A Nature Walk through Hermann Park

Wax myrtle is a tree that is eaten by the 5 species of exotic walking sticks that we have here in the Cockrell Butterfly Center, as well as some of our grasshoppers and other herbivores. Recently, while trying to catch dragonflies (don’t ask), I stumbled upon not one, or two, but tons of these trees in Hermann Park! They were all over the place between the Japanese Gardens and the Houston Zoo. Now, every week I have a nice walk down to that part of Hermann Park to enjoy these trees, and every time I go, it’s a different adventure! 

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Creative Commons License photo credit: emills1
A handsome Wood Duck

Today I thought I would take my camera and document some of the great things I saw: vibrant wildflower plants, amazing wildlife and people enjoying a beautiful day. It’s a really nice way to get out of the office and I always look forward to what I’ll see. I love all kinds of wildlife, not just bugs of course!

Hermann Park is filled with so many different species, especially birds, many of which are ducks. The wood duck is just one of the most beautiful I’ve seen. Their colors are amazing and they have such a distinguished look. These ducks nest in trees near water sources. The ducklings jump out of the nest, falling several feet to the ground without being hurt. Many people consider them the most beautiful water bird, and I can see why. This duck was not shy with the camera!

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Creative Commons License photo credit: emills1
Great Blue Heron

Another bird that I am always happy to see is the Great Blue Heron. The first time I saw one of these take flight, I was so impressed. They are huge birds, but are so graceful and delicate. Seeing these majestic birds completely makes me forget that I’m in the middle of the 4th largest city in the United States. There were two of them today, hiding behind tall plants in the water. Luckily one came out of hiding for me! 

My visits have become even more special recently with the beginning of spring. Dragonflies and butterflies have taken to the air. Aquatic insects dart around the surface of the ponds, feeding fish, tadpoles and baby turtles. The babies are my very favorite part of spring! I’ve been lucky enough to encounter several ducklings on my last couple of visits. Their numbers have decreased, but the surviving ducklings are getting bigger and depending less on their mothers. I saw one today swimming by itself looking for food. It’s still pretty fuzzy and cute!

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Creative Commons License photo credit: emills1
A duckling – how precious!
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Creative Commons License photo credit: emills1

I was also able to photograph a dragonfly. If you’ve ever tried, you know it can be very frustrating! They scare so easily and it’s so hard to get up close. The key is definitely patience. Dragonflies are very territorial and will always come back to the same perch or one near it. If you keep at it, you will be able to catch a couple of shots of one.

Once I had gathered enough food for my insects and lollygagged around enough, I started to make my way back to work – but not without seeing the very familiar, adorable face of a squirrel. I’ve always loved squirrels for their cuteness and fun-loving personalities. They definitely have a way of helping me to forget about any stress. You can’t watch them without snickering a little bit. This squirrel seemed a little confused about what I was doing, but he gave me some really great poses.

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Creative Commons License photo credit: emills1

I really should bring my camera every time, as today was actually kind of a slow day for wildlife. I’ve also seen nutria, red-eared sliders, box turtles, whistling ducks, sea gulls, bull frogs, and tons of insects! Hermann Park really is a gem. It is such a historically significant part of our city and it is filled with so many simple, wonderful things to do. I encourage everyone to get out every once in a while to enjoy nature wherever it may be. You never know what you will see and how it can brighten your day!

Happy nature watching! 

Protection from Predators

Butterflies will lay eggs on host
plants, like this Cassia alata. But,
how do you protect the caterpillars
that emerge from hungry predators
in your garden?

This week, I received a phone call from a museum patron who was concerned about wasps capturing her Gulf fritillary caterpillars from her Passionflower vine in her butterfly habitat and flying off with them. Because her host plant was a vine, it was not possible to protect the caterpillars from predatory attack; she would just have to allow nature to take its natural course.

There are however, a few methods we can suggest to you for protecting your caterpillars from predators. One method is to drape bridal-tulle (fine mesh) over the existing host plant within your garden. This tulle can be supported by a frame such as a tomato cage. Stitch up the sides of the mesh with a hem stitch so that the stitches are touching one another this way, the predators have no entrance. Along the bottom edge of the tulle you can pierce v-shaped wires into the soil. You can make these with an old wire hanger and a wire cutter. You should secure the bottom edge of the tulle by inserting it into the soil to a depth of about 1-2”. Wasps and Yellow Jackets will try to enter the enclosure through the bottom if they know a food source exists.

Another method of protecting caterpillars from predators is to remove the caterpillars from the host plant and place the caterpillar and its food source into a secure container with air holes or a screen or tulle covering for air circulation. You can use and old aquarium, pickle jar, Rubbermaid container etc. as a temporary home. Place a clean paper towel at the base of the container each day. You do not want to leave the frass (waste) in the container because it will cause mold to grow.

In this photo, caterpillars of the Cloudless Sulphur,
Phoebis sennae species feed on their host plant, Cassia
alata. I always find it amazing that the butterflies
find their way up to the top of the parking garage
in search of specific host plants to lay their eggs on.

Today, I removed 12-15, caterpillars along with stems of fresh food and placed them into a container with holes in the top. Each day, I will spray the foliage within the container, put in fresh food and change out the paper towel. When the caterpillars are molting, they will remain stationary for 4-8 hours. Once they shed their skin, they are very fragile. It is best not to disturb them at this time. Some caterpillars crawl off and rest upon the side of the container for this period of time before and after molting. You don’t want to place your container in a sunny window because this will cause the interior temperature to rise to an uncomfortable level. If you have fine mesh on the top though, that is OK. In that case, you should mist more than two times a day with a spray bottle of water.

Finally, whether or not you have housed your caterpillars in the garden or in a container, they will soon pupate. Twelve to twenty-four hours before the butterfly emerges from the chrysalis you will see the wing coloration of the species just under the covering of the chrysalis. When the butterfly does emerge it has to spread its wings to dry. Do not disturb it at this time, it is fragile. Touching it could possibly cause it to be deformed and you wouldn’t want that.

vôa borboletinha!
Creative Commons License photo credit: .mands.

In another twelve to twenty-four hours you can safely release it to your garden where it will immediately find a nectar source to feed upon. If it is cloudy and raining, the butterfly will roost under a stem or a leaf until the temperature reaches 78 degrees or above. Once its body temperature warms up it should take flight.

Upon flight it will seek out its host and nectar sources so be sure to have plenty on hand in your garden for your new friends. I hope this sheds a little light on how you might save some of your beautiful caterpillars from predation in the future. Protecting them with an artificial environment is an easy thing to do.

Science Doesn’t Sleep (4.23.08)

 

Creative Commons License photo credit: ComeIlMare

So here’s what went down since you logged off.

Did seeing Bambi as a kid make you want to save the whales? It may have just made you more likely to be killed by a bear.

If only Catherine of Aragon had laid off the plum pudding, Henry could’ve avoided that whole Anne Boleyn debacle. New evidence suggests that a child’s gender is associated with the mother’s diet.

A new map of the Gulf has just been published that may help us predict where hurricanes will make landfall much earlier – giving us that much more time to sit stranded on I-45.  

Our first contact with aliens might not be a “carbon-based occasion;” Stephen Hawking made a prediction about the likelihood of humanity surviving our intial contact with extraterrestrial life at NASA’s 50th anniversary this past Monday. In short, the aliens may come in peace – but their microbes will probably kill us anyway.

Geology students hit the mother lode (or, why you should keep studying science, kids!) Geology.com points us to news that geology grads are making 80K/year - right out of school.