To School and Beyond


It’s that time of year again! Whether you love heading back to school or wishing summer would last another month, there’s still time to visit the always exciting exhibits at the museum as well as shop for the coolest things to set you apart from all the other students. We’re here to help!

Shop our site from August 3rd to August 21st and when you spend $50 or more, you receive 15% off your purchase and free shipping.

Shop in-store this weekend (Aug.5th-Aug.7th) during Texas Tax Free Weekend and save on school supplies, exclusive HMNS tees, and unique backpacks.

A few of our fave items:

Pack meals in Lunch Bugs, the sandwich bags with a supersized creepy-crawly printed right on it.

Pack meals in Lunch Bugs, the sandwich bags with a supersized creepy-crawly printed right on it.

A set of colorful bookmarks depicting the evolutionary progress of our species will hold your place.

A set of colorful bookmarks depicting the evolutionary progress of our species will hold your place.

Don’t find yourself sitting at your desk all set to eat lunch and realize you have no utensils to use. Each one of these cool pens has a cap with a convenient eating utensil built right in to it.

Don’t find yourself sitting at your desk all set to eat lunch and realize you have no utensils to use. Each one of these cool pens has a cap with a convenient eating utensil built right in to it.

A pencil that will surely last the whole school year.

A pencil that will surely last the whole school year.

Button flair with a little humor.

Button flair with a little humor.

Book bags with a bite. These backpacks aren't as tough as they look - they're actually quite soft but still cool.

Book bags with a bite. These backpacks aren’t as tough as they look – they’re actually quite soft but still cool.

Stay social with us @shopHMNS

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  • Instagram: Follow for your chance to win our Back to School Giveaway!


Summer Trunk Shows: A Touch of Sparkle from Lankford and Tummino

One of our favorite things about summer has arrived — Summer Trunk Shows! This year we’re keeping it simple and local, featuring Rebecca Lankford July 22 and Mirta Tummino on Aug. 5, both from 12 to 4 p.m.


Locally-renowned Houston artist Rebecca Lankford uses hand-cast metals, fine leathers, and a casual take on precious and semi-precious gems to create effortlessly stylish jewels. Her delicate styles are perfect alone and for layering and stacking.

Rebecca has also created an exclusive museum collection for HMNS using gems hand-picked by our buyers. Each piece is one-of-a-kind or limited in production.




Leaving corporate America behind, native Texan Mirta Tummino realized her true calling when she began designing jewelry. With an eye for color, Mirta combines unusual gemstones to create her signature wire-wrapped designs.


If that alone doesn’t convince you to attend our trunk show here are three reasons why you should:

1. Locally-made, handcrafted jewelry. Handmade pieces make unique gifts for others or yourself, all while supporting local artists.

2. A chance to meet the designer and team. Learn all about the gems, materials, and the creative process directly from the artist. Rebecca and Mirta are both inspired by the museum’s gem and mineral collection.

3. Jewelry with savings! Shop with a 20 percent discount in addition to your membership discount. Feel good about looking great knowing that 100 percent of museum store and trunk show proceeds benefits HMNS’s educational programs.

Have Science Fun in the Summer Sun with a Solar Print Kit!

by Marina Torres

Texas heat is here, and school’s out for summer. With all that bright sun outside, it’s a great time to play under the open sky. In the spirit of the season, we took science outside with a do-it-yourself kit from our own Museum Store. This super fun and educational solar print kit really leaves an impression! With this kit, you can challenge your children’s imagination and keep them active.


Here’s what it comes with:12 five-by-seven pieces of solar paper, two print frame holders, two pre-printed stencil sheets and three blank note cards with envelopes so kids can share their finished projects with friends and families.


And here’s how it works: First, lay everything out.

Cut out the pre-printed stencil images and gather the items you’d like to use in your image. In a dim room, place the solar sheet (located inside the black envelope) under the frame, with the blue side facing up. Place the items on top of the sheet and close the frame.


Carefully place the system under the bright summer sun for about three minutes or until the sheet turns white.


Gather your items and prints out of the sun, then rinse under running water and let them dry.


Voila! You’ve merged art and science into one, and created these super cool solar images!


Visit the Museum Store or shop online for this solar print kit and other DIY kits or browse around for other summer toys. We’ve also opened an exciting new Cabinet of Curiosities section inspired by our newest exhibition. There’s never been a better time to start your own collection!

Editor’s Note: Marina is the Visual Manager for the Houston Museum of Natural Science Museum Store.

Behind the Scenes: Retablos Fit for an Icon

When you walk into the museum store, you may notice the elaborate display wall at the entrance. Here’s a behind-the-scenes look with our Creative Merchandising Director on how it all comes together.

This season’s display is a tribute to Mexican arts and culture and features a life-sized retablo complete with a Catrina figurine. My inspiration were the detailed nichos, or retablos, that are such a central part of Latin American folk art. These retablos are usually under 12 or 18 inches in height but I wanted to create a seven-foot-tall reproduction. 

Starting with a metal wedding arch I found at the local party supply, I wired a support cage along the back and sides of the arch. Foam core cut to size was wired onto the side to create the retablo doors. Then the real work began: covering the structure with a few hundred giant paper flowers!


Each of these flowers was made by hand, and I gave countless lessons to curious patrons on how to make them. Here’s what you do:

Take five sheets of tissue paper. Starting from the short side, accordion pleat into three to four-inch folds down the length of the tissue. Fold the pleated paper in half and twist a pipe cleaner around the center to hold the folds in place. Cut each end of the folded paper in a rounded shape to create your petals. Open up the folds and very gently, starting from the top sheet, pull each sheet of tissue toward the center pipe cleaner.

flower pile

The flowers were tied onto the arch, inside and out, and paper roses hot-glued to the doors. Next, I had to create our Catrina.


La Catrina is a popular figure on El Día de los Muertos. Originally a turn-of-the-century political cartoon by illustrator José Guadalupe Posada, La Catrina was popularized by artist Diego Rivera. Rivera’s famous mural Sueño de una Tarde Dominical en la Alameda Central prominently features La Catrina between Posada, a young Rivera, and Rivera’s wife Frida Kahlo. The mural is a visual commentary on the history of Mexico with La Catrina representing that all are equal in the face of death.

Using an old mannequin from our Exhibits department, I spray-painted it bright red and then painted on a traditional calavera face.



 I wanted our Catrina to reference artist and cultural icon Frida Kahlo and acknowledge her contributions to La Catrina’s popularity as well as Kahlo’s dedication to Mexican heritage. A rose headdress and Oaxacan blouse, similar to the huipil Kahlo was known for wearing, were added along with a white petticoat that resembles the Tehuana skirts she favored.


The final piece of clothing is a very special item. This ornate, heavy overskirt belongs to a local los matachines dancer. With roots in both Medieval Europe and Native American dance, los matachines dance on important feast days with Dec. 12, the feast day of La Virgen de Guadalupe, being one of the most important. Our dancer was not able to perform this holiday and generously loaned us her costume.

los matachines

Finishing up the display wall involved climbing up 20 feet to hang more flower pompoms from the ceiling and adding folk art pieces to the wall.



Our six-foot-tall papier maché skeleton guards the jewelry and retablos in the wall cases.



Though a challenging project, this display is one of my favorites. Thank you to everyone who stopped by to ask questions while I was working out there. I enjoyed getting the chance to talk about our beautiful and moving exhibit on the Virgin. And it’s the proceeds from the museum store that make it possible for the Houston Museum of Natural Science to develop these exhibits, so we are always grateful for your support and patronage.