Staff Picks: Best of the Cockrell Butterfly Center

The Cockrell Butterfly Center (CBC) is most well known for its free-flying butterflies inhabiting a three-story indoor rainforest. But there are many other cool things to see and experience at the CBC! We checked with staff members and asked them about their favorite sections of the center, and this is what they said:

Lauren – Lauren is the butterfly entomologist and she takes care of the 800 to 1,000 imported butterflies we receive every week. Her staff picks are the chrysalis emergence chambers. The emergence chambers showcase thousands of live chrysalids of every size, shape and color imaginable! Many have gold spots or flecks. The word “chrysalis” comes from the Greek word for gold, “chrysós.” If you watch carefully you can even observe butterflies emerging, leaving an empty chrysalis shell behind, which they cling to while their wings stretch and dry.

lauren with chrysalids

Lauren stands next to the chrysalis chambers where you can watch butterflies as they emerge.

Erin – Erin is a board certified entomologist and is the insect zoo manager. She cares for all the non-butterfly bugs in the CBC. Her staff pick is the eastern lubber grasshopper sculpture found at the entrance of the entomology hall. The larger-than-life sculpture shows the anatomical details of the grasshopper’s body parts on one side, like the head, thorax, abdomen, wings and antennae. On the other side it shows a cross-section, displaying the insect’s internal organ systems. It’s a great visual introduction of what makes an insect, an insect. 


Erin with the Eastern Lubber grasshopper sculpture you can enjoy in the CBC entomology hall.

Nancy – Nancy is the director of the CBC. Her staff-pick is spicebush caterpillar sculpture found in the entrance of the butterfly center. The giant caterpillar welcomes each visitor into the butterfly center and is a great opportunity for photos! It may seem cartoon-ish, but the sculpture is actually a very realistic representation of the caterpillar that can be found right here in Houston! The large eye-spots on the back of the caterpillar function to trick or scare away predators by making it appear like a bigger animal. 

nancy on caterpillar

Nancy with the spicebush swallowtail caterpillar that greets guests as they enter the CBC.

Soni – Soni is the horticulturist that grows and cares for all of the plants in the CBC rainforest. Her staff pick is the Pride of Trinidad tree in the rainforest. The Pride of Trinidad (Warszewiczia coccinea) is native to Central and South America and the West Indies and is the national tree of Trinidad. The best part of this tree are its showy, flowering branches. Each flower cluster is accented with a red bract and is loaded with nectar. Inside the CBC rainforest, the Pride of Trinidad is in bloom year round and is constantly feeding a variety of butterflies! 


Soni shows off a cluster of flowers on the Pride of Trinidad that feeds many of the butterflies in the CBC rainforest.

Ryan – Ryan is the CBC Bugs-On-Wheels outreach presenter. He travels to schools, day-cares, camps, and clubs to present a variety of bug-related topics (check them out here: Bugs-On-Wheels). His staff pick is the vinegaroon (Mastigoproctus giganteus). This scary looking arachnid is actually quite harmless and easy to handle. They get their name from their defense mechanism. If threatened, glands near the rear of the abdomen can spray acetic acid which has a vinegar-y smell and may dissuade predators from making the vinegaroon their lunch!

ryan with vinnie

Ryan holds a vinegaroon showing their relatively docile nature.

Farrar – Farrar is the curatorial entomologist. He identifies and documents the thousands of species in the CBC’s entomology collection. His staff-pick is the beetle specimen display in the entomology hall. Beetle species make up almost 25 percent of all known animal species. They are found in almost all major natural habitats and are adapted to practically every kind of diet. The British biologist and atheist J.B.S. Haldane once said, when asked whether studying biology had taught him anything about the Creator: “I’m really not sure, except that He must be inordinately fond of beetles.” This quote lines the top of the beetle display in the CBC. 


Farrar stands next to the beetle specimen display you can visit in the CBC entomology hall.

Celeste – Celeste is the butterfly rearing coordinator. She breeds and raises butterflies for the CBC. Her staff pick is Charro, the CBC’s resident iguana! Charro is a Green Iguana (Iguana iguana). Despite this name, he is actually bright orange! Green Iguanas can be a variety of colors depending on what region they come from. Charro can be found relaxing in his enclosure in the rainforest or sunning himself outside the butterfly center by the demo garden. After hours, Charro gets to wander the entire rainforest freely. Don’t worry about the butterflies; Charro is strictly vegetarian. 


Celeste sits with Charro the iguana who resides inside the CBC rainforest.

Next time you visit the CBC make sure to check out all these staff picks, and take time to pick YOUR favorite part of the CBC!

Iguana invasion: Ship stowaway leads to international plea deal for Colombian infiltrator

When most folks want to see the Museum for free, they come on our free day (Thursdays from 2 to 5 p.m)

But one of our latest visitors did it differently: He stowed away on a cargo vessel amongst a shipment of tools — all the way from Colombia!

Our new Cockrell Butterfly Center resident, Chico

Chico — the ingenious little iguana — was discovered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services and spared prosecution in favor of coming to live with us here at HMNS.

Our new Cockrell Butterfly Center resident, Chico
At just 20.5 inches and estimated to be a year old, Chico is the youngest little lizard we’ve adopted. Our other iguana, Charro (who you probably recognize from the Cockrell Butterfly Center and his many Instagram fans), came to live with us when he was around 7 years and old and just about as large as he is now.

Our new Cockrell Butterfly Center resident, Chico

Charro is 14 years old and has a broken tail, whereas Chico’s in-tact tail is so long that there is actually more tail than lizard!

Chico is too young to yet determine whether he is, in fact, a chico or a chica, so we hedged our bets and gave him (her?) some name flexibility. For now, Chico will be hanging out behind-the-scenes with Butterfly Center staff as he grows big and strong enough to go on display.  As we’ve learned from Iguanas for Dummies (for real), it’s important to give young iguanas lots of “hands-on” experience so they will be people-friendly when they are larger.

We’d love to see Chico become a reincarnation of Sidney, one of our former pet iguanas, who may well have been part-dog. He so loved to be petted that he would occasionally climb into people’s laps!

Our new Cockrell Butterfly Center resident, Chico, receives a pet from Director Nancy GreigIguana know more? Be sure to check back on the Beyond Bones blog periodically as we update you on Chico’s progress!

Meet Charro, our new resident iguana!

The Butterfly Center recently acquired a new iguana.  His name is Charro (which means “cowboy” – as in “charro beans”) and we believe he is between 5 and 10 years old.  For the time being, he is housed in a cage in the rainforest area.  We may eventually let him loose to wander freely in the Center, once he is thoroughly acclimated – but for now, he seems to be content (and is particularly visible to patrons) in his cage.  Keeping him confined does allow us to find him easily in order to take him outside for some exercise and sunshine on a daily basis. 

We’ve had several free-ranging iguanas in the Center over the years.  It is a perfect place for them – much better than the situations in which pet iguanas are typically found.  Indeed, all of our resident iguanas have been pets that outgrew the space and/or time their owners could provide them.  I think it is unfortunate that these creatures continue to be sold as pets:  what starts as a cute little green lizard ends up as a small dinosaur – and most people are not prepared to handle the latter.

But as a result of all the iguanas we’ve had, I’ve learned more about them than I ever expected to know.  They are actually very interesting and personable creatures!  If you’d like to learn more yourself, read on – or check out the excellent information at the website of the Green Iguana Society.

iguana of sea
Galapagos Island Iguana
Creative Commons License photo credit: Ansgar Berhorn

Iguanas are in the same family (Iguanidae) as the little green or brown anole lizards we see in our gardens here in the southern USA.  The most common species available through the pet trade is the common or green iguana.  Green iguanas (the scientific name is Iguana iguana) are common in tropical areas from Mexico to South America.  In their native habitat, they often sit sunning themselves high up in trees, especially along rivers.  If a hawk or eagle flies over (both are major predators of iguanas) they will fling themselves into the river below.  They are excellent swimmers!   There are several other species of iguana, including the spiny or black iguana (also common in Central America, especially near the coast), and of course the famous marine iguanas and land iguanas of the Galapagos Islands (both species believed to have evolved from green iguanas). 

summer-09-042Baby iguanas are about 8 inches or so long and bright green.  But they soon get much larger, some growing to over 6 feet long.  As they mature, they lose their bright green color, and males in particular gain “secondary sexual characteristics.”  People often ask about Charro’s large jowls (the big lumps on either side of his head).  We like to say that they are like biceps on men – enticing to females and intimidating to other males!  The jowls, large dewlap (flap of skin below the chin), and the orangish skin color are all characters seen in mature male iguanas.  Male iguanas also develop fatty deposits on top of their head.  Mature females are slimmer and duller colored, with smaller jowls and dewlap and no head lumps. 

Although much less colorful than the babies, adult iguanas can change color up to a point.  We’ve noticed that Charro gets darker when he is taken out into the sunshine, and lighter when he’s back in his cage.  Iguanas use their color to regulate their body temperature – they darken up to absorb more heat.  An iguana’s color can also indicate its mood or stress levels (sometimes their colors become more contrasting when threatened or frightened).  Male iguanas in particular become more colorful when they are in their breeding season.  The orange becomes brighter, and the black stripes on the tail, etc., more pronounced.

Iguanas apparently have excellent vision, and can see colors as well as we do.  They also have a “third eye” (called the parietal eye), a clear scale on the top of their head.  This organ senses light and dark, and alerts them to aerial predators.  

Male iguanas in particular develop pointed “tubercular scales” on the back of the neck, and have a ridge of flexible spines along the back.  I have not been able to find any known function for these, beyond ornament.  Quite a few of Charro’s ridge spines have been broken off, and we are not sure whether they will grow back.  Iguanas do molt their skin periodically – unlike snakes, which shed their entire skin at once, iguanas lose theirs in patches over several weeks. 

Iguanas can live for over 15 years, but usually don’t make it that long in the wild because other animals (including humans) love to eat them!  In fact, they are sometimes called “chicken of the trees” or “bamboo chicken.” Their eggs are also eaten, and their skin is sometimes used for belts or boots, etc.

summer-09-040Iguanas themselves are strict vegetarians, which is rather unusual among lizards (most eat insects or other small animals).  For us, of course, it is fortunate that iguanas have no interest in eating butterflies!  We feed Charro healthy salads of vegetables and fruits.  Greeny leafy vegetables such as collard greens are especially good for him.   According to the Green Iguana Society website, although iguanas will eat almost anything you offer them, they should not be given any animal protein!

Because iguanas, especially the males, are quite territorial, we have been advised (by none less than the director of the Houston Zoo) to keep only one iguana at a time.  Indeed, many years ago when we had a male and female, they had a tremendous battle and the male was badly injured.  Although in nature you may see several iguanas in close proximity, they are not social creatures and really only get together to mate. 

Long-time patrons of the Butterfly Center will remember some of our previous iguanas.  Sidney died in 2004 at the age of 14, after more than three years in the Center.  A large, stocky and colorful iguana, he acted more like a dog than a lizard; he was so friendly that he would crawl into people’s laps to be petted.  When Sidney died, we had an autopsy done; the vet told us he died of a heart attack (apparently a common cause of death in older, captive, male iguanas!) 

Gandalf was not quite as friendly as Sidney, but was a truly magnificent specimen.  Unlike Sidney and Charro, he had a complete, unbroken tail that was exceedingly long (Gandalf was about 6 feet long including the tail.)  Unfortunately, after several years of climbing all over the Center, he made an unfortunate misstep.  We believe he slipped off one of the planters on the second floor and crashed onto the cement floor around the cenote.   This undoubtedly happens in nature as well: during one field season in Costa Rica I used to admire a large iguana that sunned himself every day on a high and slender branch of a cecropia tree along the Puerto Viejo river.  One day I noticed that the branch had broken off…I never saw that particular iguana again. 

Stretch immediately preceded Charro.  He was never a happy or friendly iguana, and died of old age/ill health earlier this year (2009), less than two years after he came to us.   Charro was acquired for us earlier this summer by Olga, one of the visitor services staff who has a friend at the Brownsville Zoo, Charro’s previous home.
From our previous experiences we’ve learned that individual iguanas, once you get to know them, definitely have personalities!  So far Charro seems to be a very laid-back, tolerant, and well-behaved iguana.  However, we always impress upon visitors that iguanas can bite, although it is usually a last resort and they usually give plenty of warning.  However, when it happens, an iguana bite can be serious.  They have lots of very sharp little teeth – it’s like getting slashed with a hacksaw.

Fortunately, we have learned to read the signs:  iguanas typically give behavioral clues about their mood.  When an iguana is comfortable and happy (for example when we pour water over Charro’s head, something he seems to particularly enjoy) it will stand up on its front legs, raising its head in the air.  Most iguanas also enjoy being petted, particularly behind the head, or under the chin and jowls, or along the back.  Sometimes they close their eyes in pleasure, leaning into the caress just like a dog or cat, and even look as if they are smiling!

An angry iguana, however, is quite fearsome.  If frightened or seriously irritated, it will typically turn its side to whatever is bothering it and stand up on all four legs, apparently trying to maximize its size.  It may also walk forward in a stiff-legged manner, sometimes opening its mouth and wagging its tail.  This is not a friendly wag – it means the iguana may whip with its tail or even bite!  At this point it’s time to back off and give the iguana some space.

People sometimes voice concerns about iguanas and salmonella.  Yes, some iguanas can carry it.  So after handling Charro or any other reptile, for that matter, it is a good idea to wash one’s hands thoroughly, especially before eating.

summer-09-043If you don’t see Charro in the Butterfly Center when you visit, check outside by the Kugel Ball.  A number of docents have volunteered to take him out for a “sunbath” on sunny days.  Iguanas need the heat, as well as the UV A and B wavelengths provided by the sun’s rays (or the simulated sunshine provided by a UV lamp), to get warm enough to move and to eat/digest food, as well as to manufacture vitamin D (just like humans).  We try to get Charro outside for at least half an hour, several times a week.  It’s also a good way to let people see him up close!

Any of you iguana experts out there – I’d be happy to hear feedback about any aspect of iguanas and their care.  We’re always learning about them!

My Summer at the Cockrell Butterfly Center

Laura Adian, an intern in our Cockrell Butterfly Center, is a guest blogger for us today.  Join us as she writes about her summer internship and what tasks she does for the museum, maintaining the butterfly center and the greenhouses.

Howdy!  My name is Laura Adian and I am one of the horticultural summer interns at the Cockrell Butterfly Center.  I am a senior Horticulture major, minoring in Business, at Texas A&M University. Although I am interested in all areas of horticultute, my specialization is fruit and vegetable production.  I wanted to give you a quick insight into my daily job here, as well as the day to day happenings in our butterfly center, so here it goes.

On Mondays and Tuesdays, I work in the main conservatory.  One of the most important things I do on these days is what we call “open” the Butterfly Center.  This involves sweeping the leaf debris from all of the pathways and stairs, watering and raking the plant beds, putting out the amino solution and rotten fruit for the butterflies, feeding the iguana, and turning on the waterfall.  Basically we just want to make the place look great for the public. 

After opening, there is always deadheading (pulling the dying blossoms off of a flower) and pruning to be done.  This has to be done every week to encourage more flowering and to keep the plants looking their best.  Fertilizing some of the flowering plants and orchids is another task that must be done on a regular basis in order to ensure maximum healthy growth. 

Passion Flower
Creative Commons License photo credit: Just chaos

For the rest of the week, I work in the greenhouses and in the Demonstration garden.  Up in the greenhouses, we raise butterflies and plants. 

Greenhouse #1 is where we do most of the propagating and repotting of the plants.  Greenhouse #2 is filled with 800 plants, mostly Passiflora, that we use as host plants for the butterflies.  This is also where we do recovery of the plants, after the caterpillars munch all the leaves off them. 

Greenhouse #3 contains the insectaries and pupation cages full of butterflies and caterpillars.  Every week, the host plants in the insectaries that are full of eggs are transferred to the pupation area.  Then, we put fresh host plants and nectar sources (from Greenhouse #2) into the insectaries.  In the pupation area, the hungry caterpillars must always be fed, which means transferring them from the already eaten, leafless plants to fresh plants that we bring from Greenhouse #2.  Afterwards, we take the eaten plants to the recovery table in Greenhouse #2.  This is the never-ending cycle of raising all the beautiful butterflies. 

One of the bigger projects we had to do this summer was to re-tie and re-moss all of the orchids in the conservatory.  The orchids are scattered throughout the conservatory on trees and poles and they must be rewrapped every year in order to keep their roots from drying out and to keep them looking nice.  That was quite a task because there are dozens of orchids and every time you think you’re done, another one seems to pop up.

Tattered Butterfly
Creative Commons License photo credit: B~

In the next week or so, we will be putting half a semi-truck load of soil into all of the beds in the conservatory.  We will also be planting 100 red and pink Pentas to ensure fresh nectar sources for the butterflies.  This is obviously a big undertaking but it must be done every summer and I can’t wait to see how good the conservatory looks after we’re done.

We also have to water in the greenhouses every day and fertilize all the plants regularly.  Then, of course, there is the general maintenance of the greenhouses, which seems to be an ongoing project.

Me in the demonstration garden

In the Demonstration garden, we are planting many new nectar sources and host plants for the butterflies to come check out.  Since I’ve been here we’ve planted Pentas, Pink Turk’s Cap, Asters, Milkweed, Lantana, Celosia, Passion vines, Dutchmans’ Pipevine, and many more.  Right now, we are in the process of planting Dwarf Mondo grass in between the cracks of all the stones.  We have already planted 7 flats and will plant 10 more in the weeks to come.  In the next few weeks, we will also add a bench and some other focal areas.  Again, watering and fertilizing must be done on a regular basis.  The Demonstration garden is one of my favorite projects and it looks fantastic.

We also maintain the plant cart in the Grand Hall of the museum.  We price plants from the greenhouse and bring them down to the plant cart to sell.  We sell nectar sources and host plants such as Salvia, Pentas, Lantana, Passion vines, and Durantas.  We have to sweep the plant cart, water the plants, switch out plants, and fill the brochure holder on a daily basis.  For the Fourth of July weekend we even did a red, white, and blue theme.

I have even been fortunate enough to get to go on fieldtrips to some great nurseries this summer.  We have been to Treesearch Farms, Hines Nursery, Nelson Water Gardens, and Cornelius Nurseries.  We are also planning on going to Mercer Arboretum later this summer.  None of this would be possible if not for the great staff at the Butterfly Center and their desire for us to have an awesome experience this summer and to see all that we can in our 10 week stay.

That is basically my summer in a nutshell.  I really couldn’t have asked for a better internship or better people to work with this summer.  I have learned so much about butterfly rearing and all that it takes to run a huge operation like the Cockrell Butterfly Center.  More importantly, I have met some amazing people who are top in their fields, always willing to lend a hand, and really passionate about their work.  My experience this summer would not be nearly the same without them.