Legacy Donors Help Fund the Future of HMNS

You explored the solar system. You had butterflies land on your shoulder. You were dazzled by the beauty of the best gems and minerals from around the world. You climbed mountains and swam in the ocean depths. You celebrated your grandson’s sixth birthday with the dinosaurs and inspired fourth-graders to like science. You’ve grown alongside the Houston Museum of Natural Science, and now you’re wondering how to help HMNS keep growing.

DSC05484If the museum has enriched your life, you may wish to consider a planned gift to create a legacy that will help secure its future. The museum depends on the generosity of its biggest fans to provide high-quality exhibitions and programs that keep pace with technology and scientific discovery. What better way to thank the museum than to donate a lasting gift through the Legacy Society like members Eleanor and Chuck Asaud? 

Chuck Asaud

Valued volunteers for the past 14 years, the Asauds share their considerable knowledge, experience and enthusiasm with the museum’s visitors on a regular basis and decided to deepen their commitment by generously including the museum in their estate planning.

“The museum is an important and rewarding chapter in our lives. We have made friends here, continued to learn and take part in meaningful work,” said Chuck. “The fact that we are able to work together at the museum is a nice benefit,” said Eleanor.


Chuck and Eleanor met at college in 1954 and have been partners in life since that time, raising three children and enjoying fulfilling careers. Eleanor spent 30 years as an elementary and preschool teacher, giving youngsters a solid and caring foundation for future learning. Chuck, a dedicated scientist, made significant contributions in the aerospace and energy industries as a metallurgist, developing special products and exotic materials. Much of his work was highly classified.

Retirement brought Chuck and Eleanor to HMNS where they give freely of their time. Both are Master Docents and like to volunteer in the Cockrell Butterfly Center and the Morian Hall of Paleontology. “We enjoy learning new things, and working with the curators and other volunteers,” said Eleanor. They are also regular volunteers at fundraising events where they greet guests and make everyone feel welcome.


Like most important aspects in the Asauds’ life, the decision to join the HMNS Legacy Society was a joint one. “We decided that there was no longer a need for me to be named as beneficiary in Chuck’s life insurance policy; I really don’t need it,” said Eleanor. “We know that the museum will put it to good use and that makes us happy,” said Chuck.

Mary Tour

Planned gifts can include bequests, retirement assets, life insurance policies, artifacts or the establishment of a charitable trust with the museum. Individuals who make these donations are eligible to join the HMNS Legacy Society and receive invitations to exclusive events, recognition in selected publications and are honored at our annual luncheon.

The process to sign up as a Legacy donor is simple and confidential. Once you’ve discussed your estate with your attorney or financial planner, visit our web site to sign up to donate.

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You’ve lived a lifetime with the museum. Help secure its future for generations to come. Join the Legacy Society today.

A Symbol of Culture: Francs Guinéens Paint a Picture of Life in Guinea

by Kaylee Gund

During a recent visit to the Museum’s offsite collections storage, one carving in particular caught my eye — the Nimba (D’mba). After living in Guinea for over a year, I immediately honed in on the familiar polished wood of the Nimba among the other West African pieces.


The Nimba.

The Nimba is a symbol of feminine power and fertility, carried on someone’s shoulders around the fields to ensure a bountiful harvest. It wasn’t one of the traditions in the region where I lived, but I still saw the Nimba almost every day in my village on the corner of the 5,000 FG (franc guinéen) note.


The Nimba appears on the corner of a 5,000 FG note.

Among many other traditional symbols, the Nimba has become an expression of national pride, as evidenced by the Guinean bank’s use of it on currency and as its logo. Guinean currency is an interesting mix of national and local identity. Each denomination represents a different culturally distinct region of the country, showing important symbols and economic activities for that region.


A gold mining operation appears on the back of a 500 FG note, paying homage to the major source of income for the Siguiri prefecture.

Haute Guinée, the eastern plateau, is featured on the 500 FG, complete with an image of gold mining on the back. A major source of income for the Siguiri prefecture, gold mining was also an occasional source of exasperation for schoolteachers, as our students would often leave for months at a time during a gold rush and “cherchent l’or,” or “search for gold.”


As you’ve probably noticed, the number of zeros behind monetary amounts in Guinea can be a bit intimidating. Pictured above is a whopping 16,600 FG, worth a little over $2 in the U.S.

What can all this money buy?


Bags of clean drinking water are sold for 500 FG each. Drinking water from the well is ill advised, so this is a worthwhile investment at $0.07.


At the peak of mango season, everyone has more fruit than they know what to do with. It spoils fast with no refrigeration, so piles of mangoes are sold for 2,000 FG (less than $0.30).


Prepared food, like this rice with potato leaf sauce, costs between 5,000 and 7,000 FG for a plate (around $1).

So many mundane things require money that it’s easy to forget what an incredible symbol it can be. Guinean currency gives a glimpse into the many traditions of its different regions, and while there is occasionally ethnic strife between groups and the road to democracy is still rocky, the entire nation is unified in using Guinean francs.

Culture is an incredible thing, and we’re lucky enough to have access to a rich treasure trove of it: from Ancient Egypt to the Amazonian rainforest, even the smallest things can hold great significance.

Next time you’re about to spend a dollar, take a look at what’s on it. You might be surprised!

Editor’s Note: Kaylee Gund is in Youth Education Sales at the Houston Museum of Natural Science. During her time in the Peace Corps, Gund was placed in Guinea to teach chemistry in the country’s national language, French.

100 Years – 100 Objects: Stone Money

The Houston Museum of Natural Science was founded in 1909 – meaning that the curators of the Houston Museum of Natural Science have been collecting and preserving natural and cultural treasures for a hundred years now. For this yearlong series, our current curators have chosen one hundred exceptional objects from the Museum’s immense storehouse of specimens and artifacts—one for each year of our history. Check back here frequently to learn more about this diverse selection of behind-the-scenes curiosities—we will post the image and description of a new object every few days.

This description is from Dirk, the museum’s curator of anthropology. He’s chosen a selection of objects that represent human cultures throughout time and around the world, that we’ll be sharing here – and on hmns.org – throughout the year.

stone-money-4x4So how do you count your riches? If you are an inhabitant of the Pacific island of Yap, the answer would be simple: look out of your window and count the circular stones lining your garden. Different cultures have different ways to represent monetary value.

The inhabitants of the Pacific Island of Yap chose stone as a medium to express this. As stone was not available on all islands and had to be transported by canoe, the larger the stone, the greater the effort and therefore also the value of the “coin.”

Considering the size of the stone we have in our collection, and comparing it against others that are much bigger – what we have might be called “small change.”

Explore thousands of years of Native American history in the John P. McGovern Hall of the Americas, a permanent exhibition at the Houston Museum of Natural Science.

You can see more images of this fascinating artifact – as well as the others we’ve posted so far this year – in the photo gallery on hmns.org.