Get Ready For Trains Over Texas!

All Aboard!

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“Trains Over Texas” being constructed at TW TrainWorx headquarters

 

Create holiday memories by travelling across Texas by model railroad in this scratch built  “O” scale model. The multiple trains crisscrossing the state will visit important and unique places in our state’s geology and physiography. Destinations include oil country salt domes, prairies and wetlands of the Texas coast and state and national monuments such as Enchanted Rock, Pedernales Falls, The Balcones Escarpment and Big Bend National Park.

Along the routes to these geologic wonders the trains will also pass through Galveston, Houston, Dallas, Fort Worth, Austin and San Antonio with other surprises along the route.

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Another train set built by TW TrainWorx, the builders of our set.

 

This exhibit (about the size of a tennis court) is the largest indoor “O” scale model railroad in Texas. Its been nine months in the making and it pulls into HMNS on November 18th.  Don’t miss what is sure to become a Houston holiday tradition! 

 

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Another train set built by TW TrainWorx.

 

Free with museum admission.

Geology Rocks! How I got involved with Occidental Petroleum

by Tania Campbell

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Here I am hiking the world famous Permian Reef Trail at the Guadalupe Mountains National Park to study carbonate rock outcrops.

I’ve worked as a production geologist for 11 years for Occidental Petroleum, and while that is a long run with one company in the energy industry, it has gone by fast. I remember being introduced to rocks in middle school, but by the time I was in high school, I was more interested in marine biology. I then went on to successfully complete a dual bachelor’s degree in marine science and geology, which laid the foundation for understanding carbonate rocks and basic geologic principles, starting me down my path as a production geologist.

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The Miami Circle, where American Indians carved a circular structural support out of bedrock limestone.

The first community project I got involved in that I attribute as a catalyst to my geology interest was working with an archaeological site called the Miami Circle. Approximately 2,000 years ago, American Indians used the bedrock limestone to carve out a perfect circle to support a structure. As a volunteer I only found a few animal artifacts, but I was most interested in the exposed limestone.

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A sample of core that has been cut and slabbed after it was taken from the subsurface in a well. A geologist will describe the rock types and features observed, and other interpretative data is combined to make geologic models and maps.

There are so many different kinds of specialties in geology that sometimes it can feel overwhelming trying to figure out what you want to do. I kept an open mind and set off to learn more with a master’s degree at a different school. It is highly recommended that geologists have their master’s if they want to work in the petroleum industry. I studied hydrogeology and petroleum geology for my master’s, which has helped me work better with team members from engineering backgrounds and develop further in my core profession of doing reservoir characterization. My role involves describing and modeling the layers of rock in the subsurface to predict the most favorable areas for continued secondary and tertiary hydrocarbon recovery.

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Hiking with other geologists through the canyon cuts to map the rock types and observe vertical stacking of the layers of carbonates and siliciclastics.

I am extremely thankful for my education and the career opportunities that have brought me to a place where I enjoy coming to work. Every day there is a different problem to tackle. Sometimes it requires communicating with engineers and understanding other types of non-geo data, or sometimes I need to go on a field trip to an outcrop or a core lab to visualize what the rocks could look like in the subsurface. Or Maybe that day I make maps of the reservoir. It is forever changing in the geology profession.

About the author: Tania Campbell is a production geologist with Oxy Permian Enhanced Oil Recovery, a global corporation partnered with the Houston Museum of Natural Science’s Girls Exploring Math and Science (GEMS) program to help educate girls through hands-on science activities and outreach.

HIPS HIPS HURRAY! [Dimetrodon Fossil Update]

Your HMNS field crew and lab staff score the missing pelvis!

Willie the Dimetrodon continues to command the attention of your Paleo Dept. personnel. In May through June, David Temple led an intrepid crew who gently lifted the plaster jacket containing Willie’s torso, shoulder and rump. Local ranchers Donny Gale and Gary Max Coltharp once again generously donated their time and machinery – especially useful was the Coltharp front-loader named “Lola.”

But still – though Willie is among the very finest D’dons anywhere, he had a pelvic deficit. Check out this hip diagram.

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Willie’s sacral ribs are there, the parts of the vertebral column that hold the hips. However, the hip bones themselves are still missing. Probably some hungry scavenger came by and bit these meaty bits off (one rib was twisted out of place too  and the lower left shoulder had some bite marks).

“Locality Edge” comes to the rescue. Discovered by a local science teacher four years ago, Locality Edge is an awesome outcrop of badlands, full of tortuous arroyos, box canyons and spires of red rock. The strata here are just a bit later than our Craddock Bone Bed and about a mile away. We removed a pelvis and set it in a drawer.

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We did note that this set of pelvic bones was unusual – the shape was not distorted by the tons of rock that had buried it. Most of the time the burial layers flatten out natural curves of the upper bone, the ilium, and the wide lower bones, pubis & ischium. The Edge pelvis miraculously survived 285 million years under the rock layers. The lower bones kept the strong inward curve that the living animal had.

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The thought erupted in our minds: Could the Edge pelvis fit our Willie? Was it big enough??

Was it the correct species? We took the pelvis out of its museum tray and I brought it to the small but excellent prep lab at the Morrison Museum in Colorado (located a short drive from the famous Coors Brewery). The Morrison Museum generously opens its facilities for special Houston projects. Thirty hours of work later, with the assistance of three delicate pneumatic chisels, the outer form was cleaned of the rock (note the specimen in the skilled hands of a Morrison volunteer at right).

Superb!  And  when the inner surface of the ilium was placed next to Willie’s sacral rib, they clicked together precisely.  The size was perfect. So was the shape – the Edge specimen clearly came from the same species and the same body size.

Now, the pelvis is getting its final beauty-treatment at the skilled hands of volunteers at the Houston Museum prep lab.

Thus the contributions of a dozen volunteers and staff, plus two labs, has taken us one step further in getting Willie up on his feet, to delight and instruct  HMNS visitors.

Examining the Aftermath of Hurricane Ike

Today’s guest blogger is Bryan Carlile, an environmental cartographer and photographer. Bryan will join a panel of experts at HMNS on Jan 21 at 6 p.m. to discuss the threats that affect our Texas Gulf Coast. In the article below, Bryan discusses his interest in geospatial technologies and how he was involved in the aftermath of Hurricane Ike.

Growing up, while kids around me pretended to be soldiers and football stars, I was recreating the great adventures of discovery in my backyard.  I imagined myself as a member of the Lewis & Clark expedition, discovering new worlds and mapping virgin territories.  Nothing has ever been as fascinating or exciting to me as the natural world.  I grew up with this obsessive passion for science, never knowing that it could become a profession.  I did not believe it was possible to make a career out of studying maps, weather patterns and taking pictures of the animals and landscapes that enthralled me.  After all, who gets to list ‘fun’ in their job description when they’re grown up?

As a geospatial technologies consultant my life is full of doing what I love.  I find myself at the center of modern technology, focused on both ancient and developing patterns of our incredible planet Earth.  Every day I combine geographic, temporal and spatial information to assist in the planning, decision-making and operational needs of many types of organizations.  I create everything from aerial maps of potential corporate sites to defined pollution boundaries for state and local agencies.  I am regularly involved in archeology, biology, cartography, ecology, forestry, geology, hydrology and real estate.

Working in Texas definitely keeps me busy.  Because it is such an enormous state, it encompasses many environments and endless potential.  Settled in Houston, I can study urban sprawl, the plains of the Hill Country and the fascinating Gulf Coast.  In 2008, when the coast was hit by the monumental hurricane named Ike, I was called upon as a first responder.  I boarded a helicopter and traveled to Galveston, prepared to assist when nature had dealt one of its worst blows.

As I hovered in the Galveston sky, searching for survivors and emergencies to report, I realized the gravity of what had occurred.  Nature left me awestruck.  I knew very few aircraft were allowed in this area, particularly not press helicopters, and because of this the average Texan would never know how hard their homeland was hit.  It felt important to me to capture this moment as a witness to the power of natural disasters and with the hope that maybe scientists could study these images to learn a little bit more about how the natural world works.  For the next several days my time on the helicopter was spent concentrating on obtaining the best aerial photographs I could.  Aerial photography has always been a hobby of mine and there was no better time to put my skills to good use.

Educating ourselves about nature and natural disasters is one of the most important things humans can do.  Our planet is a precious resource and the more we learn about the way it works the more we can do to keep it healthy and happy.  My next adventure suddenly seemed obvious: What better way to learn about these images than to present them to oceanographers, photographers and natural scientists?  Better yet, what if their findings could be discussed among not only each other, but residents of the area that was so affected?

Thursday, Jan. 21 at HMNS, an assembled team from across the country will join together to assess the impact of Hurricane Ike as well as the fragile state of our unique and wonderful ecosystem.  The panel is composed of experts that can educate all of us about the Texas Gulf Coast and the effect of such a historically strong storm.  Beside me will sit environmental lawyer Jim Blackburn, Oceanography professor John B. Anderson, former director of Texas Parks & Wildlife Andrew Sansom, and the former chief scientist of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Center for Coastal Geology Abby Sallenger.  I have no doubt that I will learn as much as I can teach at this symposium, and my hope is for interested and concerned Houstonians to join us.  Let’s educate ourselves about the Texas Gulf Coast.  I’d love to see you there.

Come check out our symposium on the Texas Coast at HMNS on Jan. 21 at 6 p.m. Make sure that while you are here on Jan 21. you sign up to win an aerial tour of Galveston by helicopter.