changes that should take millions of years.

Creative Commons License photo credit: shareski

If you can make a tiny satellite, you could win a tiny (well, relatively) prize! The just announced “N-prize” (a takeoff of Google’s X-prize, valued at $30 million) offers 9999.99 pounds to the first person to “put a tiny satellite that weighs less than 19.99 grams – the weight of about two British pound coins or four US quarters – into orbit on a budget of only 999.99 pounds (about $2000). The satellite must complete nine orbits around the Earth, and this must somehow be verifiable from the ground.”