Spring Plant Sale!! This Saturday, 4/9

The Cockrell Butterfly Center is having its Spring Plant Sale Saturday, April 9, 2011, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the 7th level of the parking garage at the Houston Museum of Natural Science.

Make sure to get there early as plants do sell out! This post is by Soni, one of our Butterfly Center horticulturalists.

HMNS Fall Plant Sale
See more photos from the Spring Plant Sale on Flickr.

We have nectar plants and host plants to attract butterflies to your garden. This year, we have been working on propagating more native plants. This includes:

Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta)
Giant Coneflower (Rudbeckia maxima)
Mexican Blanket (Gaillardia pulchella)
American Basket Flower (Centaurea Americana
Creeping Spot Flower (Acmella oppositifolia)
Maypop Passion Vine (Passiflora incarnata)
And others!

Tithonia
See more photos from the Spring Plant Sale on Flickr.

Some of you are probably seasoned butterfly gardeners, but some may be asking yourselves:

How do you garden for butterflies?

The answer is really simple. There are two types of plants that you need to have for a successful butterfly garden: nectar and host plants. Nectar plants have blooms that produce a sugary liquid that butterflies need to consume in order to survive. Some examples of these plants are Porter Weed, Echinacea (Purple Cone Flower), Zinnias, Rudbeckia (Brown and Black-eyed Susans), Monarda (Bee Balm), Lantana, Salvias, Eupatorium (Mistflower), Cuphea, Buddleia, and Tithonia (Mexican Sunflower) among many others.

Gaillardia
See more photos from the Spring Plant Sale on Flickr.

The other type of plants that you need are host plants. Some examples of these are: Asclepias (Milkweed), Passionvine, Citrus, Rue, Fennel, Aristolochia (Pipevine), and Cassias. These are plants that the female butterflies lay eggs on. Certain species of butterflies will only lay their eggs on specific plants such as the Monarch, which only lays eggs on Milkweed. If you see caterpillars on these plants, that is a good thing! Those caterpillars are baby butterflies! The host plant is their food source, which means that the caterpillar eats the leaves. If you want a garden to attract butterflies, but don’t want insects eating away at the foliage, just use nectar plants.

Create a Local Butterfly Habitat!

A lot of these plants are native to Texas and the good thing about this sale is that the Cockrell Butterfly Center specifically chooses plants that will attract the native butterflies and will perform well in the Houston area. If you are not sure what to do or have any questions about gardening for butterflies, our experts will be at the sale to answer them. Come early, the plants go fast!