On the Sixth Day of HMNS…hunt dinosaurs with Dr. Bob Bakker

There’s always a lot happening at the Houston Museum of Natural Science – especially during the holiday season. Today’s post is just one of the 12 ideas for fabulous family fun we’ve put together for you (it’s a take-off of everyone’s favorite holiday classic, The 12 Days of Christmas) We’ll be sharing the possibilities here every day until Christmas Eve. Best of all, most are activities that last past the holiday season – some, year round. You can also check them all out now at the spiffy new 12 Days of HMNS web site.

Today, hunt dinosaurs with famed paleontologist and HMNS curator of paleontology Dr. Robert Bakker. The video was shot in May 2008 on the ranch in Montana where Leonardo, the mummified dinosaur on display in Dinosaur Mummy CSI: Cretaceous Science Investigation, was found. Dr. Bakker tells us how a fossil like Leonardo was made, then takes us through the process of fossil hunting – from how to train your eye to find the smallest fragments to what to do once you’ve got a good layer of fossils going.

And – don’t miss Leonardo’s world premiere at HMNS! This spectacular mummified fossil – covered 90% with skin and including mummified internal organs – is going back to his permanent home in Malta after the exhibit closes on Jan. 11. Leonardo is truly a wonder – it evokes, more than any fossil I’ve ever seen, a real sense of what dinosaurs must have been like in life. You won’t want to miss seeing this in person.

Check out the first five days of HMNS:
On the first day of HMNS, explore The Birth of Christianity.
On the second day of HMNS, shop for Sci-tastic gifts.
On the third day of HMNS, meet Prancer the reindeer.
On the fourth day of HMNS, discover the making of The Star of Bethlehem.
On the fifth day, move it, move it with Madagascar 2in the Wortham IMAX Theatre.

VIDEO: The mummified dinosaur Leonardo – too good to be true?

“Unbelieveable!”

“Too good to be true…”

“A dinosaur with its last meal meal still preserved inside its stomach…..no one could hope for that….”
Those were some of the skeptical comments heard by Dr. Robert Bakker, Curator at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, from distinguished colleagues in the dino-science word.

“I was unconvinced too….until I came up to Malta, Montana myself,” says Bakker.

“One glance showed that all us PhD’s were wrong. Leonardo the Dinosaur MummyDOES have his gut contents superbly – beautifully – fossilized. At last, we know what the single most important family of dino-species ate.”

Over the past four years, a talented crew of hi-tech, x-ray specialists have scanned and probed and computer-manipulated Leonardo, inventing new techniques. “Northing’s the same anymore…” Bakker mused, “from now on…all us dino-hunters will search for bones on the outside AND the secrets on the inside.”

Now, Leonardo has made his way down to Houston, for a very special exhibit, Dinosaur Mummy CSI: Cretaceous Science Investigation. In this second video in our ongoing series (check out the first video in the series here), Dr. Bakker explains the inner workings of Leonardo’s species from The Great Plains Dinosaur Museum in Malta, Montana.

VIDEO: Mapping a dinosaur with Dr. Bob Bakker

As you can see from our newly-installed widget (see: right), we’re already excitedly counting down to the opening of Dinosaur Mummy CSI: Cretaceous Science Investigation, a world premiere exhibition HMNS is developing to showcase Leonardo, one of the most spectacular dinosaur mummies ever found – and the only herbivore discovered with preserved stomach contents.

Oh, yeah – it’s also covered over 90 percent of its body with skin impressions. Until someone develops a time machine, looking at Leonardo is the closest you can get to seeing a living dinosaur.

Until it opens Sept. 19, we’ll be bringing you a series of behind-the-scenes videos of our paleontology department preparing for the exhibit – traveling to Montana, where Leonardo was discovered, working to prepare the fossils of another hadrosaur named Peanut for display and much more. What do you want to see? Let us know and we’ll do our best to get it on film.

In our first video, Dr. Bakker, David Temple and several of our paleontology volunteers create a map of Peanut that will help them study the specimen as it was discovered – even after the fossils have all been removed and mounted.


You can also download the audio-only version to listen on your mP3 player by right-clicking here. UPDATE: If you can’t see the video above, you can now check it out on YouTube.
UPDATE: Check out the second video in the series – Dr. Bakker explains why Leonardo is such an extraordinary find.