Is anyone else out there? [Life in the Universe]

Are we alone in the universe? Is there intelligent life out there?

If you escape from the city lights and stare up at the night sky, you will see hundreds of stars. With a telescope you can see thousands, and with the help of the Hubble and computers we can see millions of stars.

Our sun has eight (nine if you’re sentimental like me) planets circling it. Not every star is going to have planets, but others will have multiple. How many million of unexplored planets are there out in the universe? Also remember that most of the stars we can see are located within our own galaxy, and that there are countless other galaxies with countless other stars and planets.

With so many billions of planets and moons, I personally believe there is at least some form of life out there in the universe. And although these may just be simple life forms, there is also a good chance that there is intelligent life somewhere in the universe.

For those of you who stare up at the night sky and wonder about the universe, we have a new planetarium show just for you, opening today.

Life in the Universe first explores our own solar system and discusses the possibility and likelihood of whether there could be simple life hidden somewhere beneath the surface of a planet or moon. Second, it delves into the galaxy and universe around us, discussing whether or not we might be alone in the universe, and why we haven’t been able to find anyone else so far.

For those of you who are interested in whether or not little green men might soon invade, or just want to learn more about the solar system, the galaxy and the universe that we live in, come on down to the Burke Baker Planetarium and check out Life in the Universe.

Happy Birthday George Observatory!

20 years ago, it was still the 80s. The Hubble Telescope had not been launched, nor returned the extraordinary images from the deepest regions of space that inspire such wonder today. Construction on the International Space Station hadn’t yet begun, and Pluto was still a planet.

Girl Scouts

And, 20 years ago today, the George Observatory was born. Since then, countless school children, aspiring astronomers, and people just interested in seeing the beauty of the stars and planets have visited the facility in Brazos Bend State Park.

For 20 years, kids have participated in simulated space missions by heading for outer space in our Challenger Learning Center. Visitors have gazed through our three telescopes, open to the public almost every Saturday night. Through our large 36′ Gueymard Research Telescope, visitors have been able to view the craters on the moon, all of the planets, comets, meteors, eclipses, and various stars and constellations. Using the telescope, a group from the Fort Bend Astronomy Club has discovered more than 400 asteroids – and named five of them. Come by on a Saturday night, and you’ll meet many of them – as they’re frequently on hand to share a look through their telescopes and a passion for observing.

Over the last 20 years, dozens of probes and satellites have been sent to scout nearby moons and planets. NASA has plans to study them in more detail, explore new masses, and is planning the completion of the International Space Station in 2011.

Who knows what the future of space holds for mankind? Supernovas exploding in the deep of space, space colonization, or even intelligent life on other planets. We fervently hope that the George will inspire kids to be a part of the future of science and space exploration, wherever that might lead them – and into an exploration of the unknown. We look forward to discovering the future of space and uncovering new mysteries along with you at the George Observatory.
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