Discovery Dome hits the George Observatory for weekends this summer!

Summers at the George Observatory are about to get a whole lot sweeter.

In addition to our normal (but extraordinary) telescope viewings and astronomy lectures, beginning June 1, we’ll also have our portable planetarium — the Discovery Dome — on-hand Friday and Saturday nights through Aug. 25.

HMNS Outreach Programs: Discovery Dome
This young astronomer loves the Discovery Dome!

Each weekend night — plus member nights and at family events — the Discovery Dome will show one of three rotating shows every half hour: Black Holes, We Choose Space, and Life in the Universe.

Black Holes, narrated by Star Trek: the Next Generation’s John de Lancie, explores the mystifying phenomena of black holes, their origin and the latest scientific knowledge about what exactly black holes are and how we can locate them.

We Choose Space details the real-life adventures of astronauts at the International Space Station and on the Moon during the Kennedy administration.

Life in the Universe brings viewers behind the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, exploring the planets in our solar system. From the birth and death of stars to the formation of distant galaxies, this show is jam-packed with visuals of the universe.

Tickets are $3 for the Discovery Dome show and $5 for telescope and astronomy lecture tickets. For $10, a package of telescope and astronomy lecture tickets, a Discovery Dome ticket and a pass to HMNS Sugar Land’s permanent exhibits is available.

The Discovery Dome will run Fridays from 7:30 to 10 p.m. and Saturdays from 3:30 to 10 p.m.

For more information about programming at the George Observatory and all our great summer events at Brazos Bend State Park, click here!

Is anyone else out there? [Life in the Universe]

Are we alone in the universe? Is there intelligent life out there?

If you escape from the city lights and stare up at the night sky, you will see hundreds of stars. With a telescope you can see thousands, and with the help of the Hubble and computers we can see millions of stars.

Our sun has eight (nine if you’re sentimental like me) planets circling it. Not every star is going to have planets, but others will have multiple. How many million of unexplored planets are there out in the universe? Also remember that most of the stars we can see are located within our own galaxy, and that there are countless other galaxies with countless other stars and planets.

With so many billions of planets and moons, I personally believe there is at least some form of life out there in the universe. And although these may just be simple life forms, there is also a good chance that there is intelligent life somewhere in the universe.

For those of you who stare up at the night sky and wonder about the universe, we have a new planetarium show just for you, opening today.

Life in the Universe first explores our own solar system and discusses the possibility and likelihood of whether there could be simple life hidden somewhere beneath the surface of a planet or moon. Second, it delves into the galaxy and universe around us, discussing whether or not we might be alone in the universe, and why we haven’t been able to find anyone else so far.

For those of you who are interested in whether or not little green men might soon invade, or just want to learn more about the solar system, the galaxy and the universe that we live in, come on down to the Burke Baker Planetarium and check out Life in the Universe.