HMNS Weekly Happenings

 

Shell bottom-original

 

Check out our New Exhibit!
Gems of the Sea: The Guido T. Poppe Collection

World class. One of a kind. Never before seen. Made by mollusks.

The Philippines consists of over 7,500 islands in Southeast Asia, totaling a land area of approximately 116,000 square miles, and giving the Philippines the longest coastlines of any nation in the world. The Philippine archipelago is known to possess some of the richest marine biodiversity in the world. Along with their unparalleled diversity among the species, marine mollusks from this area are of great interest to science for their peculiar interactions and adaptations in their marine environment

 

Guests adoring the Virgen de Guadalupe shrine.

Guests adoring the Virgen de Guadalupe shrine.

 

Behind The Scenes Tour: La Virgen De Guadalupe
-August 31 at 6:00 PM
-Members Tickets $17, Public Adults tickets $27

The year 1531 fell within a tumultuous period of the history of the Americas. The Spanish Conquistador Hernan Cortes had successfully toppled the Aztec Empire, and after almost a decade of warfare, disease, and relocation the indigenous people of Mexico were looking for hope; for a more peaceful and enlightened future. Hope was brought to Juan Diego that year, on Tepeyacac hill, by the Virgin de Guadalupe. Your guide will trace the history of Christianity in Mexico from the 700 year reconquest of Spain, to the epic battle for the Aztec Capital, all the way to the miraculous image that gives hope to millions even today.

 

Karaja -- feather mosaic headdress

 

Behind the Scenes Tour of Amazon Life on the River

-August 31 at 6:30 PM
-Members $17, Public Adult Tickets $27

HMNS has an unparalleled Amazonia collection. Featured in our exhibit are objects ranging from ritual masks and headresses used to help commune, and sometimes ward off, spirits, to insterments designed to test young male initiates to their limits of their capacity to tolerate pain, to tools used in the elaborate processes one must go through simply to attain food in the harsh environment of the Amazon. Master Docents will lead guests on a journey into darkness and reveal, not just the exoticism, but the humanity of the amazing people who inhabit one of the most mysterious regions of the world. This a temporary exhibition, so see these wonders while you can.

 

Coming Soon!

Bill_of_Rights_web

 

Amending America: The Bill of Rights

 

Member Opening: Sept. 2, 2016 | Public Opening: Sept. 5, 2016

The Houston Museum of Natural Science will be the premier venue, opening Amending America: The Bill of Rights to the public September 2, 2016 through January 8, 2017. The exhibition will be on view during the 2016 Election period, and to celebrate the 225th anniversary of the Bill of Rights in December 2016.
 
 
 
owls

 

An Evening With Owls

 September 16 & 17 | 6:30 p.m.

Whoooo’s looking at you? It’s no owl. It’s an insect! With black spots rimmed by gold and white on their wings that resemble glowing eyes, owl butterflies’ unique camouflage deters potential predators. These big beauties are especially active at dusk. Spend An Evening with Owls at the Cockrell Butterfly Center and meet this fascinating species up close. Watch hundreds whirl and tumble at twilight, then grab a bite nearby and learn more about their behavior.

Food Trucks:
Pita Bites
HTownStEATs

Tickets will be on sale soon!

Mala-whaaa? Discover the incredible world of mollusks in the Strake Hall of Malacology

One of the most awesome parts of working for a Museum (especially one as large as ours) is how many people you get to meet and work with – all with something different that gets them excited about science! It’s easy to celebrate your inner geek when you can find fellow geeks who you can geek out with in a geeky fashion while geekily reveling in unique parts of the Museum.

You could ask anyone here and they’d be able to tell you which part of the Museum brings this out in me: the Strake Hall of Malacology.

“Mala-whaaaa?” you may ask.

Malacology is the study of mollusks, an incredible group of creatures that includes octopi, scallops, and my favorite, snails (but more on them later). They’re invertebrates belonging to the phylum Mollusca, and there are over 85,000 species of them in the world!

These invertebrates all have three features in common but are otherwise extremely diverse. They have a mantle containing a cavity used for breathing and excretion; a radula, which is used for feeding; and the same structure to their nervous systems, with two pairs of nerve chords: one serving the internal organs and another for locomotion.

Mollusks are also able to use their internal organs for multiple purposes. For example, their heart and kidneys are used in their reproductive, circulatory, and excretion systems.

Mollusks are more varied than any other phylum. Think about it: squids, octopi, cuttlefish, nautili, clams, mussels, oysters, conch, slugs, snails — they all have many diverse species and yet they’re all still mollusks! And this is due, in part at least, to how long they’ve been around. While there’s still significant scientific debate about their precise lineages, we know that they’ve been around since the Cambrian period (541 to 485 million years ago). This has allowed them to diversify to fit in many, many niches all around the world — from the depths of the ocean to mountain tops.

Now for my favorite: SNAILS! Perhaps it’s because of my name (Gary, like Spongebob’s pet snail) but I think snails are really cool. They account for 80% of mollusks, and are perhaps the most diverse of them all. They’re found everywhere, in part because some have evolved to have gills while others have lungs.

But that’s not all! Some species with gills can be found on land, others with lungs are found in freshwater — with a select few even found in marine environments! They’re in ditches, deserts, large bodies of water and everywhere in between. Most are herbivores, but there are also omnivores and predatory snails. They’re also found in many sizes, from giant African land snails 35 cm in length to some just 1.5 mm long.

So come to HMNS to the Strake Hall of Malacology to learn everything there is about these marvelous mollusks!

World-renowned malacologist Guido Poppe visits HMNS’ “magnificent” Hall of Malacology

HMNS’ Associate Curator of Malacology Tina Petway got a special treat last week in the form of one exceptionally dapper shell expert. World-renowned Belgian malacologist Guido Poppe traveled to Houston for the express purpose of visiting our museum and surveying our utterly impressive (and at times underappreciated) Hall of Malacology.

Renowned malacologist Guido Poppe visits the HMNS Hall of Malacology | June 27, 2012It was Poppe’s first visit to HMNS and was spurred on after he met Petway at a malacology conference in Philadelphia. “We’ve never had someone at this level come and visit,” Petway said of Poppe, who has authored numerous reference books on shells in the Phillipines — where he now lives — and has named nearly 200 new species.

Renowned malacologist Guido Poppe visits the HMNS Hall of Malacology | June 27, 2012Guido Poppe with HMNS Associate Curator of Malacology Tina Petway

Poppe was particularly impressed with a yellow Spondylus, or spiny oyster, on display.

“These are really rare; there are less than a dozen in the world,” Poppe said.

And even this world-traveling diver was impressed by the world’s largest sea shell, on display here at the HMNS Hall of Malacology. “I’ve never seen one this big!”

Renowned malacologist Guido Poppe visits the HMNS Hall of Malacology | June 27, 2012To schedule your next visit to our impressive Hall of Malacology, click here for tickets, and check out our Flickr photo set of the visit here.