Tree frogs! Serpents! Monkey-eating birds! Peel back the layers of the rainforest with our new Wildlife on Wheels

Our latest wild and wonderful Wildlife on Wheels (WOW) program focuses on the animals of the rainforest — from tree frogs and slithering snakes to millipedes and rainbow boas.

photo 5WOW presenters break down the layers of the rainforest — the forest floor, understorey, canopy and emergent layers — and impart the important role rainforests play in contributing to our natural resources.

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For example: Did you know that more than half of the world’s plants, animals and insects reside in the rainforest? Its vitality is crucial to the world’s oxygen supply, and its rich plant life is the source of lots of modern medicines.

photo 6Using live animals and specimens, HMNS educators also teach students about the rainforest’s unique quirks. For example: Did you know that 50 percent of rainforest rainfall never even hits the ground?

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HMNS Wildlife on Wheels programs can be booked as supplements to a field trip or delivered straight to your school for an in-class presentation.

For more information on the Rainforest Wildlife on Wheels or other Outreach programs, click here!

 

Insect Insight: Grecian Shoemaker

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The Grecian Shoemaker
Catonephele Numilia

Each month, Erin and I are going to give you an upclose look at one of the bugs we have on display – an Insect Insight.

For the first, I thought I would share one of my absolute favorite butterflies with you.  I chose this one because it coincides with the recent blog “Buggin’ around in Costa Rica.”  The butterfly farm that we visited, El Bosque Nuevo, raises these butterflies.   

Catonephele numilia is native to Central and South America.  The common name is the Grecian Shoemaker or Blue-frosted Catone.  Adult males and females of this species exhibit sexual dimorphism by looking totally different.  Males are black with six orange dots on the dorsal surface of the wings whereas females are black with a light yellow band across the center of the fore wings

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The Grecian Shoemaker exhibits
sexual dimorphism

Creative Commons License photo credit: emills1
Feisty caterpillar

When the wings are closed, both male and females look alike (as you can see in the first photo) and can often be seen feeding on rotten fruit.  In their natural habitat of wet lowland forests, the males tend to stay higher in the canopy while the female searches for host plants and nectar sources closer to the ground. 

The caterpillars of this species are rather aggressive when encounters occur with others of their kind.  A disturbed caterpillar will violently swing its spiky head back and forth to try to keep its enemies at bay. 

I had read about this crazy behavior and was so excited to actually see it at the butterfly farm.  Next time you are visiting the Cockrell Butterfly Center, keep an eye out for this butterfly taking in rays on a plant or sipping juice from fruit! And be sure to check back next month for more info about one of our six-legged friends!