Science Doesn’t Sleep (9.8.08)

Bacteria loves milk.
Creative Commons License photo credit: IRRI Images

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

A NASA administrator insists he backs the upcoming retirement of the space shuttle (leaving the U.S. unable to send astronauts to the International Space Station)  – despite a leaked e-mail to the contrary. Oh – and, the BBC reports that Chinese astronauts (called yuhangyuan) will perform their first-ever spacewalk.

Got bacteria? New research indicates that you shouldn’t be washing your antibiotics down with milk.

Bad news for mathletes: using your brain might be making you fat.

NPR asks: Can physicists be funny? (The answer is YES.) Scientists at CERN are going through improv comedy training to help reassure the public that they’re not about to create a giant black hole that will swallow the Earth.

Arctic permafrost holds twice as much carbon as the atmosphere – making it a potential environmental threat. Good thing it’s not melting at a disturbingly fast pace.

Does the President need to be tech-savvy?

Science Doesn’t Sleep (9.4.08)

Released to Public: Astronaut Robert L. Curbeam, Jr., STS-116 Spacewalk (NASA)
“Houston…we’ve got a
SPAM problem.”
Creative Commons License photo credit:

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

There’s a new Manhattan floating around the Arctic – and it’s made of ice. Canada’s polar ice shelves are “crumbling at an alarming pace.” In other good news: sea levels will rise much faster than we thought.

It’s possibly the lamest thing ever done in space: yesterday, astronauts spent some time updating their antivirus software.

It was the fake mustaches that tipped them off. Up to 10 percent of Near Earth Objects are comets impersonating asteroids – and new research aims to unmask them.

It’s really, really big: a black hole as big as 50 billion suns.

The ocean has its own lakes – called meddies – and scientists are using oil industry tech to study them.

Science Doesn’t Sleep (8.21.08)

What does this sound like?
Creative Commons License photo credit: yuri_koval

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

A new population of a species of rare leopards has been discovered in the forest in Borneo – providing new hope for this endangered species.

By analyzing Oetzi the Iceman’s clothing, scientists have discovered that the famous Neolithic man favored fashions made from sheep and cattle – indicating he was a herdsman. Their technique could have an impact on today’s fashion industry.

Can you hear light? New research thinks you can do anything you put your mind to.

Couldn’t afford a satellite for Christmas last year? Not to worry – they’re getting smaller – and cheaper.

Proof that you never know what you’ll find on eBay: a scientists bought a fossilized bug online and it turned out to be a previously unknown species of aphid.

Science Doesn’t Sleep (8.20.08)

Highway One
Creative Commons License photo credit: billaday

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

With dead zones expanding and a growing continent of plastic – is it too late to save the ocean?

It’s coming! Here’s an update on CERN’s progress as we countdown to the big day (they throw the switch Sept. 10.)

Shipwrecks: not just bad for the boat. New evidence suggests that coral reefs are victims, too.

Shocker: the current mass extinction may not be the only one humans are responsible for.

Japan has mandated that products are printed with information about their carbon footprint. Will people pay attention?

A Chicago man recently passed a tapeworm. A tapeworm that’s taller than he is.

All hail the underdog: the Olympics are full of elite athletes who science says shouldn’t be the best.