Kids Explore STEAM Careers with HMNS Outreach

Inspiring a child takes effort, time, passion and heart. It’s why we do what we do.

At the Houston Museum of Natural Science, discoveries are made daily. The sounds of learning fill our hallways every day, from the gasp of wonder from a kid stepping onto the Morian Overlook for the first time or the squeal of delight as a butterfly in the Cockrell Butterfly Center rests on a child’s shoulder. Those sounds are all the evidence we need to know we are upholding HMNS’ mission, its commitment to education.

For the kids that may not be able to get to the museum, there is HMNS Outreach. Our variety of programs brings HMNS straight to the community, visiting hundreds of schools and organizations each year and reaching more than 100,000 children in 2015 alone. The ultimate goal is to instill in these kids a love of learning that will carry them to new heights in their careers and throughout their lives.

Here are some of the many STEAM careers that HMNS Outreach can inspire a child to reach for.

Veterinarian

The TOTAL Wildlife On Wheels offers an extraordinary look at animals of all kinds. Students get an up close and personal encounter with wildlife ranging from snakes and frogs to birds and mammals.

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Students in Turner High School’s Vet Tech program observe the wing of a Ringneck Dove, which travels as part of the TOTAL Wildlife On Wheels Vertebrates program.

Forensic Scientist

A presentation of Cleanup Crew from the Bugs On Wheels program will cover the process of decomposition and the return of vital elements to the Earth. These principles of decomposition are crucial to forensic scientists, who use arthropods and fungi to study crime scenes and gather more information.

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Entomologist Erin Mills shows off a Giant African Millipede during a presentation of the Bugs On Wheels program Cleanup Crew.

Physician

Body Works is our newest set of programs in the Science Start family, and these presentations focus on the anatomy and capabilities of the human body. From the brain to the heart to the skeleton, each of these presentations will provide students with a comprehensive overview of what we can do with what we’ve got.

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Geologist

A Chevron Earth Science On Wheels program like Know Your Rocks is immensely useful for future careers in Geology. A students’ knowledge of the rock cycle and the differences between different types of rocks and fuels can be vital in fields such as the energy industry.

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A student discusses the properties of two different specimens with his classmates during a presentation of Know Your Rocks.

Astronomer

A visit from the HMNS Discovery Dome includes more than 40 different shows about a range of topics, including a classic planetarium show, The Starry Night. One of today’s kids could discover a new planet, a galaxy, or even a black hole, and the Dome provides a great foundation for an interest in astronomy.

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Students at Reagan High School file into the Discovery Dome for a screening of Cosmic Collisions, a show narrated by Robert Redford about different outer space encounters between celestial objects.

Anthropologist

An interest in foreign cultures can take you all over the world or even back in time. Anthropologists study the history of humanity, and Docents To Go programs such as Native Americans or Ancient Egypt provide students with an introduction to different communities and societies.

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Volunteer Bob Joyce shows an arrowhead and arrow used for hunting by Native Americans.

Chemist

Try a ConocoPhillips Science On Stage program like Cool Chemistry, which discusses different chemical reactions as well as the properties of polymers and liquid nitrogen. It’s a great glimpse into what chemistry is all about!

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Educator Carolyn Leap discusses the properties of a polymer during a presentation of Cool Chemistry.

Artist

Students at Johnston Middle School have had the opportunity to sketch animals from the museum’s TOTAL Wildlife On Wheels and Bugs On Wheels programs over the years, and they’ve produced some spectacular pieces, like the crocodile skull below.

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These are just a few of the many STEAM careers that are natural extensions of the concepts discussed in HMNS Outreach. We are proud to play an important role in the lives of students all over the Houston area and beyond, and we are honored to have the opportunity to inspire the next generation.

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A student draws Peanut, a Costa Rican Curly Hair Tarantula, as Peanut cooperatively sits still.

To book HMNS Outreach, email outreach@hmns.org, call us at the number listed on our site, or fill out this form online. We look forward to working with you!

Use Science to “Hack” Your Big Idea this Weekend at HMNS!

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Calling all particle physicists, designers, open source ninjas, molecular biologists, students, programmers, and rocket scientists to join forces at Science Hack Day Houston 2016, hosted by the Houston Museum of Natural Science!

Science Hack Day Houston is an overnight marathon event from April 2 to 3, open to anyone excited about making things through science. Join us to make, “hack” or invent cool things in an inspiring environment. All it takes is dedication and an insatiable curiosity. No experience necessary, but there is a catch — you and your team must race the clock to complete an experimental prototype within 30 consecutive hours.

Check out the full event schedule for more details, then use the map on the HMNS web site to find us. We suggest the HMNS Garage for all-weekend, overnight parking. We will give participants a coupon with a discount for this garage. For free three-hour parking, you can park at the Garden Center Lot or the Houston Zoo lots. Don’t forget public transit! A ticket on the MetroRail costs $1.25, and the museum is an eight-minute walk from the Hermann Park/Rice University station.

Science Hack Day is a hack-a-thon with a twist — anyone interested in science can share their thoughts, find a team, and form multidisciplinary teams of between two and five individuals to learn something new, have fun, and create a mind-blowing prototype within 30 hours. The idea is to mash up ideas, mediums, industries and people to spark inspiration for future collaborations. When participants arrive, there will be a few speakers and an hour of brainstorming and proposing hack ideas. You can pitch ideas, or join up with projects you’re interested in. After that, teams are free to get to work on their hacks. On Sunday afternoon, everyone will reconvene to check out the hacks and award prizes to the favorites. Registration is free for individuals and teams.

The Hacks: Have a great project in mind? Science Hack Day is a great place to work with eager Houstonians with all sorts of skills and hobbies to bring your ideas to life. It’s okay if you don’t arrive with hack ideas; we need all the creative minds we can find to help contribute in whatever way they can.

What to Bring: 

  1. Bring your laptop and charger and/or anything you would like to hack. We will have some gadgets you can borrow to hack.
  2. Do not bring food or beverages. We will provide all meals. Please take a look at the schedule. If you have dietary restrictions, please contact the SHDH committee.
  3. Bring a sweater – the museum can get very cold.
  4. You must bring a guardian if you are underage.

For the (Optional) Sleepover:

  1. Bring a sleeping bag, a cover and a sleeping pad. The floor at the museum is hard and cold, so prepare for those conditions.
  2. Bring a sleeping mask. Most lights will be on through the night.
  3. Bring some toiletries. It feels nice to change out your contacts and brush your teeth.
  4. Bring a change of clothes to feel fresh for the next day. You’ll feel better.

For more information please go to ScienceHackDayHouston.com.

Strong STEM Branches from GEMS: Girls Exploring Math and Science

The Houston Museum of Natural Science, along with the Girls Scouts of San Jacinto Council, cordially invite you to attend the Girls Exploring Math and Science event, Feb. 20 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. GEMS is a free event for members and is included with the purchase of a ticket to the museum’s permanent exhibit halls for non-members. It is open to girls and boys of all ages.GEMS4

Currently, women earn more college and graduate degrees than men, but a gender gap still persists in the fields of science and in higher-level math intensive fields such as engineering. The U.S. Census Bureau statistics place the percentage of women working in fields related to STEM at 7 percent in 1970 and at 23 percent in 1990. There has been little growth since, with an estimate of 26 percent, according to 2011 statistics.

There is plenty of evidence that demonstrates that many girls in elementary school show interest in STEM subjects and may even hold desires for future STEM-related careers. However, there is equal evidence that by fifth grade, interest appears to wane and continues to do so through high school in the general female population. While girls are not alone in this trend as it can be seen in other student demographics, it is troubling.

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Keeping girls interested in science and math long-term is a broad-spectrum problem with no easy solution. However, there are a number of curative steps that can be implemented to recoup interest in STEM subjects. Increasing the visibility of female role models in math and science is one important step. This helps girls envision themselves in such fields. HMNS and the GEMS program capitalizes on this idea by incorporating young and enthusiastic female role models with whom girls can interact.

In addition, during GEMS, the museum is packed with hands-on science and math opportunities, community booths, and other science professionals. Children and adults can take their time to fully explore the opportunities and careers available in the fields of science and math.

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Girls need opportunities and encouragement in a wide range of STEM-related activities not only at school, but also through extracurricular activities such as GEMS. Helping girls to see these fields as exciting, relevant, and viable will take hard work on the part of teachers, parents, community members, and volunteers. I encourage you to take a small step in providing this encouragement to a girl in your life by bringing her to experience GEMS.

Come to Energy Day for a fun look into the future (and for funnel cake)!

What do funnel cakes and energy have in common?

That’s not a question most people ask. Thankfully there’s an easy answer and that’s Houston’s Energy Day this Saturday, Oct. 17 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.! Houston’s Energy Day is the largest free family festival focused on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math), and they also have funnel cakes for sale! It’s a huge festival down in Sam Houston Park near the Heritage Society Museum.

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You can expect lots of awesome booths with fun activates and giveaways, and something fun for everybody. At the Navy booth, you can drive an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV) around a swimming pool. You can explore the interior of a NISSAN Leaf electric car. NASA will be on-site for cool giveaways, and both the Houston Rockets and the Houston Astros will have booths, so you can shoot some hoops and play a game of catch (though probably not at the same time).

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In addition to all the fun activities, there will be an award ceremony for the winners of several contests that have been going on during the year, such as The Houston Geological Society/Houston Museum of Natural Science/Consumer Energy Alliance Art, Essay & Media Contests. Winning students and teachers will receive scholarship money and a photo holding the big check.

Art Essay and and Media Contest

Live music will play between the award ceremonies. Alongside all the festivities and funnel cakes, our museum will be there, of course! I’ll be playing with a Van de Graaf generator (shocking I know), we’ll have a cast of some dinosaur bones for you to touch, and much, much more.

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So sleep in that Saturday and in the late morning, head down to Sam Houston Park for a free, fun-filled festival! See you there!

In the meantime, take a look at the rest of these other images from Energy Day in previous years.

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