Ace your after-school activities: Build a robot from scratch with our LEGO Robotics class

Have you ever wondered how to program robots to do even the simplest task? Well,  it takes a lot of background work, to say the least. But in our LEGO Robotics after-school program, we teach students how to build a LEGO Mindstorm NXT robot from scratch — and how to program it to perform certain tasks.

Every Tuesday for 10 weeks, students learn basic programming, and they use that programming to solve weekly challenges. The challenges increase in difficulty as the students become more familiar with the programming and their robots. By week 10, students know how to program their robots to reverse, make turns and maneuver in a square formation.

In addition, students will learn how to work with different types of sensors that can be attached to the robot, including the ultrasonic sensor. When students learn how to program using the ultrasonic sensor, their robot can navigate through a specified course without running into a single obstacle!

lego_roboticsLEGO Robotics is a great way for students to gain experience with technology in a small class environment. One of our parents commented, “Aaron has really enjoyed this class. He is always excited to share what he has learned in class!”

The classes are open to children in grades 4 through 7, and they’re held at both the main HMNS location and the HMNS at Sugar Land. If you are looking for an educational after-school program, look no further than LEGO Robotics!

HMNS at Hermann Park: Tuesdays
March 26 – May 28
4:30 – 6 pm
$240 / $190 Members

HMNS at Sugar Land: Thursdays
March 28 – May 30
4:30 – 6 pm
$240 / $190 Members

Ready to get a piece of the fun? Register here!

 

Science Doesn’t Sleep (8.28.08)

Box Turtle Closeup
Creative Commons License photo credit: audreyjm529

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

Paleontologists have found the fossil of a 75-million year old pregnant turtle – something that has never before been found.

We’re lucky to have the Gueymard telescope – one of the largest in the country for public viewing – right in our backyard. But looking into the heavens wasn’t always so easy. Check out this list of 20 things you didn’t know about telescopes.

Are we giving robots too much power? The Onion weighs in.

Now we play the guessing game: what will happen with Hurricane Gustav?

Photos: a new statue of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius has just been uncovered in Turkey.

Science Doesn’t Sleep (8.19.08)

Hungry dolphin
He really knows himself.
Creative Commons License photo credit: robertpaulyoung

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

I reflect, therefore, I am: commonly known in elephants, dolphins and great apes, self-recognition has long been deemed a key determinate of advanced cognitive abilities in animals. Now, we’ve discovered that magpies can do it.

Back to school: kids are still savoring the last days of summer, but teachers spending their first days back at HMNS, soaking up science and learning ways to use the exhibits here to bring science to life for their students next year.

Another humpback whale is lost; this time, a calf, in the waters outside Sydney. It’s bonded to a yacht, and if an adult female doesn’t come by soon, it may not survive.

No wonder bees are dying in record numbers: their hives are filled with pesticides.

Coming soon – Robots: part of a balanced diet.

The 1918 flu epidemic killed between 20 – 100 million people worldwide; survivors of the epidemic alive today still have circulating antibodies to the disease, 80 90 years later.

An old wive’s tale that’s somewhat true: severe morning sickness increases the possibility of delivering a baby girl.

Science Doesn’t Sleep (8.18.08)

Robot Vista
Creative Commons License photo credit: Kiwi Flickr

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

Robots: they’re so hot right now. A new surveillance bot looks really cool – but it’s also extremely noisy (and so not very good for surveillance.) And – this robot could save your life.

A humpback whale has lost its way, somehow ending up in the Baltic Sea – an area that lacks the food it will need to survive.

What’s it like to be an Olympian’s brain?

It only stood waist high, but it might have given Usain Bolt a run for his money – the small British Ornithopod Hypsilophodon foxii was so fast it had a special adaptation to keep its ribs from rattling at top speeds.

Shockingly, Bigfoot find turns out to be a hoax. (Though with a web site like this, I can see why major networks attended the “press conference.”)

The NASA spacecraft Cassini has taken “razor-sharp” images of 1000-meter deep fissures in the surface of Enceladus, one of Saturn’s moons – a place believed likely to contain life (or at least, more likely than other places in space).

A new study from the Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center indicates that low density foods may be the key to weight loss. Sponsored by the Mushroom Council, the study recommends foods that have a low ration of calories to volume, like…mushrooms.

As Arctic ice melts, Canada will search for the remains of a 19th century expedition that was lost in pursuit of the Northwest Passage.