What in the World is THAT!!??

We often receive pictures that look completely and totally alien and WEIRD to most people, but like good little Entomologists, we know exactly what they are! The picture sent in to us most recently from a gentleman in Deer Park is a two-for-one special!

Have you ever seen a very large green caterpillar with strange-looking white ovals protruding from it? Well, it’s not just one insect, it’s two.

The picture clearly shows a large green caterpillar with a horn on it’s rear. It’s a little blurry, but it’s clearly a type of hornworm. Hornworms are the larvae of sphinx moths. Sphinx moth caterpillars are characterized by a horn-like appendage on their last segment, giving rise to the common name. This is more than likely a tomato or tobacco hornworm. These caterpillars can devastate plants in the solanaceae family (tomatoes, tobacco, potatoes, peppers, etc.), so they are considered a major agricultural pest.  Fortunately for farmers these two species are often attacked by a little monster which lies inside those weird white protrusions.


Braconid wasps are tiny parasitic wasps of which there are over 50,000 species. These wasps are our friends. They do not sting, but they parasitize some of our most damaging pests like caterpillars, aphids, and  beetle larvae.  They are mostly internal parasites and they can parasitize most any developmental stage of insects. There are even ones minute enough to lay eggs inside itty bitty eggs of insects, like aphids. Braconid wasps are very species-specific. The species of wasp that commonly attacks tomato and tobacco hornworms is called Cotesia congregatus.

The female lays her eggs just under the skin of  the caterpillar and within days the larvae hatch and start to eat the caterpillar from the inside. After about a week the larvae of the wasp drill a hole in the host’s skin and form a silken white cocoon to pupate in. The cocoons are what you see protruding from the skin. If the caterpillar is still alive at this point, they don’t have much longer. The adult wasps later emerge and fly off to mate and parasitize another caterpillar.

As gruesome as this sounds, it’s all part of the delicate balance of nature. For every organism that exists, many others exist to keep their populations in check. This is the foundation of biological control. Biological control is a method that uses an insect’s natural predators and parasites against them. Way better than chemicals!

So there you have it, another mystery solved! If you have a tricky bug you’d like identified, or even just a question that’s been bugging you, send an e-mail to blogadmin@hmns.org. We’ll take our best crack at it and feature your question or picture in our blog. Until next time, happy bug watching!

Giant Atlas Moths fluttering into the Butterfly Center soon

atlas moth secret cloaking device revealed
Creative Commons License photo credit: woodleywonderworks

Well, it’s that time of year again… we have started to get Attacus atlas, aka Atlas moths, YEAH!!!!  This is always an exciting time for me because I get to tell everyone who keeps asking me that they are finally here!  Last week, I received 60 atlas moth cocoons from Malaysia and the Philippines.  Unlike the butterflies we receive on a regular basis that all emerge within a few weeks, the atlas moths should be emerging over a few months, so we should have them for a while. 

The Atlas moth belongs to the family of giant silk moths, Saturniidae. They are considered to be the largest moths in the world in terms of wing surface area.  These impressive moths can only be found naturally in Southeast Asia, where they are very common. Their name comes from either the Titan of Greek mythology or from the striking pattern on their wings, which resembles a map.  If you look at the tips of the forewings they resemble a snakes head, which makes for great predator protection.

The females are significantly larger than the males, especially their abdomen because she has to lay a bunch of eggs, which are already developed and ready to be fertilized.  The males have larger, bushier antennae, in order to detect female pheromones. 

 The females
are larger and have bigger abdomens

 The males are smaller and have longer antennae

 

Each moth starts it’s life as a beautiful, emerald-colored caterpillar. The larvae feed on a wide variety of food plants, and may even wander from one to another.  As it gets bigger it developes a more waxy, light-white-ish green coloration.  It then spins a silken cocoon to protect itself and pupates inside (This is different from butterflies who develop inside a chrysalis, not a cocoon).  The adults, as in other Saturniids, have no mouth parts whatsoever, so they cannot feed. They survive off of fat reserves they build up as caterpillars.

Moth
Polyphemus Moth
Creative Commons License photo credit: Andreanna

Moths fly at night, so you may see these large moths resting on trees in the Butterfly Center during the day, paying no attention to the butterflies fluttering all around them.  I try really hard each time a moth emerges to place it in a very obvious place so people can see them.  Many people think they are fake because they sit so still, but now you know they are not!

Some other moths that belong in the Saturniidae family that you can find around here include the cecropia moth (Hyalophora cecropia), polyphemus moth (Antheraea polyphemus), and the luna moth (Actias luna).  These moths aren’t as big as the atlas moth, but they are big when compared to other moths and butterflies in Texas. 

luna
Luna Moth
Creative Commons License photo credit: Aunt Owwee


I hope you get a chance to stop off and see our wonderful giants and keep a look out for the native moths, they are a wonder to see too!

Adopt A Butterfly – this Saturday

Perched
Creative Commons License photo credit: bensonkua

It’s easy to love the feeling of walking into the Cockrell Butterfly Center. As you take your first step inside, you’re ensconsed in the warmth of the air and the comforting blanket of humidity…well, as a native Houstonian, perhaps I find that feeling more comforting than most.  

As you skim over your surroundings, you’ll see flowers the size of your monitor, vines as thick as your keyboard, and the most inviting non-yellow brick road you’ve ever seen. Butterflies from all over the world aimlessly fly around you and it hits you like a ton of bricks that now is the time to relax and take life at a slower pace. After 10 minutes of pure relaxation, you finally start poking around the place and finding the most curious things: butterfly host plants holding cocoons and caterpillars, creeping vines crawling up two floors of glass walls to soak up the light, and the splash of the waterfall which causes tiny droplets of water to spray upwards while the butterflies dance on them. All of these things make up the rhythm of life within the Cockrell Butterfly Center.

Now, it’s your chance to participate in that rhythm. For a contribution of $15, you can release a butterfly into the Center and become a butterfly parent. Your contribution helps to pay for butterfly and insect food, for weeds to be cut back, for new plants and insect species to be introduced, and for the upkeep of our greenhouse – a safe haven for butterflies and plants until they are mature enough to reach the Center. You are also contributing to HMNS’ ability to provide you and all of our visitors with the latest information and research about these incredible creatures.

Frittilary
Creative Commons License photo credit: Lida Rose

Adopt A Butterfly

Join us this Saturday (October 11, 2008) from 9 am until 2 pm in the Cockrell Butterfly Center for your chance to release a young butterfly into its new home. Adopt A Butterfly tickets can be purchased online or at the door for $15. Receive your butterfly to be released in the Center, your adoption certificate, your name on our web site as a Butterfly Parent, and a small commemorative gift for your donation.

While you’re here, participate in our crafts and activities! Houston Holocaust Museum is spreading awareness of The Butterfly Project here at HMNS. Find out more at their web site and learn how you can help.