Summer Trunk Shows: A Touch of Sparkle from Lankford and Tummino

One of our favorite things about summer has arrived — Summer Trunk Shows! This year we’re keeping it simple and local, featuring Rebecca Lankford July 22 and Mirta Tummino on Aug. 5, both from 12 to 4 p.m.


Locally-renowned Houston artist Rebecca Lankford uses hand-cast metals, fine leathers, and a casual take on precious and semi-precious gems to create effortlessly stylish jewels. Her delicate styles are perfect alone and for layering and stacking.

Rebecca has also created an exclusive museum collection for HMNS using gems hand-picked by our buyers. Each piece is one-of-a-kind or limited in production.




Leaving corporate America behind, native Texan Mirta Tummino realized her true calling when she began designing jewelry. With an eye for color, Mirta combines unusual gemstones to create her signature wire-wrapped designs.


If that alone doesn’t convince you to attend our trunk show here are three reasons why you should:

1. Locally-made, handcrafted jewelry. Handmade pieces make unique gifts for others or yourself, all while supporting local artists.

2. A chance to meet the designer and team. Learn all about the gems, materials, and the creative process directly from the artist. Rebecca and Mirta are both inspired by the museum’s gem and mineral collection.

3. Jewelry with savings! Shop with a 20 percent discount in addition to your membership discount. Feel good about looking great knowing that 100 percent of museum store and trunk show proceeds benefits HMNS’s educational programs.

TREND REPORT: Summer Embellishments

Summer season is here and we need a reason to update our jewelry box. New designs have arrived just in time. For the simple classic to the carefree spirit we have the finishing touch for any outfit.


Zoe Chicco
L.A. designer Zoe Chicco has created a fine jewelry collection that has become a modern classic. Everyday pieces significant enough to be worn alone but delicate enough to wear layered together. Designs marries 14k gold with diamonds and semi-precious gemstones such as opal and turquoise.


Based in New York, Ann Spence, founder of SheBee, has created designs that blend luxury with a carefree spirit. Featuring vibrant colors and modern silhouettes, her designs bring the vibrancy to match the summer heat.


Workhorse is the lovechild of twin sisters Amber & Nicole Sutton. They take old and forgotten curios and re-imagine them for today using 14k gold, sterling silver, diamonds and turquoise stones. Handmade with love in their Los Angeles studio, the twins create ‘modern heirlooms’, each with its own story to tell – all intended to act as the “workhorses” in your jewelry box.


Julie Rofman
Handwoven beaded cuffs/bracelets combining the craft of bead looming with current color combinations and geometric patterning reminiscent of Bauhaus designs. A mixture of matte, translucent, opaque and shiny glass beads make up each cuff, creating a unique color-field of sparkle.


TNEMNRODA [nem-row-da] eyewear collection is infused with luxe refinement with influences from Caribbean background and drawing inspiration from East and West Indian culture. Designer Samantha Smikle creates eyewear designs bejeweled in 14k gold plated metals, semiprecious stones and other transformative materials.

Behind the Scenes: Retablos Fit for an Icon

When you walk into the museum store, you may notice the elaborate display wall at the entrance. Here’s a behind-the-scenes look with our Creative Merchandising Director on how it all comes together.

This season’s display is a tribute to Mexican arts and culture and features a life-sized retablo complete with a Catrina figurine. My inspiration were the detailed nichos, or retablos, that are such a central part of Latin American folk art. These retablos are usually under 12 or 18 inches in height but I wanted to create a seven-foot-tall reproduction. 

Starting with a metal wedding arch I found at the local party supply, I wired a support cage along the back and sides of the arch. Foam core cut to size was wired onto the side to create the retablo doors. Then the real work began: covering the structure with a few hundred giant paper flowers!


Each of these flowers was made by hand, and I gave countless lessons to curious patrons on how to make them. Here’s what you do:

Take five sheets of tissue paper. Starting from the short side, accordion pleat into three to four-inch folds down the length of the tissue. Fold the pleated paper in half and twist a pipe cleaner around the center to hold the folds in place. Cut each end of the folded paper in a rounded shape to create your petals. Open up the folds and very gently, starting from the top sheet, pull each sheet of tissue toward the center pipe cleaner.

flower pile

The flowers were tied onto the arch, inside and out, and paper roses hot-glued to the doors. Next, I had to create our Catrina.


La Catrina is a popular figure on El Día de los Muertos. Originally a turn-of-the-century political cartoon by illustrator José Guadalupe Posada, La Catrina was popularized by artist Diego Rivera. Rivera’s famous mural Sueño de una Tarde Dominical en la Alameda Central prominently features La Catrina between Posada, a young Rivera, and Rivera’s wife Frida Kahlo. The mural is a visual commentary on the history of Mexico with La Catrina representing that all are equal in the face of death.

Using an old mannequin from our Exhibits department, I spray-painted it bright red and then painted on a traditional calavera face.



 I wanted our Catrina to reference artist and cultural icon Frida Kahlo and acknowledge her contributions to La Catrina’s popularity as well as Kahlo’s dedication to Mexican heritage. A rose headdress and Oaxacan blouse, similar to the huipil Kahlo was known for wearing, were added along with a white petticoat that resembles the Tehuana skirts she favored.


The final piece of clothing is a very special item. This ornate, heavy overskirt belongs to a local los matachines dancer. With roots in both Medieval Europe and Native American dance, los matachines dance on important feast days with Dec. 12, the feast day of La Virgen de Guadalupe, being one of the most important. Our dancer was not able to perform this holiday and generously loaned us her costume.

los matachines

Finishing up the display wall involved climbing up 20 feet to hang more flower pompoms from the ceiling and adding folk art pieces to the wall.



Our six-foot-tall papier maché skeleton guards the jewelry and retablos in the wall cases.



Though a challenging project, this display is one of my favorites. Thank you to everyone who stopped by to ask questions while I was working out there. I enjoyed getting the chance to talk about our beautiful and moving exhibit on the Virgin. And it’s the proceeds from the museum store that make it possible for the Houston Museum of Natural Science to develop these exhibits, so we are always grateful for your support and patronage.


Trunk Show features Masterson’s coveted glass art jewelry


Houstonian Mariquita Masterson has always had the eye of an artist. Thirty years ago, Mariquita was commissioned to design a glass table setting for an art gala. Working with the glass blower, she became fascinated with the chunks and shards of colorful glass and imagined the pieces set as jewelry. Fast forward three decades, and Mariquita’s hand-blown jewels have become a coveted status symbol within the Texas social scene.


Extending her artistic skills beyond her jewelry line, Mariquita has designed a stained glass window for the chapel at Houston’s non-profit Amazing Place adult wellness center and created an iconic necklace for the Absolut Artists advertising campaign.

ABSOLUT ARTIST Mariquita Masterson

While Mariquita’s designs are immediately recognizable, each piece of glass is one-of-a-kind as they are blown and slumped by hand from recycled materials. The glass is then hand set in custom sterling silver or gold vermeil settings.mariquita masterson ring grp

The incredible color selection of Mariquita Masterson’s glass will be on display July 24, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. All pieces will be 20% off the day of the show in addition to member discounts.


Feel good about looking great knowing that 100% of Museum Store and Trunk Show proceeds benefits HMNS’ educational programs.