Still yearning for Earth Day learning? Join us April 28 for HMNS’ museum-wide celebration!

Founded in 1970 to commemorate the birth of the modern environmental movement, Earth Day (April 22) aimed to capitalize on an emerging national consciousness about the natural world and channel the energies of anti-war protests in a new direction.

earth day

Gaylord Nelson, a Wisconsin Senator, conceived the idea of a national holiday devoted to environmentalism after a devastating 1969 oil spill in Santa Barbara, Calif. With bipartisan support, the first-ever earth day inspired 20 million Americans to hit the streets and pour into public parks to rally for sustainable living.

Earth Day eventually lead to the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency and the passage of the Clean Air, Clean Water and Endangered Species Acts — but the battle for our earth is far from over.

Keep the celebration going at HMNS this weekend with Mobilize the Earth, a museum-wide event that teaches participants how to make their lives more sustainable and do their part for the planet.

Register an act of environmental service and join with Keep Houston Beautiful and the Hermann Park Conservancy to clean up the green space just north of HMNS, play around in recycled art at the booths inside our Grand Hall and learn about recycling, energy and water conservation.

What: “Mobilize the Earth” Earth Day celebration
When: April 28, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Where: HMNS grounds at 5555 Hermann Park Drive.

To purchase tickets to Mobilize the Earth, click here.

To learn more about Billion Acts of Green, click here.

—————

HMNS thanks the Marathon Oil Corporation for their continued support of the HMNS Energy Conservation Club, which sponsors HMNS’ annual Earth Day celebration.

Science Doesn’t Sleep (9.9.08)

Released to Public: Sinai Penninsula and Dead Sea from Space Shuttle Columbia, March 2002 (NASA)
Coming soon: giant black hole?
Creative Commons License photo credit: pingnews.com

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

Worried that CERN is about to create a giant black hole? (As in, tomorrow?) Steven Hawking has bet $100 that the 14-year, $8 billion project won’t even find what it’s looking for.

NASA’s Mars Rover has been Twittering madly since it landed on the Red Planet last May – and almost 34,000 people are following every mission detail. But what happens when the little guy finally shuts down?

Can we bring extinct species back? Sometimes, they’re not even actually gone.

“Nano” doesn’t necessarily mean “tiny,” at least in terms of risk – nanosilver is fast becoming widespread in new products – despite its EPA classification as an environmental hazard.

Ten things you didn’t know about the Earth. Like – what would it take to wipe it out?

How did Neanderthals give birth? Turns out, a lot like we do.

Science Doesn’t Sleep (9.8.08)

145ps_01087.jpg
Bacteria loves milk.
Creative Commons License photo credit: IRRI Images

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

A NASA administrator insists he backs the upcoming retirement of the space shuttle (leaving the U.S. unable to send astronauts to the International Space Station)  – despite a leaked e-mail to the contrary. Oh – and, the BBC reports that Chinese astronauts (called yuhangyuan) will perform their first-ever spacewalk.

Got bacteria? New research indicates that you shouldn’t be washing your antibiotics down with milk.

Bad news for mathletes: using your brain might be making you fat.

NPR asks: Can physicists be funny? (The answer is YES.) Scientists at CERN are going through improv comedy training to help reassure the public that they’re not about to create a giant black hole that will swallow the Earth.

Arctic permafrost holds twice as much carbon as the atmosphere – making it a potential environmental threat. Good thing it’s not melting at a disturbingly fast pace.

Does the President need to be tech-savvy?

Science Doesn’t Sleep (9.4.08)

Released to Public: Astronaut Robert L. Curbeam, Jr., STS-116 Spacewalk (NASA)
“Houston…we’ve got a
SPAM problem.”
Creative Commons License photo credit:
pingnews.com

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

There’s a new Manhattan floating around the Arctic – and it’s made of ice. Canada’s polar ice shelves are “crumbling at an alarming pace.” In other good news: sea levels will rise much faster than we thought.

It’s possibly the lamest thing ever done in space: yesterday, astronauts spent some time updating their antivirus software.

It was the fake mustaches that tipped them off. Up to 10 percent of Near Earth Objects are comets impersonating asteroids – and new research aims to unmask them.

It’s really, really big: a black hole as big as 50 billion suns.

The ocean has its own lakes – called meddies – and scientists are using oil industry tech to study them.