HMNS’ 100th year comes to a close…

And what a year it’s been!

All throughout 2009, we’ve celebrated our hundredth year in Houston with a dedicated web site, a series of 100 fun family events; a showcase of our 100 favorite/most amazing/coolest artifacts; a video series with our longest-serving staff (the record is 39 years!), and a contest (which you can still enter for a chance to win a 2010 Museum membership!)

You can also check out 100 years of Museum history here: from our very first Museum bulletin in January 2010 through historic scientific expeditions, ambitious building projects and blockbuster exhibitions, it’s been quite a trip!

But we’re even more excited about what’s coming next – in our second century of science.

In fact, we’ve just broken ground on perhaps our most ambitious project yet: an expansion that will double the amount of public exhibition space that will be available for temporary and permanent exhibitions – including what we intend to be the world’s finest Hall of Paleontology; double the number of classrooms available for educational programs; and triple the amount of available collections storage space, to ensure the conservation and care of our collections for decades to come.

President Joel A. Bartsch talks about what’s next for the Museum in this video – and how you can help.

Help us continue and expand our mission of science education for even greater numbers of children and adults. Donate to the expansion today – and join our Cause on Facebook to help spread the word!

Happy New Year!

HOW TO: pH paper from a Poinsetta

PLEASE NOTE: PARENTAL HELP IS A MUST ON THIS PROJECT

Poinsettia
Creative Commons License photo credit: Southernpixel

Materials:
Parental help
Red petals from a poinsettia plant
Blender
Microwave
Coffee filters
Microwave safe dish
Baking soda mixed with water (test substance)
Vinegar (test substance)
Strainer
Straw or medicine dropper

What to do:

1. Grab your parents to help you.
2. Put the red parts of the poinsettia in a blender with a small amount of water and blend.
3. Transfer this mixture to a microwave safe dish and microwave with water (enough to cover the plant material) for about 1 minute and let steep like tea.
4. Strain the mixture and throw away the plant matter and reserve the liquid.

| Poinsettia  |
Creative Commons License photo credit: arquera

5. Soak several coffee filters in this mixture until they are colored. Allow them to dry.
6. Cut them into strips.
7. Use a medicine dropper or straw to apply different solutions such as vinegar or the baking soda solution to the paper. What happens?
8. What color does it turn when it is exposed to an acid (vinegar)?
9. What color does it turn when it is exposed to a base (baking soda solution)?
10. Can you find other acids or bases in your house?

What’s going on here?
Many different plants have pigments that are very sensitive to changes in acidity. The poinsettia is one example and red cabbage is another. When acids or bases come into contact with the paper dyed with the plant extract, a wonderful color change occurs!